High-Altitude Endorsement

dahhcon

Well-Known Member
I'm kinda confused over this endorsement. When do you need this endorsement, and is it specific to one aircraft? or do you need it for each aircraft that fits the criteria?
 

Fins Up

Well-Known Member
What is this crapola? Sounds like a scam to me. I don't have such an endorsement on my certificate but I'm pretty sure I'm okay flying at FL390 with my company.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
I'm fairly certain that's covered by your PIC competency check under 121...
 

kiloalpha

Well-Known Member
Got mine in the B737 down in Houston. Comes free when you shell out the money to go through the Airline Training Orientation Program down there.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
OK, to answer your question (you should have just come down to my cubicle, lol). My understanding is if the aircraft is pressurized AND capable of operating above 25,000' you need the high altitude endorsement (a general endorsement that applies to any high-altitude airplane, just like your tailwheel, high performance, and complex) to ACT as PIC.
 

jhugz

#lighttwin Mafia
My understanding is if the aircraft is pressurized AND capable of operating above 25,000' you need the high altitude endorsement
I am to lazy to look it up right now but I am pretty sure the AND should be an OR.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
Well, it depends on how you read it. Now would be a good time for tgrayson...he seems to know these kind of things.
 

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
61.31 g

....no person may act as pilot in command of a pressurized aircraft (an aircraft that has a service ceiling or maximum operating altitude, whichever is lower, above 25,000 feet MSL), unless that person has received and logged ground training from an authorized instructor and obtained an endorsement in the person's logbook or training record from an authorized instructor who certifies the person has satisfactorily accomplished the ground training......
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
Got mine in the B737 down in Houston. Comes free when you shell out the money to go through the Airline Training Orientation Program down there.

ATOP isnt bad for 500 bucks, think of it as like 2 hrs in a multi a/c

and you get to fly a 738 sim!
 

Blip16

Well-Known Member
A Turbo 210's service ceiling is 270
is that for the pressurized one? the seneca is limited to 250 because it is unpressurized, it could climb higher than 250....


23.841, http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/tex...rgn=div8;view=text;node=14:1.0.1.3.10.4.85.69
(a) If certification for operation over 25,000 feet is requested, the airplane must be able to maintain a cabin pressure altitude of not more than 15,000 feet in event of any probable failure or malfunction in the pressurization system.
 

Hacker15e

Dunning–Kruger Observer
There are tons of military (and ex) airplanes that can do that. The Cessna T-37 is one of them that I've flown. Also, most of the WWII fighters like the Mustang can.
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
King Air A90-1 (I think). A lot of the really old King Airs (most of which are ex-military planes) are unpressurized but can go up to FL300.
 

Fins Up

Well-Known Member
I'm kinda confused over this endorsement. When do you need this endorsement, and is it specific to one aircraft? or do you need it for each aircraft that fits the criteria?
I think the question should be, why do you think you need this so-called high-altitude endorsement? Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you'll ever be asked for that endorsement on you resume or in an interview. I think if saw that on an applicant's resume I would laugh and toss it in the round file.
 
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