Gulfstream vs King Air

GX

Well-Known Member
If either one of them were mine, there would be blood. Careless $9.50 an hour employee and 60 million dollars worth of aircraft. Bad combo on this day. A reason why many guys don't let line service touch the airplane on the ground.

"Gulfstream broke away from the tug..." :aghast:
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
You guys are so quick to judge....

How do you know a rogue wind or fast moving tsunami didn't do that? Could happen......

:D
 

GX

Well-Known Member
Just imagine that phone call.... They had just flown in from MEM this morning, where it appears the plane is based.

"Hello, Mr. Schmuckatelli, um, your plane was involved in an incident at the airport."
"Oh? What kind of incident?"
"Well, sir, we'd prefer if you just came down to the airport to understand...."
"I flew in for meetings and am tied up all day in those, is it urgent?"
"Sir, there was a Gulfstream 550 involved, and your plane is on top of the Gulfstream."
"Shall I bring my shotgun, too?"
 

TFaudree_ERAU

Mashin' dem buttons
What would YOU do if you got that phone call?
Call the insurance company and let them handle it.

Seriously. Accidents happen. FBOs have insurance, aircraft carry insurance. So you might be inconvenienced, but no one got hurt, and it may very well have been a mechanical malfunction. It's not my job as chief pilot to determine who or what was at fault.
 

TFaudree_ERAU

Mashin' dem buttons
Commercial home, and call it a day?
I'd stay on scene as long as necessary to make sure things are progressing toward getting my boss' plane back in the air. I'm a minimalist. Do the paperwork, make the phone calls, and then get the hell out of the way and let people (claims adjusters, mechanics, etc) do their job.

Trust me. Going off the deep end, getting irate and/or acting a fool gets you NOWHERE in a situation like this
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Is it known if it was being pushed or pulled? Im assuming pushed, but that's not stated anywhere specifically that Ive seen.

Only because I try to get all the facts before getting angry and/or judging the situation.
 

ghogue

Well-Known Member
A number of years ago, we had one of our Lear 35's RON in Nashville. The FBO moved it to a location that had a bit of slope, but forgot to chock it. It ended up beneath a Gulfstream (IIRC) with its roof peeled back. Took many months to get it back into the air.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
OR

When you pay a guy $9.50 and hour you get what you pay for.
I scratch my head about that every day. Most line crew (guys and gals) either want to be pilots or can't be pilots. They all love aviation and wouldn't be there if they didn't. Most of them are very sharp too and I usually feel lucky to be working in a field where someone smarter than me is servicing my lav.

Of course the same reason why line crew are mistreated is the same reason pilots are mistreated.

Granted there are some real dummies on out there too. I always observe fueling and other line actions.
 

N519AT

Ahh! This is how I change this!
I'd stay on scene as long as necessary to make sure things are progressing toward getting my boss' plane back in the air. I'm a minimalist. Do the paperwork, make the phone calls, and then get the hell out of the way and let people (claims adjusters, mechanics, etc) do their job.

Trust me. Going off the deep end, getting irate and/or acting a fool gets you NOWHERE in a situation like this
I can't do it on my phone, but like.


This post brought to you by beta from my iPhone.
 
Top