This career rocks man, seriously.

c172captain

Well-Known Member
I know that right now is one of severe lows when it comes to the airline industry but there is definitely still some jobs out there that make this career worth going for. I spoke with my uncle today, a B767/B757 FO for CAL, and he seems to have the rest of the year off until December 24th. He's a highly senior first officer and no he did not get furloughed, he is just hanging out at home for a month and a half doing nothing but making the monthly guarantee of 72 hours (I think that's what it is, I'm not looking it up). I don't know what you guys think, but I truly think that scenarios like this make this career all the more worth it. Even with it's up's and down's, I think that this line of work has extremely high pros when compared to other jobs of equal status/education requirement/annual pay.

I know what some of the more pessimistic people might say on here, but Sean! He's going to be in Rio de Janeiro on Christmas and then in Amsterdam for New Years'! How can anyone bare to be away from their families on such important holidays?! I asked him this... his response was that it actually was a nice break after being home for a month and a half. I feel, me, not him or anyone else, that being home for that long with your family for so long everyday like that, more than makes up for the two-three "important" days that you miss in the entire year.

I thought I'd just put this recently attained information into the pool of general knowledge. Take it for what you think it's worth. I'm sure there are hundreds of ways to skew this into something so negative that people will hate this job. Me, personally, think that it's the coolest thing in the world.
 

JulietBravo

On Call, On Demand
That's awesome. It's good to here some positive attitude again! Makes me feel like I am doing this for a good reason...
 

splash

your social justice comic center
Got anything to say to the pilots that have been trying to get their foot in the door for over ten years eating crackers? I'm sure they are all ears open! I can put my two cents in for the rookies... Plan on CFIing and teaching English as a second language at the flight controls until you make the right connections (how ever long that may take).

This career rocks man, but seriously man... getting your foot in the door is the hardest part.
 

c172captain

Well-Known Member
I'm not saying it's easy. I'm saying that once you're there, it's the life ;)
This is the kind of stuff that keeps me going, trying to get my foot in the door.
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
Got anything to say to the pilots that have been trying to get their foot in the door for over ten years eating crackers? I'm sure they are all ears open! I can put my two cents in for the rookies... Plan on CFIing and teaching English as a second language at the flight controls until you make the right connections (how ever long that may take).

This career rocks man, but seriously man... getting your foot in the door is the hardest part.
Be willing to move, shave, sacrifice, ect.
 

flyinguitar

Well-Known Member
I can't argue, that sure sounds great.

I will finish the year having made about $16,000 as a full-time CFI. I live with my parents in a town that I love, so I'm doing fine and saving plenty. The more I see of this career, the more it seems like a big endurance race.
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
This career sucks. This career sucks because I can't pay my bills. Any career that does not allow you to pay your bills sucks big fat sweaty balls.
 

flyinguitar

Well-Known Member
This career sucks. This career sucks because I can't pay my bills. Any career that does not allow you to pay your bills sucks big fat sweaty balls.
Yeah. To everyone considering being a pilot: PLAN AHEAD for your entry-level years (and beyond) and be sure to get a REALISTIC picture of how much you'll be making. If I had any more bills than my $420 monthly student loan payment, I'd be screwed.

But C172 captain, kudos to you for posting some positive thoughts at a time when all we seem to be able to do is mope and despair. You're right - it can be a great career, and there's a lot to look forward to if we keep on truckin'. :)
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
It's not all roses.

0430 Van rides.
Not seeing your kids recitals
No stability.
Job losses
Whipsawing regionals all clambering for a piece of the pie.
Medicals.
Bad day checkrides.
15 seconds of oops kills YEARS of attaboys.
Lots more.

Just keeping it real.
 

CaptBill

Well-Known Member
I don't know what you guys think, but I truly think that scenarios like this make this career all the more worth it. Even with it's up's and down's, I think that this line of work has extremely high pros when compared to other jobs of equal status/education requirement/annual pay........

Me, personally, think that it's the coolest thing in the world.

Your optimistic view will help you navigate a tough road ahead. Opinions will vary, but I happen to agree with you that it's one of the coolest things in the world. :)
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
This career sucks. This career sucks because I can't pay my bills. Any career that does not allow you to pay your bills sucks big fat sweaty balls.
You're a first year FO living in San Diego...

There's your problem right there :)
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
It's not all roses.

0430 Van rides.
Not seeing your kids recitals
No stability.
Job losses
Whipsawing regionals all clambering for a piece of the pie.
Medicals.
Bad day checkrides.
15 seconds of oops kills YEARS of attaboys.
Lots more.

Just keeping it real.
Not to mention - COMMUTING!!! :banghead:
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
Rio de Janeiro on Christmas and then in Amsterdam for New Years'! How can anyone bare to be away from their families on such important holidays?! I asked him this... his response was that it actually was a nice break after being home for a month and a half. .
Yeah thats all good when your single.

When your significant other(s) are not with you at these cool places, it just another place after a while.
 

fly8slep

New Member
Dude, I hope you realize when someone says they timed out, it basically means they had no life for the last 11 months because they were up in the sky/on duty most of the months. That's not exactly a career rocking scenario. By the way the dirg bag operations make you fly pt91 mainteance flights while you've timed out, YES you have to do them since they don't count for your 121 total year time. Sounds like your uncle had the seniority to pull a reserve month but as you said, that's not worth much at all. We should all strive for 30 hours per month, 12 months a year, not timing out... Kind of like my good friend flying for a fractional. He makes 6 figures and a busy month for him is 50 hours.
 

jrh

Well-Known Member
I've never understood how some people can have nothing good to say about their work, yet won't quit and do something different. To me it seems pretty simple. The day I see opportunities that, all things considered, are obviously better than flying, is the day I'll quit flying. And since I haven't seen anything better than flying yet, it makes no sense to complain about being in the best spot possible, right?

That's not to say everything is perfect. It isn't. But I can still be satisfied where I'm at while looking for ways to improve my situation.

I've also never understood what's so amazing about airline flying. There's a big world out there, away from the airlines. With my work, I'm home almost every night, get most weekends and every holiday off, fly a wide variety of aircraft, and make about as much as a second year regional FO. Honestly, I never set out to do the work I'm doing, but I'm happy with it now that I'm here. And it doesn't take a tremendous amount of experience to do what I'm doing, it's not like I have the resume of an astronaut...I've just kept an open mind and worked hard. It seems like a lot of people "settle" for airline flying because they don't make opportunities for themselves elsewhere. Just my observations.
 
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