Comair and ASA....121 or 135?

MattB

New Member
Ok, I just want to get this strait: Looking at your bio it says you are a CFII, and you were asking if Comair and ASA were 121 or 135?
 

DakotaBlue

New Member
gradiated dca, and since when is knowing what regs a certain airline operates under part of the pts knowledge areas?
 

MattB

New Member
You're right, I apologize. I didn't mean for it to sound like I was coming down on you or something. I honestly just thought that it would be an area DCA would have instructed you in.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
gradiated dca, and since when is knowing what regs a certain airline operates under part of the pts knowledge areas?

[/ QUOTE ]

No PTS involved here

I think Mr. B just found it odd that someone graduating from one of the airline-factory academies wouldn't have already been immersed in the subject. That's all.
 

Fearless

Dash Dominatrix
Actually, the question isn't quite as simple as it sounds. A few years ago, some of the regional airlines were allowed to operate under Part 135 rules (for aircraft less than 30 seats, if I recall correctly). In a major regulatory change, the FAA later required these carriers to conform to Part 121 regulations. However, there are some airlines that still have an exemption to operate their smaller equipment under Part 135 duty time rules.

I don't know if either ASA or Comair ever operated under Part 135. They are currently Part 121 operations.

FFFI
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]

Actually, the question isn't quite as simple as it sounds. A few years ago, some of the regional airlines were allowed to operate under Part 135 rules (for aircraft less than 30 seats, if I recall correctly). In a major regulatory change, the FAA later required these carriers to conform to Part 121 regulations. However, there are some airlines that still have an exemption to operate their smaller equipment under Part 135 duty time rules.

I don't know if either ASA or Comair ever operated under Part 135. They are currently Part 121 operations.

FFFI

[/ QUOTE ]

Most, if not all, of the regionals were 135 prior to the FAA change; I believe Horizon being one of the first 121 converts.
 

Ophir

Well-Known Member
Looking at the applicability section of 135, it basically goes back to a Rule from 1996. Non-transport turboprop 10-19 seats, Transport turboprop 20-30 seats, Turbojets 1-30 seats could be grandfathered into 135.

As far as I know, it is usually beneficial for the 135 scheduled aircarrier to go 121 for a multitude of reasons. I don't know all of them but I believe it has to do mostly with your relationship with the FAA/local FSDO and how you are set up to opperate.

Like MikeD said most regionals used to be 135. Just after deregulation in 78', almost all regionals were 135, but that was when they were considered air-taxis and local service airlines. With dereg, the regionals began code-sharing and the growth within the regionals was explosive. They quickly became feeder routes to the major and nationals. So the trend to incorporate them into 121 rules was almost inevitable. Additionally, I believe the a relationship between a 121 and a 135 is not as clear and therefore the push was to make all the regionals 121.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I mean, you would think a guy that went to "the only flight academy that services the Delta Connection Carriers" wouldn't have to ask what FAR's the "Delta Connection Carriers" operate under....
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
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I mean, you would think a guy that went to "the only flight academy that services the Delta Connection Carriers" wouldn't have to ask what FAR's the "Delta Connection Carriers" operate under....

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I figured the airline's own training course would cover that too.....
 

DakotaBlue

New Member
well they dont...its not really focused at the airline as much as you would think....yea they train like your at the airline (i.e. CRM and flows) but we didnt go into 121 vs. 135 regs
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
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its not really focused at the airline

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That is really funny when considering their advertising.
 

DakotaBlue

New Member
you guys can really twist a comment to make it work for you cant ya? while you may not agree, i think that i recieved good training at DCA, yea their advertising campaign sucks and is misleading, but it does prepare you for the airline when your all said and done
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
you guys can really twist a comment to make it work for you cant ya? while you may not agree, i think that i recieved good training at DCA, yea their advertising campaign sucks and is misleading, but it does prepare you for the airline when your all said and done

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Comair Academy aka DCA just makes that to easy. You don't really even have to twist it.

I am not bashing their training, I am sure you and everyone else receives good training. But what I don't agree with is their advertising. I am sure many lives have been shattered and dreams broken because of how much they charge to get to the right seat, then get paid squat. And how many people don't make it there? I'll tell you, a lot, so all they are left with is a huge debt some ratings.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
you guys can really twist a comment to make it work for you cant ya? while you may not agree, i think that i recieved good training at DCA, yea their advertising campaign sucks and is misleading, but it does prepare you for the airline when your all said and done

[/ QUOTE ]
Really? How do you know that personally?
 

montanapilot

Well-Known Member
I don't know anything about their training good or bad. But their advertising is downright scandalous. And whats the deal with the guy in the ad that looks like he has to take a crap.

But what the heck i might as well spend 70,000 because
"Being Airline Owned Makes The Difference!"
 
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