USMC demand for jet pilots

DaveC

Well-Known Member
I've always wanted to fly military, but my vision kept me out. Now that they're granting waivers for PRK, I'm trying to join as a pilot. It looks like the Marines are my best shot at a pilot slot. Plus some of my friends went in a few years ago on ground contracts, and from what they told me it sounds like the Marine Corps is where I want to go in life.

I'm 23 with an aeronautics degree and 1000+ hours. From talking with recruiters I shouldn't have any problem getting into OCS an aviation contract after getting PRK.

I'm happy to fly helos, but jets would be my preference. Does anyone know about how many Marine pilots are going into jets right now, and how many are expected in the next few years?
 

Blackhawk

Well-Known Member
I've always wanted to fly military, but my vision kept me out. Now that they're granting waivers for PRK, I'm trying to join as a pilot. It looks like the Marines are my best shot at a pilot slot. Plus some of my friends went in a few years ago on ground contracts, and from what they told me it sounds like the Marine Corps is where I want to go in life.

I'm 23 with an aeronautics degree and 1000+ hours. From talking with recruiters I shouldn't have any problem getting into OCS an aviation contract after getting PRK.

I'm happy to fly helos, but jets would be my preference. Does anyone know about how many Marine pilots are going into jets right now, and how many are expected in the next few years?
This is always a crap shoot. Anything anyone tells you about the next few years for the demand of military pilots in specific airframes is speculation. I've seen times when the Navy and Marines were putting flight school graduates on the street. Then, I've seen times when the Army was over strength pilots and the Navy/Marines were so short that Army pilots straight out of flight school were given inter-service transfers and went right through flight school again for the Navy. Even if the Marines have a demand for jet pilots, if the pipe line is backed up when you graduate from flight school you might find yourself flying helos.
 

RPJ

Well-Known Member
Think very hard about joining. Is this really what you wanna do? Do you really understand the commitment involved? Do you completely grasp what your role will be within the service? If so then more power to you.

If you wanna fly helos then go Army. You can get in with a LASIK waiver, which is a better procedure than PRK and you can get a guaranteed slot in writing as a WO flying rotor-wing before you ever leave to boot camp.
 

Velocipede

New Member
Don't forget, every Marine officer is a platoon leader. Once you make it through OCS, you'll have a YEAR of ground officer training before you even see a flight line. And your eventual airframe depends on your grades in flight school. Hope you have some flying experience, because most guys who get jets are already experienced pilots.
 

N826AW

Snooki's Baby Daddy
I'm giving some very serious thought to getting my eyes fixed and putting in a packet for a Marine OCS aviation slot. I'm considering Army WOFT but I think I'd like to be an officer.
 

H46Bubba

Well-Known Member
I've always wanted to fly military, but my vision kept me out. Now that they're granting waivers for PRK, I'm trying to join as a pilot. It looks like the Marines are my best shot at a pilot slot. Plus some of my friends went in a few years ago on ground contracts, and from what they told me it sounds like the Marine Corps is where I want to go in life.

I'm 23 with an aeronautics degree and 1000+ hours. From talking with recruiters I shouldn't have any problem getting into OCS an aviation contract after getting PRK.

I'm happy to fly helos, but jets would be my preference. Does anyone know about how many Marine pilots are going into jets right now, and how many are expected in the next few years?
Your best bet for a flight slot is through the Navy. The Navy has far more pilot slots than the Marines. Almost everywhere you need to go is in one place...Pensacola! AOCS-API-and initial flight training.
 

H46Bubba

Well-Known Member
I'm giving some very serious thought to getting my eyes fixed and putting in a packet for a Marine OCS aviation slot. I'm considering Army WOFT but I think I'd like to be an officer.
Warrant Officers are officers. Ian and can tell you the difference between the two as you progress through a career.
 

granlistillo

Well-Known Member
Warrant Officers are officers. Ian and can tell you the difference between the two as you progress through a career.
Chief Warrants are commissioned officers. I thought that the W1 grade was a traditional warrant officer and not commissioned.

The Navy had their last W1 "warrant" warrant officers for LPN nurses back in the 1990s.

Either way, they are "officers".
 

granlistillo

Well-Known Member
Your best bet for a flight slot is through the Navy. The Navy has far more pilot slots than the Marines. Almost everywhere you need to go is in one place...Pensacola! AOCS-API-and initial flight training.
AOCS went away in 1994. Was always interesting when a DI would show up and watch you in different aviation related evolutions. Ours watched us in the altitude chamber, but at least no one freaked out.

After merging with OCS, several changes to the program, OCS is very similar to the old AOCS apparently, but with all the aviation events occuring in post commission API.
 

bunk22

Well-Known Member
What community you go to out of Primary will depend #1 on the needs of the service; #2 will depend on performance. You might very well be top of your squadron that week, off all three in Whiting but if there are no tailhook slots, you will get what is available. The fact is, about 75% of all Marine Corps pilots are helo pilots. Even though the odds aren't in your favor, there is still a chance. If you have what it takes to make it through, your experience will only help. If you don't have it, your experience won't matter. I'm an IP down here at Whiting with VT-6 and I've seen both. Also seen quite a few SNA's with nothing but IFS smoke the program. If you want it, apply and see what happens. Set your goal and do your best.

Go over to www.airwarriors.com for a search about the Navy/Marince Corps flight program, the website is about Naval Aviation. Just tread lightly, search before you ask a question that may have been asked and answered many, many times. Do not ask what percentage get jets, it will get you banned.

If you wanna fly helos then go Army. You can get in with a LASIK waiver, which is a better procedure than PRK and you can get a guaranteed slot in writing as a WO flying rotor-wing before you ever leave to boot camp.
How is LASIK better? Due to how the eye is cut? From my understanding, it's the same laser procedure, how the docs (machines really) cut the eye is different. A few Navy docs that I've spoken to are saying PRK is the better of the two based on the long term effects. That is second hand info (though right from a few flight surgeons) so take it for what it's worth.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
Didn't the USMC do away with the WO program? That's what my recruiter told me back in 1991....
 

bunk22

Well-Known Member
Didn't the USMC do away with the WO program? That's what my recruiter told me back in 1991....
As far as aviation, there are no WO pilots or WSO's. As for the Navy, they have opened up the flying WO program. It's very small, I think only 10 a year and all are prior enlisted. We've got 2 of them at VT-6 and they can only fly helo's or P-3's.
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
How is LASIK better? Due to how the eye is cut? From my understanding, it's the same laser procedure, how the docs (machines really) cut the eye is different. A few Navy docs that I've spoken to are saying PRK is the better of the two based on the long term effects. That is second hand info (though right from a few flight surgeons) so take it for what it's worth.
The Navy won't accept LASIK for a pilot spot. It has a lot to do with the way the eye is cut, and the forces put on the eye during an ejection. When the pilot project (no pun intended) started for PRK in the Navy, it was offered only to pilots and seals. Latter expanded to FO's. So I would be sure to check with a flight surgeon from the services to see what is allowed.
 

bunk22

Well-Known Member
The Navy won't accept LASIK for a pilot spot. It has a lot to do with the way the eye is cut, and the forces put on the eye during an ejection. When the pilot project (no pun intended) started for PRK in the Navy, it was offered only to pilots and seals. Latter expanded to FO's. So I would be sure to check with a flight surgeon from the services to see what is allowed.
On 7 May 08, the Navy is accepting LASIK for pilots...a study program (post wings I'm assuming). I'm very familiar with the PRK study program as I was one of the Navy pilots who had it done, back in Jan 03. For me, the PRK was a painful, excrutiating experience, at least for my right eye. Felt like someone had put a lighter up to my eyeball. For two days I was in some of the worst pain I've ever experienced in that right eye. Yet almost 6 year later, I still have 20/12 in that eye. About 20/17 in my left eye. My eyes were 20/20 for my first flight physical in 1992, but a weak 20/20. At NAMI the next year, going down to 20/25 and down from there. By 2000, my eyes held study at 20/80 but I forget the dioptic range or whatever it is called.
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
Chief Warrants are commissioned officers. I thought that the W1 grade was a traditional warrant officer and not commissioned.

The Navy had their last W1 "warrant" warrant officers for LPN nurses back in the 1990s.

Either way, they are "officers".
Warrant officers are not commissioned officers. W1-W5 are the warrant ranks, O1-O10 are the commissioned ranks. Yes, they are both officers, but it is apples and oranges. A warrant officer will not naturally promote into the commisioned ranks without the intervention of a board designed to select warrant officers to become commisioned officers. Those who make the transition are normally limited duty commisioned officers.
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
On 7 May 08, the Navy is accepting LASIK for pilots...a study program (post wings I'm assuming). I'm very familiar with the PRK study program as I was one of the Navy pilots who had it done, back in Jan 03. For me, the PRK was a painful, excrutiating experience, at least for my right eye. Felt like someone had put a lighter up to my eyeball. For two days I was in some of the worst pain I've ever experienced in that right eye. Yet almost 6 year later, I still have 20/12 in that eye. About 20/17 in my left eye. My eyes were 20/20 for my first flight physical in 1992, but a weak 20/20. At NAMI the next year, going down to 20/25 and down from there. By 2000, my eyes held study at 20/80 but I forget the dioptic range or whatever it is called.
What year were you commissioned?
 

MikeFavinger

Hubschrauber Flieger
Warrant Officers are officers. Ian and can tell you the difference between the two as you progress through a career.
Absolutely. Plus, we have a number of actual Warrant's who post on JC.

Warrant officers are not commissioned officers. W1-W5 are the warrant ranks, O1-O10 are the commissioned ranks. Yes, they are both officers, but it is apples and oranges. A warrant officer will not naturally promote into the commisioned ranks without the intervention of a board designed to select warrant officers to become commisioned officers. Those who make the transition are normally limited duty commisioned officers.
Though they are not "commissioned officers," they are appointed by commission:

The Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1986amended Title 10 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) to provide that Army Chief Warrant Officers shall be appointed by Commission. The primary purpose of the legislation was to equalize appointment procedures among the services. Chief Warrant Officers of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard had been commissioned for many years. Contrary to popular belief, the commissioning legislation was not a TWOS recommendation but a separate Army proposal. Further clarification of the role of an Army Warrant Officer, including the commissioned aspect, is found in FM 22-100.
"Warrant Officers are highly specialized, single-track specialty officers who receive their authority from the Secretary of the Army upon their initial appointment. However, Title 10 U.S.C. authorizes the commissioning of Warrant Officers (WO1) upon promotion to chief Warrant Officer (CW2). These commissioned Warrant Officers are direct representatives of the president of the United States. They derive their authority from the same source as commissioned officers but remain specialists, in contrast to commissioned officers, who are generalists. Warrant Officers can and do command detachments, units, activities, and vessels as well as lead, coach, train, and counsel subordinates. As leaders and technical experts, they provide valuable skills, guidance, and expertise to commanders and organizations in their particular field."
(Para A-3, Field Manual 22-100)
http://www.usawoa.org/woheritage/Hist_of_Army_WO.htm
 

bunk22

Well-Known Member
What community? I went through primary in 92.
I went to VT-27, selected E-2/C-2, went to VT-31 then VT-4 in Pensacola. Selected C-2's at VAW-120 and did two VRC-30 tours, an FRS VAW-120 tour :mad: and hated that tour (VAW NFO's would be the reason there). I was extended for 6 months at VRC-30 and had verbal orders to VT-9 in Meridian to fly T-2C Buckeye's as an IP. Days prior to deployment, the placement officer comes on down and gives me, in his words, the good news...the FRS needed a COD guy and I was it. But I'm not bitter :sarcasm::D Now I'm the OIC of the prep school for Royal Saudi Navy pilots and while flying as an IP with VT-6. Like you, was a t-notch guy who took forever to start API, then blew my knee out the first week of API, med down for another 9 months. Took forever to get through.
 
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