Colorblindness in the airlines

cessna2351

Well-Known Member
Hi everyone,

I have a very slight colorblindness between the colors of red and green. It is very slight and i was able to obtain a 3rd class medical this past summer with ease. I sometimes have trouble with the Ishihara tests (the circles with the colored dots and you have to find the number). Will this stop me from obtaining a 1st class medical.

I can't reiderate enough how slight this colorblindness is...i think its technical name is "mild duetoronomalia" or something like that.

I am a private pilot student and have had no difficulty reading lights on the PAPI/VASI, etc.

Thanks in advance!
Mike Mc
 

aloft

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I am a private pilot student and have had no difficulty reading lights on the PAPI/VASI, etc.

[/ QUOTE ]

How are you on the light gun signals? Gotta tell red and green apart there.
 

av8rmsu

Well-Known Member
A friend of mine is colorblind. He got a waiver from the FAA after seeing a specialist. I don't know what it entailed, but he has a 1st class medical and is an instructor.
 

cime_sp

Well-Known Member
If you look in the aeromedical/flight physical section and read the posts on colorblindness and the FALANT test there is a lot of info there. I actually have the same red-green deficiency but I was able to get a 1st class madical without too much problem. As long as you can pass the first class test you should be fine
 

montanapilot

Well-Known Member
if i m not mistaken the color requirements are the same whatever class of medical you get.

if you take an alternate test and send it to the FAA they will grant you a letter of evidence which you present to the AME each time you go in for a medical exempting you from the test.

just dont pay a consulting group like leftseat.com or anything to "help" you they just want your money. call your FSDO they know where these alternate tests are located at.
 

Ecl!pse

Well-Known Member
I would think it would not be much of a problem...you'll always have your captain or FO, and if he/she is incapacitated, i think you could judge how high, and use your knowlegde of the terrain and runway altitude. i would think people would be happier if you were able to get the plane safely on the ground.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I would think it would not be much of a problem...you'll always have your captain or FO, and if he/she is incapacitated, i think you could judge how high, and use your knowlegde of the terrain and runway altitude. i would think people would be happier if you were able to get the plane safely on the ground.

[/ QUOTE ]

That type of rationale will NOT work when it comes to medical problems VS. airline flying. If that indeed is the mentality, then why not let a pilot who has had a heart attack back in the cockpit???? Hey, after all, there is the NFP (non-flying pilot) who can always take over...

No, that'll NEVER work.

Bottom line is that you have to hold a first class med. for a captain, and a second class med. for a F/O. As far as the color blindness related requirements, go here:

www.faaphysical.com and check out the medical requirements.
 
Top