good private pilot ground school kit

Shiftace

Beating up the pattern in a Piper.
Hello friends.

looking to start my flying in January. Just wondering what is a good private pilot kit - the ones like Cessna or Kings school?

Anyone have any experience or thoughts on using these? which one is recommended!

Cheers

Sunny
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
I find kits to just be a way to slap a bigger price tag on things you dont necessarily need.

If you are the type of person that can learn from simple reading I HIGHLY recommend just using the FAA publications, which are available in PDF format for free from the FAA. Links

Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Airplane Flying Handbook

Aeronautical Information Manual

This is not to say that the kits do not contain good materials, just simply that if you want to save some cash there are good and effective ways to do it.
 

Hckey2477

Well-Known Member
:yeahthat: + the Jeppesen. It's a little more expensive, but Has some really good info + Nice Shinny Pictures :) Also Don't forget the Aviation Weather Services book.
 

Holocene

Well-Known Member
I find kits to just be a way to slap a bigger price tag on things you dont necessarily need.

If you are the type of person that can learn from simple reading I HIGHLY recommend just using the FAA publications, which are available in PDF format for free from the FAA. Links

Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Airplane Flying Handbook

Aeronautical Information Manual

This is not to say that the kits do not contain good materials, just simply that if you want to save some cash there are good and effective ways to do it.
Well said. The "kits" seem to be a bit of a joke, and I never really understood their purpose.

Anyway, for PP ground school, here's one example:

Rod Machado's Prive Pilot Handbook
Gleim Private Pilot written test workbook.
FAR/AIM
Plotter
E6B flight computer
Sectionals for your area

All of that is more than enough, and I bet it is all cheaper than a "kit".
 

Hckey2477

Well-Known Member
I Second the Gleim. It has all the answers to the knowledge test. Hit it hard, and you should have no problem getting a score in the 90-100 percent range
 

Holocene

Well-Known Member
I Second the Gleim. It has all the answers to the knowledge test. Hit it hard, and you should have no problem getting a score in the 90-100 percent range
What's great about the Gleim books is that they are divided into chapters and you can use them as a supplement to your textbooks. Meaning, read your textbooks, and then go through and test yourself with the Gleim. Works great for knowing whether or not you really understand what you need to know. This is what I am currently doing for IFR.
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
:yeahthat: + the Jeppesen. It's a little more expensive, but Has some really good info + Nice Shinny Pictures :) Also Don't forget the Aviation Weather Services book.
:yeahthat: I just bought the Jeppesen PVT and Instrument/Commercial cause my checkride is in 4 months and it's the best ive seen
 

BCTAv8r

Well-Known Member
My parents got me the Jeppesen PPL kit a couple of years ago and I pretty much only used the text book. I wish I knew about the free online publications beforehand.
 

Shiftace

Beating up the pattern in a Piper.
Cool!

I think Jeppesen is what the school has us use anyway. I have heard a lot of good stuff about the Gleim books too.

cheers

Sunny
 

OldTownPilot

Well-Known Member
I teach out of Kirshner's book. Its very good for the flying parts. I also use the ASA test prep book, as I find the text parts that it provides are better than the Gliem books.

No real point of buying a 'kit' If you are taking a formal ground school or are flying heavy at the same time.
 

TallFlyer

Well-Known Member
Ditto the Jeppesen. Also the Rod Machado book which breaks things down in some unique ways.

Also, depending on far you're planning on going, check out this. It'll really help you on your knowledge tests.
 

TallFlyer

Well-Known Member
Everything Explained is also a good book.
I was going to say that as well but that might be better after one has finished their private or starting on their instrument.

That all said as a professional aviator that's the first book I turn to when I have a question to answer.
 

Hckey2477

Well-Known Member
What's great about the Gleim books is that they are divided into chapters and you can use them as a supplement to your textbooks. Meaning, read your textbooks, and then go through and test yourself with the Gleim. Works great for knowing whether or not you really understand what you need to know. This is what I am currently doing for IFR.
I agree. This is what I did. I would read a chapter in the gleim, then read the subject in the jeppy. After that I would take the test.
 

slushie

C56X ATP CFII MEI
FAA Pubs (FREE!) and the Jeppesen manual for thorough knowledge.
Gleim for the slam-it-into-your-brain test preparation method.

The kits are dumb. I promise. They say you're "saving" on the kit, but in reality you'ree buying stuff you don't need. If your school requires it, that's the only reason to get the kit. (and I'd argue about it).

For the Jepp manual, search online for "Private Pilot Manual" or ask around here if someone has the newest edition.
 

n57flyguy

Well-Known Member
FAA Pubs (FREE!) and the Jeppesen manual for thorough knowledge.
Gleim for the slam-it-into-your-brain test preparation method.

The kits are dumb. I promise. They say you're "saving" on the kit, but in reality you'ree buying stuff you don't need. If your school requires it, that's the only reason to get the kit. (and I'd argue about it).

For the Jepp manual, search online for "Private Pilot Manual" or ask around here if someone has the newest edition.

I agree, I never got the my flight schools ASA one. I think in the Jepp kit there is more usless stuff than the ASA, which is only around $100.
I recomend:
-Gliems PPL test prep
-Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
-AIM
-Airplane flying handbook
-E6b (a REAL one)
-Sectionals
-Plotter
 
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