just got my CSEL and CFI add ons, what steps to a CSES?

flyboywbl

3rd regional in 1 year
Hey guys i just got my CSEL and CFI add ons done. So now i have CMEL, CSEL, MEI, and CFI. I'm starting work on my CFII at this time now. Also i will start teaching at the flight school shortly. Next summer i really want to get a float plane rating. I have a couple of questions.

1)What do i do to get a sea plane rating at a commercial and CFI level? do i have to do all the steps (ie take a SES private, then a CSES, then a CFI)?

2)Is it even worth it to get a sea rating? Does it look good on an application? I know this is a loaded question because it depends on what you want to do with it. I was just wondering what people thought. Do the airlines care about glider, rotorcraft, airship, or sea ratings?

I live near BZN and was wondering if any one knew of people who do sea rating training.

The other thing i thought about doing next summer would be a tail wheel endorsement. I would love to teach in a tail wheel but i think you need over 100 hours to teach in one for the insurance.

Last thing i thought about was multi time. i have 75 hours of multi time in a
DA-42 Twinstar. I was thinking about getting that magic 100 hours of multi in either the twin-star or in a conventional twin over next summer. With the recent Theilert debacle i don't think i'll be training too much in the Twinstar. Our 42 is close to 300 hour and they are not going to replace the gear boxes. they are just gonna wait for the Lycoming's. This would probably be the most expensive option but probably the most beneficial.


any way i guess i was just wondering if there is any other rating I should get to help me out in the long run besides the CFII and ATP. I've heard that it's a great idea to get as many ratings as possible and i've also heard that some of them really don't help you out, job wise, all that much.

thanks
-Matt
 

Fly_Unity

Well-Known Member
Come over to COD, I can give you your Tail-wheel, possibly your High Altitude, and High Performance. Im what, an hour or so from where you live?

For your seaplane rating, you dont need to get your private rating, just get a Commercial add-on, and CFI-S addon, and you should be good. I dont know of anyone around here that gives a sea rating.
 

flyboywbl

3rd regional in 1 year
I think Walton can do it but he does not have a plane or water for that matter. I'll keep that in mind. What plane do you use for the CSES and CFIS? What do you use for the high altitude and tail wheel. What do you charge?
 

Fly_Unity

Well-Known Member
Super Cub for 75 an hour plus instructor rate. Insurance wont allow you to solo in it until you get some hours, but I can give you the endorsement in usually 10-15 or so hours.

btw, is the wind blowing up there? Up the Southfork Canyon where I live its blowing at my estimated guess of around 70 knots. Blew one house over. I flew the cub in it today and really got beat up. Got into one downdraft that was pulling us down into the caynon at 500 fpm at full power for 2 min. Got alot of "backwards" time in though. :)
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
Take the commercial seaplane checkride. Once you do that, you will be a seaplane instructor as well as a commercial seaplane pilot.
:yeahthat:

The ASES rating is not a big deal; you can add it on at the private level or the commercial level; exact same weekend course. I took mine at Jack Brown's Seaplane Base in Winter Haven, FL. I didn't take it because I thought it would look good on airline applications; I took it because I thought it would be fun. And fun it was; some of the most fun flying I've ever done, a blast! Door and window wide open in a Piper J3 Cub. I showed up Saturday morning clueless about seaplanes. About 1/2 the first ride was basic airwork, and then the rest of the course was just bouncing around from lake to lake at 500ft AGL. Two rides total on saturday, a recommend ride on Sunday morning, and checkride Sunday afternoon. Total cost was about $800 in 1999; probably a bit more now. I took my tailwheel endorsement in a J3 landplane while I was over there too in 3-4 rides.

Notice your CFI ticket doesn't say "airplane single engine land", it just says "airplane single engine"; so you're covered as a seaplane instructor as long as you have the ASES rating on your CPL.

Next I want to do a glider rating, just for fun.
 

flyboywbl

3rd regional in 1 year
I agree it would be fun! Thats the main reason for doing it as well as all the flying i'm doing. The fact that i will someday (hopefully) be doing it for a living makes it that much more fun. Though i think getting your seaplane rating would be more fun than working but thats another post. I was thinking about doing it at WhipAir in St. Paul. My parents live there so i could stay with them for a week while i do it. WhipAir has Turbine (either Pawnees or Agwagons) crop dusters on floats as well as caravans. Not sure what they charg but that would be fun to try. Any GA planes you can get your MES rating in? I've never seen one. all the multi engine sea planes i've ever seen are big and old with radial engines on them. Any way ever since i went fly fishing up in Alaska i've fell in love with seaplanes and have always wanted to try it. Up there it is a way of life.

-Matt
 

NickH

Uber Driver
There are two reasonable MES airplanes used for training. The Grumman Widgeon is probably the most fun. It's like a big old flying boat but smaller. Most still running have Continental engines, some have more powerful Lycomings. The other trainer is less common (although I think Browns has one) and is the 'Twin Bee' a modification of the Republic Seabee. Only about 20 were made. I expect most have some kind of lycoming conversion.

Expect $500 per hour.

If you really want to fly an old MES I know a couple of people flying the grumman goose who can do training. One is East coast and one West.
 

flyboywbl

3rd regional in 1 year
Hmm at 500 bucks an hour i think i can put my money to better use since i won't be owning or renting a MES plane. If it does not look good on a resume and i will never use it what is the point? Bragging rights about a "Multi Engine SEA rating on your ticket? Although it would be cool to have i just don't think it's worth the coin. My question though is, if you have your single engine sea rating (so you know how to operate on water) and you have a multi engine rating (you know about Vmc, engine out procedures, ect) what is involved in a MES ticket that does not involve the SES or the MEL? Or is it the simple fact that it is both skill sets together that make it it's own rating. Are there any special maneuvers that you do for a MES that you don't for a SES or a MEL? One thing i can think of is taxi using the two engines to steer. I dunno any one? Enlighten me.

-Matt
 
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