any former IT professionals out there?

Hypersonic_Wings

New Member
I've been thinking about majoring in IT for a degree. I want to know if there are any commercial pilots here that used to work in that field. What was it like? How long did you have to work in IT to finance your training and obtain your licenses/ratings? What was the pay like? Quality of life?
The schools I've been looking at are Heald College, University of Phoenix and Devry University. Any alumnis or current students at these schools? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

SlantG

Well-Known Member
BTDT, hated it. It did pay for most of the ratings, but wouldn't go back for anything. I'd even work at Mesa first.
 

Hypersonic_Wings

New Member
What does "BTDT" stand for? The reason I've been thinking about IT is because I find computers to be interesting and a lot of people on here advised not to pursue an aviation degree. Are there any majors out there which is better than IT that is adaptable and survivable to last long enough to pursue PPL to CPL or CFI?
 

darrenf

resident denizen
What does "BTDT" stand for? The reason I've been thinking about IT is because I find computers to be interesting and a lot of people on here advised not to pursue an aviation degree. Are there any majors out there which is better than IT that is adaptable and survivable to last long enough to pursue PPL to CPL or CFI?
Been
There
Done
That
 

EnnisLynch

New Member
I am currently still an I.T. professional and it can be a very lucrative method to bank some savings to pay for flying. If you are older than your mid-20's a degree really isn't required to jump into to the I.T. In this world experience is still key with education a bonus.

If you had the intelligence and tenacity to sit down and learn to program you could have a contract making $35 an hour 40 hours a week in about 8 weeks as a beginner. Not too shabby, it only goes up from there. If you are good, however, it is not seniority in I.T. but talent and experience so choose your road wisely. One last note about an education, at least on the East coast, it is an active discussion about Universities regarding quality and effectiveness. If you are going to bank on your education to get you in and not experience and ability it had better be a well regarding (not well advertised) school that offers a solid education in the specific field you are looking.

I can't really tell you if it works out that well for paying for flight training as it has taken me over a year and a half to get to the point where I can get my PPL. Sadly, money was never the issue only constant travel. I wish I could offer more advice but this topic like many others can quickly become a novel.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
Ennis has it pretty much right. I'm in telecom, which is the bastard child of the IT industry, although it's getting a little more respect these days since us voice guys have been encroaching on the data side.

The really good-paying jobs on this side are in two places - Sales is one, and Sales Engineering at the manufacturer level is another. You can be an IT grunt and make really good money, but the hours can be long, it can be frustrating, and if you're doing your job well, you're transparent. No one ever is happy to see you when you're troubleshooting, you know?

That said, if you develop a decent skill set with equal balance of networking, (LAN/WAN/MAN/MPLS), OSs (Windows/Linux), and SIP Telephony (it's a voice protocol) you can write yourself a nice ticket in the high-five figures and low sixes without a degree. If you've got a masochistic streak, pick up a few Cisco Certs along the way and you can make some good dough - especially on the network security track.

I'm too lazy for that, though. :)
 

tgrayson

New Member
I've been thinking about majoring in IT for a degree.
Don't be fooled that "liking computers" means you'll like working in the IT field. This is the misconception that entraps engineers into a lifelong hated profession. While in school you learn about lots of cool stuff and you have a free hand to "play". The new ideas you encounter are stimulating.

Most real world jobs aren't like that. You're sitting in a 5 x 5 cube all day, often with little human contact. Most companies are interested in your generating something that works, quickly, and aren't that interested in your being stimulated.

Now, if you want to do this just to earn money to fly, different story. Your average wage rate will probably be higher than most other things you can study. However, don't expect $35/hour. Maybe that's true in Florida, but not where I am, at least for people with no experience. Your skills coming right out of college are going to be minimal. Some interns that I worked with recently got jobs paying about $15/hour. I'm sure it will go up fast.
 

pilot4500

IT Manager/ Former Cirrus Charter Pilot
I am very interested in getting into the IT field. I guess you could call me a reverse career changer. Unfortunately, I don't have a degree but I am willing earn one if that is what it takes. All of my experience has been flying airplanes and teaching other people to fly airplanes. What can I do to try and break into the IT field?
 

Atreyu

Well-Known Member
Don't be fooled that "liking computers" means you'll like working in the IT field. This is the misconception that entraps engineers into a lifelong hated profession. While in school you learn about lots of cool stuff and you have a free hand to "play". The new ideas you encounter are stimulating.

Most real world jobs aren't like that. You're sitting in a 5 x 5 cube all day, often with little human contact. Most companies are interested in your generating something that works, quickly, and aren't that interested in your being stimulated.
:yeahthat: Im a network security analyst and want to make the jump to a professional aviation job. I'd recommend getting a degree in computer science or management information systems from a reputable school. It paid for my flight training as i went along up through the instructor certs over the course of about 3 years. I like computers too but not really my job, its ok but it does pay well and i can work from home if need be. I can tell you its a profession that you should have no problem finding a decent paying gig, at least in the northeast but you'll be in a cube watching planes flying overhead if you lucky enough to have a window like me :p
Good luck with your choice.
 

tgrayson

New Member
Unfortunately, I don't have a degree but I am willing earn one if that is what it takes.
You don't need a 4-year degree, but you almost certainly need some sort of training. An associate's degree would probably be enough, which you could get from your community college. There are a fair number of entry-level jobs available out there.

Although I suppose in theory you could self-train and find a job, it's a tough road and you'd have problems establishing your credibility with a prospective employer.
 

Hypersonic_Wings

New Member
Thanks everyone for answering my questions and for your advices. It'll help paint a better picture for me of the IT world and what to expect.
 

parmandjack

New Member
I've been thinking about majoring in IT for a degree. I want to know if there are any commercial pilots here that used to work in that field. What was it like? How long did you have to work in IT to finance your training and obtain your licenses/ratings? What was the pay like? Quality of life?
The schools I've been looking at are Heald College, University of Phoenix and Devry University. Any alumnis or current students at these schools? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Hiya Hyper...

I'm going to cut and paste a response I just made fro DFW on another thread. DFW is in Aviation but looking to quit and go back to IT... I'm in the IT field, so maybe what I told hime will enlighten you also... I'm not going to edit it, instead just cut/paste the whole thing, so please excuse anything that may seem not directed towards you..

Cheers.
 

parmandjack

New Member
I've been thinking about majoring in IT for a degree. I want to know if there are any commercial pilots here that used to work in that field. What was it like? How long did you have to work in IT to finance your training and obtain your licenses/ratings? What was the pay like? Quality of life?
The schools I've been looking at are Heald College, University of Phoenix and Devry University. Any alumnis or current students at these schools? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
As promised Hyper... btw... I'm a DeVry Grad.

***cut/paste***

Hi DFW. I too am in IT. I am also 45 years old. Unlike you though, I haven't yet tossed it aside for the Aviation career.... although thats what I had intended to do... I'm now in Raleigh for another IT gig, and am just wrapping up the TSA process for flight training approval....

What i wanted to say was this... I've been in love with flying all my life, and have 52 hours to my name.... I planned on switching careers, and had a long hard fight with my wife about it... however, after all is said and done, I, like you, weighed the pro's & con's, and an aviation career came up far short of my needs when compared to my IT career....

I have 4 young kids and a wife who like to see me every night... my IT career makes it possible, an Aviation career would not

I like to plan my weekends and every other day in my schedule according to my family needs and plans... IT makes this possible, Aviation would not

I like to maintain a certain level of comfort, and not just get by on subsistance living... IT makes this possible, Aviation would not...

I like to drive my Land Rover, and provide my wife and kids with a nice big house, and spoil them all rotten (after all, I won't be around forever, and I could die today!)... my IT career makes this possible, an Aviation career would not....

Like you, I've been in IT since 1993 until today, so after 15 years I make a steady mid-6-figure income, don't carry a pager, don't work weekends, don't work nights, am not on call..etc... IT makes this possible, Aviation cannot offer the same

I have decided that I'll get my commercial and instructor ratings to fill my need for professional aviation by instructing on weekends etc, but I also plan on buying my own twin and flying for fun.... an IT career makes this possible, an Aviation career does not....

What I'm saying DFW, is that rather than focusing on the "fix" that you want, or I want, in our desire to fly, focus on what your family "needs", rather than making them do without so your (my, our) flying needs are fulfilled)... They NEED an at home dad, more than we "need" to fly for a low paying corporation (don't forget, the Airline mgrs and execs don't share your financial or schedule pains, and they cannot even fly the planes nor risk their lives on a daily basis!).... fly for fun to get your fix.... Your IT career will get to the point where you can pick a job that has only day shift, and no on call requirements... there are plenty out there, just be choosy up front... the money will come again.. but to make it come quicker, stick to internetworking (ie: Cisco certs) as opposed to MCSE's.. they are truly a dime a dozen and don't offer high $$$'s .... find a role that will let you work on project and lead some of them, then make the transition to IT Project Management... thats where BIG $$$'s are... and thats exactly what I did.. Her eis the path I took as I learned and figured out how to cash in big in the IT industry... my certification path below as an example....

CNA 4.1, CNA 4.11, CNA 5.0, CNE 5, Master CNE, CNE 6, CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP, CCIE Written, ITIL, PMP..... still a PMP today.....

I hear ya DFW , and I feel your pain... but family, kids, wives, come first, not our desire to fly... money can buy that for us in a recreational way...

I think you're making the right decision to get back into IT... You AND your family will have more money in your pocket, MUCH more quality family time, AND, your family will be able to enjoy flying with DAD every weekend.... can you imagine the thrill the kids will get ? :D

Thats my two cents anyway.. I hope it helps... :bandit:

Cheers.
 

skidz

Well-Known Member
I used to be in IT field of telecommunications back in hmm...1996?, frame relay networks and stuff, I wanted to get more into Cisco and Microsoft certs, but then after falling a sleep several times trying to learn about Windows NT and 2000 servers I realized that stuff is so damn boring I couldn't stand it. I wouldn't mind getting those six figures, but man...I just couldn't do it. :) I'll take it back on Cisco though, it wasn't as boring as Microsoft :D
 

berge7f9

Well-Known Member
What would be a career in the IT industry that would most likely have jobs that would allow one to work at home/internet etc?

This is coming from someone who wants to stay in the regional industry, but have a side job to work concurrently with the present job i.e. working on reserve or on overnights.
 

Joe Gremlin

Well-Known Member
Don't be fooled that "liking computers" means you'll like working in the IT field. This is the misconception that entraps engineers into a lifelong hated profession.
You know it's funny but that is almost the exact same conversation I have with every young kid who tells me that he wants to become a professional pilot. I tell them don't be fooled that liking to fly means you'll like working as a pilot. This is the misconception that entraps pilots into a lifelong hated profession. I know this because when I worked on the ramp at an international airport, I used to go drinking with lots of them after work. Those were some bitter mother ####ers who would stare into their beer and talk about how they were pre-med or halfway through law school when they decided they just had to fly for a living. Now they were looking at 45 and still spending most of their free time in ratty crash pads while guys they went to school with were living in new houses and spending every weekend playing with expensive toys.

When I was in my late 20's, I loved (note the d on the end of that word) to fly and computers were just something I was ok at fiddling with but didn't get too excited about. Then I started flying for a living and acquired that d at the end of the word love in the previous sentence. Now I fix PCs for a living and I couldn't love my job more. And finally, after about 5 years, I'm starting to get interested in flying again. But I'll never love it like I did before I tried to make a living doing it.

Not everyone is cut out to like flying for a living. Not everyone is cut out to like IT for a living. But the one thing I've learned is that whether or not you like doing something as a hobby can have very little to do with whether or not you'll like doing it for a living.
 
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