Odd Bylaw.....

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
Well,
The club I belong to has two aircraft. A warrior and 182 Skylane. There has been a bylaw that states that only a private pilot is able to fly the 182. I asked the club president if I could fly the 182 if I had my instructor in it with me because I wanted to start my instrument training before my 17th birthday and he said no.
I asked him for the reasoning behind this bylaw and asked if there could possibly be an exception for the growing number of under 17 student pilots in the club. I wanted the bylaw to be based on hours. He has not responded for about a week so I guess that is that.
Do any of you have odd bylaws that just do not make much sense?
 

TGatch

Well-Known Member
You'd think that the warrior would be for the private pilots only. Less power. I agree though even with a cfi, that's kind of dumb.
 

USMC-SSGT

Well-Known Member
The reason is typically owner set and here is why based on my club experiences:

If a non private pilot is flying their plane they are assuming someone with less experience at the controls and are also expecting many touch and go landings and rough landings. Since most accidents happen in the landing phase they just do not want to deal with it and can probably afford to take the hit on not letting non rated pilots fly in their plane. It is not a personal judgment on your actual skills as a pilot they just dont want to deal with the hassle. Even my flight school had a few leasebacks and some specified "no primary training" and others specified "no touch and gos."
 

jhugz

#lighttwin Mafia
Solo I can see his point...but I don't understand his logic if there would be a CFI in the plane.
 

Vyse

BirchJet CA
All clubs have their unique quirky rules.

If you want to fly, just get the PPL.

If you want to change the rule(s), get the other under 17 year olds together and elect a slate of officers/Board members that will change the rule.

Unless it's an owner-imposed rule, then you have to convince the owner.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
If you want to fly, just get the PPL.

If you want to change the rule(s), get the other under 17 year olds together and elect a slate of officers/Board members that will change the rule.

Unless it's an owner-imposed rule, then you have to convince the owner.
But I cant for another 5 months! That is the problem. The flying club owns the airplane so there is not owner. I really like the people in the club, and the costs, but these odd rules are starting to get to me.......
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
But I cant for another 5 months! That is the problem. The flying club owns the airplane so there is not owner. I really like the people in the club, and the costs, but these odd rules are starting to get to me.......
what are some of the others?

how many hours do you have racked up tim?
 

Greg01

Well-Known Member
Stupid question: Why can't you do your IR in the Warrior? Wouldn't it be cheaper for you?

Some rules can be weird. I was allowed by an insurance company to instruct him in his new Mooney Bravo for the 25 hours required by that insurance company before he could fly solo in it ...yet I couldn't fly his airplane by myself (I'm 18 years old, if it matters).

YF, I wouldn't be too worried about it. As young aviators (relatively speaking) we are faced with many challenges...and we do our best to overcome them.

Good luck.
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
Stupid question: Why can't you do your IR in the Warrior? Wouldn't it be cheaper for you?

Some rules can be weird. I was allowed by an insurance company to instruct him in his new Mooney Bravo for the 25 hours required by that insurance company before he could fly solo in it ...yet I couldn't fly his airplane by myself (I'm 18 years old, if it matters).

YF, I wouldn't be too worried about it. As young aviators (relatively speaking) we are faced with many challenges...and we do our best to overcome them.

Good luck.
Good question. Basically it is IFR certified, but it is not very conductive to IR training. The avionics are extremely old, and the GPS is absolutely terrible. The club claims it is perfectly fine, but no one ever seems to fly IFR in it.
 

Greg01

Well-Known Member
There's nothing wrong with getting your IR in an airplane that doesn't have a GPS (or a good one). Honestly, in my opinion, you'd be better off learning without one because it teaches you how to maintain situational awareness in your head. Also, it's easier to go from a basic trainer to one with a GPS than vice versa...the GPS can spoil you.

Indeed we are going the way of the GPS and TAA aircraft. However, I still have my students spend time in an airplane with just a couple of VORs and maybe a DME.

Again, just my advice: train in the airplane that is cheaper but still capable. The avionics might be old, but if they still work and are legal I see no problem with that.

Of course, the decision is yours.

Again, good luck with whatever you choose.

Greg
 

Wolfy

Well-Known Member
The less functioning in the airplane, the less you can get quizzed on during the checkride. ;)
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
The way you wrote it - it appears - that you're saying ONLY a Private pilot can fly the 182.

Is this correct or did you mean a Private certificate holder or greater (Commercial, ATP)?

Restricting the use of an airplane only to Private certificate holders when, more than likely, your club has Commercially rated pilots as members as well seems a little silly.
 
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