HR 5900 Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010

cptcrt777

Well-Known Member
SOOOOOO. Just a question to throw out to everyone. 1500 hours for a pilot to be even considered is in my opinon a recipe for a shortage. From what I've been told from certain high-up people in a 121 flight department, its gonna look ugly soon. What is everyone's take on the new rule? Will it work? and more importantly, will it be repealed??
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
Define "shortage"

There are thousands upon thousands of pilots qualified under the new rules. I doubt any will want jobs at regionals that they didn't want last year.
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
A shortage of pilots willing to work for current conditions is inevitable. The question is how airline management will deal with it. I suspect that "insourcing" back to mainline carriers is going to be their only viable solution.
 

Patrick

Well-Known Member
A shortage of pilots willing to work for current conditions is inevitable. The question is how airline management will deal with it. I suspect that "insourcing" back to mainline carriers is going to be their only viable solution.
Let's hope so.
 

SpiraMirabilis

Possible Subversive
A shortage of pilots willing to work for current conditions is inevitable. The question is how airline management will deal with it. I suspect that "insourcing" back to mainline carriers is going to be their only viable solution.
Here is hoping. Working for a regional airline is pretty bad, even the nice ones with fair pay and good work rules. The specter of not "owning" your own flying will haunt you every day. Will this the day that mainline partner X either doesn't renew their contract (or in the case of Delta manages to weasle out of the existing one early?)
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
A shortage of pilots willing to work for current conditions is inevitable. The question is how airline management will deal with it. I suspect that "insourcing" back to mainline carriers is going to be their only viable solution.
Scope erosion seems to be the answer for management. Delta pilots already caved with UniCal supposedly right on their heels. We shall see.
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
We still have to get through the wave of people that were in training when this was first announced. The idea of waiting 2-3 years to get to a regional would hinder future people.
 

Cloud Surfer

All Roads lead to Trantor
Well, I don't know about the vast majority of you folks, but I reserve the right to sit back, and to watch the show with some popcorn on the side if anything should happen. I mean, who can know for certain whether a shortage will ensue or not? If it does, all right then, I reckon that it can't hurt any of us. Perhaps it may change the status quo a little. If it doesn't, then things will go on just as they currently have been lately. What matters to me is the worst case scenario of there not appearing a shortage, and whether I still want to walk down this chaotic path. And for the sake of all things holy, I just hope to the all-mighty that none of you chose to enter this field because of that dumb old "shortage" rumor which has been floating around for about 30 years now...because you may not like what you see, should one NOT develop.
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
Scope erosion seems to be the answer for management. Delta pilots already caved with UniCal supposedly right on their heels. We shall see.
Delta pilots didn't "cave." They got scope improvements. Reduction of the number of outsourced airplanes = good thing.
 

Jet

Well-Known Member
Define "shortage"

There are thousands upon thousands of pilots qualified under the new rules. I doubt any will want jobs at regionals that they didn't want last year.
Have you even been to a regional? I'm working under what some consider one of the worst contracts in the industry and I love the job. I'll make over $30k on first year pay, have half of the month off, fly an automated, easy to fly jet with overnights in the largest cities in the US. Most of the people hating life are the ones trying to commute on reserve.

To the OP. I believe the requirement is to have an ATP. The requirements to obtain an ATP might be amended to something lower than 1500 hrs.
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
Have you even been to a regional? I'm working under what some consider one of the worst contracts in the industry and I love the job. I'll make over $30k on first year pay, have half of the month off, fly an automated, easy to fly jet with overnights in the largest cities in the US. Most of the people hating life are the ones trying to commute on reserve.
Incoming!
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
Have you even been to a regional? I'm working under what some consider one of the worst contracts in the industry and I love the job. I'll make over $30k on first year pay, have half of the month off, fly an automated, easy to fly jet with overnights in the largest cities in the US. Most of the people hating life are the ones trying to commute on reserve.

To the OP. I believe the requirement is to have an ATP. The requirements to obtain an ATP might be amended to something lower than 1500 hrs.
The thing is, if you have an ATP, there's a good number of jobs that you are at least really close to qualifying for that are better, IMO, and if like he said, they were qualified last year, why would they suddenly change their mind this year? Nothing about the pay or QOL has changed for the better that an outsider can see.
 

ross9238

Well-Known Member
A shortage of pilots willing to work for current conditions is inevitable. The question is how airline management will deal with it. I suspect that "insourcing" back to mainline carriers is going to be their only viable solution.
Here's to hoping that this becomes true.

Have you even been to a regional? I'm working under what some consider one of the worst contracts in the industry and I love the job. I'll make over $30k on first year pay, have half of the month off, fly an automated, easy to fly jet with overnights in the largest cities in the US.
Trip is that you?
 

mshunter

Well-Known Member
Have you even been to a regional? I'm working under what some consider one of the worst contracts in the industry and I love the job. I'll make over $30k on first year pay, have half of the month off, fly an automated, easy to fly jet with overnights in the largest cities in the US. Most of the people hating life are the ones trying to commute on reserve.

To the OP. I believe the requirement is to have an ATP. The requirements to obtain an ATP might be amended to something lower than 1500 hrs.

Ahh, another youthful mindset happy making a wage that I simply couldn't make work. Good luck. I hope you survive all the turmoil to find that very thin silver lining left in aviation. We're all trying... we're all trying.
 

Blackhawk

Well-Known Member
Yes there will be a shortage. Then there won't be a shortage. Then there will be a shortage again. This is nothing new and has been the case for decades. The shortage was so bad in the '60s for a while that some major airlines (such as United), hired 0 time pilots and paid for their training. I remember talking to a guy who, when hired by United, was told he would be a captain within a year. 12 years later he was still on the panel (for the young ones that is where you sit sideways and look at system gauges all day). I was told 8 years or more to upgrade in 1998. A year later I upgraded.
If you want to fly for a living then do so. Will the pay be great? Not always. Will some of the management suck? Of course. Will you face furloughs? Probably. But in the scheme of life it is not a bad job. As I've written before I've had jobs that suck. Flying was not one of them.

http://www.alpa.org/portals/alpa/magazine/2001/Feb2001_ShortHistory.htm
 

SteveCostello

My member is well-known.
I'm not close to being a professional pilot yet, but the one thing that I've learned is predictable about an aviation career is how unpredictable it is. Long term planning means no more than about a year out.
 
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