SWA Jumpseat

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
I work for a small 135 cargo op which just got a reciprocal "jumpseat" agreement with SWA. The wrinkle is we're not in CASS, and not likely to be any time soon, so we ride in the cabin only. I know enough from long veteran status on the message boards w/r/t ettiquette (ie. Board last, stop by the cockpit and ASK to ride, don't wear your Hell's Angels colors, dig down in your medecine cabinet, find the razor, remember how to use it, thank the crew on the way out if their workload permits, etc etc). What I don't know is how likely one is to get where they're going and back with cabin only status, especially on SWA, as they seem to run a pretty full bus fairly often. What's the best way to check the loads, and how much faith ought one put in them?

Thanks.
 

jtrain609

Anarcho-Bidenist
I haven't sat up front on Southwest very often, like I can count the number of times I did so on one hand. I also don't think I've ever been bumped, but with that I HAVE ridden on the perch (behind the captains seat) before, and that was one of the most uncomfortable experiences of my life.

Now, I've also gotta admit I was going on city pairs that had like 15 flights a day or something stupid like that, so there were a lot of seats.

I wouldn't bet your job on being able to get back from where ever you're going, but if you've got a few days, have fun with it.
 

KLB

Well-Known Member
I fly on SWA all of the time and sit up front quite often. But we're CASS so its no problem. Do you have SWA's non rev number to check loads? I'll PM it to you if you don't have it.
 

Alchemy

Well-Known Member
I work for a small 135 cargo op which just got a reciprocal "jumpseat" agreement with SWA. The wrinkle is we're not in CASS, and not likely to be any time soon, so we ride in the cabin only. I know enough from long veteran status on the message boards w/r/t ettiquette (ie. Board last, stop by the cockpit and ASK to ride, don't wear your Hell's Angels colors, dig down in your medecine cabinet, find the razor, remember how to use it, thank the crew on the way out if their workload permits, etc etc). What I don't know is how likely one is to get where they're going and back with cabin only status, especially on SWA, as they seem to run a pretty full bus fairly often. What's the best way to check the loads, and how much faith ought one put in them?

Thanks.
Call 866-359-7967. They will make a reservation for you and tell you what the loads look like. This is the southwest non-rev line. Best of luck.
 

doug_or

Well-Known Member
WN runs some of the lowest load factors in the industry. If you're not trying to see mom the day before turkey day or go to Orlando during spring break Southwest is probably your best bet no matter how many other options you have. The people at the above listed # are always helpful and should be able to give you a good idea of loads. Not a bad idea to ask them if there are any non-revs listed as well.
 

Lowlevel

Heehee.. Member
I travel almost exclusively on B6 to JFK (to work) and Southwest to Philly. Both of these airlines have the nicest crews I have run into. I am usually in Philly once a week and never had a problem going/coming from Philly to home in FL on Southwest. I see someone has given the non-rev number. Call that before heading to the airport and they will list you and let you know what the loads look like. When you get to the airport (at least in RSW, MCO, TPA, and PHL) you go through security to the SWA Customer Service Desk (gate) and let them know you are non-reving (Ticket counter doesn't do non-rev). Some gate agents will let you preboard so that you are done with the "Hi, can I ride?" before the passengers head down and you can't get out of the cockpit. I usually just head to the very back row and take a seat, this gets me out of the way of the crowds that, for some reason, all want to sit up front in the aisle and window seats, leaving all the middle seats empty :) Just ask if it is possible, it makes it much easier. Unless the flight is REAL full, they usually say it is ok.
One extra thing I do, because the crews are so nice, is help them clean the cabin. They almost always have quick turns and any help is appreciated.
I sure am going to miss being able to JS on these airlines :(
 

MattB

New Member
I almost never non rev on Airways but do very often on SWA, very very helpful. Crews are always incredibly friendly. I have yet to have to ride up front on numerous trips out of BWI to various destinations.
 

KLB

Well-Known Member
Another thing.

It is really encouraged that you list on the flights before showing up at the gate. It makes it easier on the gate agents I think. Some will tell you that it is required that you list before showing up at the gate.
 

MusketeerMan

Well-Known Member
I use them every week and they're the easiest to js on. Definitely list yourself ahead of time. They also prefer if you pre-board so you can talk to the CA first and you're not blocking the aisles or anything with your bags while you're talking up front.
 

Copperhed51

Well-Known Member
I had to ride up front on Southwest flights numerous times going from MCI-STL or MCI-STL. They are the only ones who fly that route and only do it around 7 or 8 times per day so it was usually packed. There were other times I had the pleasure of sitting inside some guy's fat rolls as he overflowed into my seat.

Anyway, I think the moral of the sotry here is that it just depends on the city pair you're trying to commute.

Oh, and I also sat in that perch thing behind the CA's seat one time. I couldn't get my left leg around to the side of the CA's seat and before we left I asked her if she could slide forward to let me get my leg around to the side of her seat and then she could slide it right back where it was. She said she couldn't do that for some stupid reason so the 250-pounder next to me and I hugged for the entire flight from STL to MCI. Unfortunately when we got to MCI there was a crazy-strong cell right over the airport so we had to hold for a while and eventually divert to Omaha. Luckily once the weather cleared up, we'd lost 2 people from the cabin so I was able to grab a seat in the back for the flight from OMA to MCI. Probably one of the worst experiences in my entire life but I was still grateful for the ride.
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
Ancient? All your companies 737 are the 700 models and state of the fracking art!

:confused:
You would think so, but no. Apparently you aren't familiar with the evolution of the 737 product line. Aren't you supposed to be a proud a.net nerd? ;)

The 737 has been kept in the dark ages for decades while technology on other fleets advanced, because SWA demanded that Boeing keep things standard across the models. So, the overhead panel on the 737-700s that we have is basically identical to the 737-200 panels from a bygone era. Very few things have been automated. My after start flow consists of three switches, since almost everything on the electronic Douglas is automated. The guys on the 737 are throwing switches left and right, though. The VNAV won't intercept a glide path, you have to tune radios, etc... Really, it's old technology. Our guys that have been flying the 717 for years have some difficulty switching over to the 737, because it's a lot more work.
 

Maximilian_Jenius

Super User
You would think so, but no. Apparently you aren't familiar with the evolution of the 737 product line. Aren't you supposed to be a proud a.net nerd? ;)

The 737 has been kept in the dark ages for decades while technology on other fleets advanced, because SWA demanded that Boeing keep things standard across the models. So, the overhead panel on the 737-700s that we have is basically identical to the 737-200 panels from a bygone era. Very few things have been automated. My after start flow consists of three switches, since almost everything on the electronic Douglas is automated. The guys on the 737 are throwing switches left and right, though. The VNAV won't intercept a glide path, you have to tune radios, etc... Really, it's old technology. Our guys that have been flying the 717 for years have some difficulty switching over to the 737, because it's a lot more work.
Wow...didn't know all that...
 
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