BRS equipped Cessna 152?

jspeed87

Well-Known Member
I’ll be in a position to hopefully become an aircraft owner in the next 2 years or so, and was thinking of a Cessna 152 with a BRS? I know they have the system for a 172/182, but a 152 can be had for less than 40k, which is my budget for cash only purchase. The reason for the BRS is, I enjoy flying at night, and the added safety feature is a plus for me. My mission profile is KSBY to KLDJ to visit family every other weekend. It’s 150 NM, about 1 hour 20 minute flight, driving one way alone is 3 hours and 30 minutes best case scenario with no traffic. It will be mostly pleasure flying on the east coast. I will be flying solo, with the occasional friend family memeber, but only locally or short cross country. I kind of feel like the 152 is limited, but it could fit my mission profile. They go for about 30k on trade a plane, and with the BRS install, should put me right on budget. The other option is to delay the purchase another year or so, and go for the 172. Thoughts?
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
I’ll be in a position to hopefully become an aircraft owner in the next 2 years or so, and was thinking of a Cessna 152 with a BRS? I know they have the system for a 172/182, but a 152 can be had for less than 40k, which is my budget for cash only purchase. The reason for the BRS is, I enjoy flying at night, and the added safety feature is a plus for me. My mission profile is KSBY to KLDJ to visit family every other weekend. It’s 150 NM, about 1 hour 20 minute flight, driving one way alone is 3 hours and 30 minutes best case scenario with no traffic. It will be mostly pleasure flying on the east coast. I will be flying solo, with the occasional friend family memeber, but only locally or short cross country. I kind of feel like the 152 is limited, but it could fit my mission profile. They go for about 30k on trade a plane, and with the BRS install, should put me right on budget. The other option is to delay the purchase another year or so, and go for the 172. Thoughts?
The cost of the BRS is 1/3 the cost of the airplane?

Do you get any insurance benefit out of it? Are there any 152s for sale with the BRS already done? What does that do to your already-limited useful load?
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
How slow can you get that sucker with the barn doors out? (40 degrees of flaps) I think I'd rather touch under control at 30 something knots than under canopy and out of control. That's just me though.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
How slow can you get that sucker with the barn doors out? (40 degrees of flaps) I think I'd rather touch under control at 30 something knots than under canopy and out of control. That's just me though.
That was sort of my thinking. Plus, even at night, if you can make a forced landing (which, in the areas he's talking about is quite possible on a LOT of that terrain) you may be able to recover the airplane. BRS landing, the plane is likely totaled. At least that's my understanding from reading about Cirri.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
That was sort of my thinking. Plus, even at night, if you can make a forced landing (which, in the areas he's talking about is quite possible on a LOT of that terrain) you may be able to recover the airplane. BRS landing, the plane is likely totaled. At least that's my understanding from reading about Cirri.
That wouldn't necessarily be the case for an aluminum airplane, though the major factor is always how much you want to spend. The reason the Cirrus isn't economically repairable is that the chute straps are embedded in the fuselage skin, so deployment itself causes a lot of damage. Worth it if you survive the landing!

I believe in a 150 the chute fires out of the rear cabin window, so if the landing itself doesn't really damage something it wouldn't be too tough to repair.




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jspeed87

Well-Known Member
That wouldn't necessarily be the case for an aluminum airplane, though the major factor is always how much you want to spend. The reason the Cirrus isn't economically repairable is that the chute straps are embedded in the fuselage skin, so deployment itself causes a lot of damage. Worth it if you survive the landing!

I believe in a 150 the chute fires out of the rear cabin window, so if the landing itself doesn't really damage something it wouldn't be too tough to repair.




Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
So dose BRS make chutes for the 152/150?
 

jspeed87

Well-Known Member
The cost of the BRS is 1/3 the cost of the airplane?

Do you get any insurance benefit out of it? Are there any 152s for sale with the BRS already done? What does that do to your already-limited useful load?
Probably might get some insurance benefit. I haven't seen any 152's but have seen 172's. I believe it only adds like 70 pounds in the rear baggage compartment. It could also increase the value of the 152 if I wanted to sell it later.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
I’ll be in a position to hopefully become an aircraft owner in the next 2 years or so, and was thinking of a Cessna 152 with a BRS? I know they have the system for a 172/182, but a 152 can be had for less than 40k, which is my budget for cash only purchase. The reason for the BRS is, I enjoy flying at night, and the added safety feature is a plus for me. My mission profile is KSBY to KLDJ to visit family every other weekend. It’s 150 NM, about 1 hour 20 minute flight, driving one way alone is 3 hours and 30 minutes best case scenario with no traffic. It will be mostly pleasure flying on the east coast. I will be flying solo, with the occasional friend family memeber, but only locally or short cross country. I kind of feel like the 152 is limited, but it could fit my mission profile. They go for about 30k on trade a plane, and with the BRS install, should put me right on budget. The other option is to delay the purchase another year or so, and go for the 172. Thoughts?
You should be able to pick up a nice 172 for under 40k as well.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
Hmm, didn’t even know what a BRS was. After finding out, I’m proud to have not known.
It's got quite a few successful saves on it's record, they claim 383 lives saved. Not all of them are stupid pilot tricks.

One guy had a seizure during an instrument approach and was out for a period of time, came to over Vne and in an "unusual attitude," and decided to pull not knowing if whatever it was would happen again.

I really don't understand the hate. It's just another option in a bad situation.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
It's got quite a few successful saves on it's record, they claim 383 lives saved. Not all of them are stupid pilot tricks.

One guy had a seizure during an instrument approach and was out for a period of time, came to over Vne and in an "unusual attitude," and decided to pull not knowing if whatever it was would happen again.

I really don't understand the hate. It's just another option in a bad situation.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
It’s generally a crutch for weekend warriors who have no business flying.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
It’s generally a crutch for weekend warriors who have no business flying.
I get why you say this, and it can be true in some cases and not true in others - it would depend entirely on the circumstances at the time of deployment. BRS has saved pilots from some questionable decisions, it has also saved some lives where the pilot did stuff "right."

We've argued about Cirrus and the 'chute on this site ad nauseam for the last dozen years or so (it seems to surface every once in a while) and while we (the collective we) can debate the merits of one's flying skills all over the place, the fact is that BRS has saved a lot of lives.

You've been a safety-conscious guy as long as I've known you (here), and you tend to fly very conservatively from what you've described, so if a 'chute would give you a life-saving advantage, I'm surprised at the response.
 

SlumTodd_Millionaire

Evil Landlord Capitalist
I get why you say this, and it can be true in some cases and not true in others - it would depend entirely on the circumstances at the time of deployment. BRS has saved pilots from some questionable decisions, it has also saved some lives where the pilot did stuff "right."

We've argued about Cirrus and the 'chute on this site ad nauseam for the last dozen years or so (it seems to surface every once in a while) and while we (the collective we) can debate the merits of one's flying skills all over the place, the fact is that BRS has saved a lot of lives.

You've been a safety-conscious guy as long as I've known you (here), and you tend to fly very conservatively from what you've described, so if a 'chute would give you a life-saving advantage, I'm surprised at the response.
I'm generally not a fan of crutches. It's the same reason I criticize people who immediately revert to hand flying because they don't understand the automation. The key to real safety is knowing what the hell you're doing, not relying upon crutches.
 

milleR

Well-Known Member
I'm generally not a fan of crutches. It's the same reason I criticize people who immediately revert to hand flying because they don't understand the automation. The key to real safety is knowing what the hell you're doing, not relying upon crutches.
I mean, I hear you but it's a single engine piston. Single. Engine. Piston.

I'll take a 'chute if it's an option :p
 
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