Training Between PPL and IR

JeffMSU

New Member
I'm wondering what is the best use of my flight time between getting my PPL and then starting my IR. I just graduated from college and have my PPL checkride this weekend :D and do to looking for a job (which could put me anywhere in the US) and not having a large sum of money sitting in my bank, I probably not start training for my IR until I know what's going on in my future.

What is the best way to use the flight time and ground time in between these two ratings. With all of the rides i will be giving friends and family members in the weeks to come I want to make the most out of my time spent in the air and on the ground. Any good books to pick up or things to do while in the air or with some free time during the day. Thanks for the suggestions!
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
Build that XC PIC time. You need 50 XC PIC time for your instrument, I had ~8 after my PPL.
 

pwttogfk

Well-Known Member
You could also find a Part 141 school and start your instrument training right away; they don't have the 50 hour PIC X-C requirement and you could always do the ground school and save up money to fly
 

TGatch

Well-Known Member
I'm wondering what is the best use of my flight time between getting my PPL and then starting my IR. I just graduated from college and have my PPL checkride this weekend :D and do to looking for a job (which could put me anywhere in the US) and not having a large sum of money sitting in my bank, I probably not start training for my IR until I know what's going on in my future.

What is the best way to use the flight time and ground time in between these two ratings. With all of the rides i will be giving friends and family members in the weeks to come I want to make the most out of my time spent in the air and on the ground. Any good books to pick up or things to do while in the air or with some free time during the day. Thanks for the suggestions!

I would suggest starting your training right away. I wouldn't do part 141, I didn't and a lot of people don't like it as much. Just personal opinion. If you do start your IR soon though, try and make your training flights to be XC time, so you're not only utilizing hood time but you're building your required 50 hours all in the same lesson. You can save a lot of money doing it like that instead of getting all your XC time and then starting your training. Other than that I'd suggest start studying for your Instrument written. There is a lot of knowledge to cover. I wouldn't suggest doing anything other than flying the plane while you're up there. You have people on board you should devote all your attention to flying. Remember it's a license to learn. Have fun with it!
 

JPilot9

Well-Known Member
Flight time - Fly with anyone you feel comfortable taking up, and try to find a higher time pilot to go fly with, too. You may learn a few things from another pilot, and you can split some of the costs. Maybe fly one or two longer cross countries of 150 miles or more. Go somewhere new.

Ground time - Become an airport bum. Go sit on the ramp with your handheld and listen to the radio chatter. Ask people arriving where they flew in from; pilots always love to talk about themselves and their planes. Also, read Stick and Rudder.
 

XLR99

Well-Known Member
+1 for going pt 61, making lessons into 3-4 leg flights with at least one over 50NM so the whole lesson is XC time; also do it at night, filed IFR, and in actual IMC to whatever extent possible.
You'll need to do some local flights for time efficiency, but you and your CFII can work something out. Also if there's someplace with a PCATD, or an FTD you can use some sim time.
Also, as someone else suggested, do a few longer VFR XC flights now to gain confidence. Use flight following to get used to talking to approach, go to towered fields, etc. Make one of them long enough to fulfill the requirement for your Comm. XC as well so you don't need to do that later on.
 
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