Auxiliary Studies

Raydon

New Member
Just a curious question for everyone.

I have limited experience in aviation.. 20 hours in a piper, a few more in cessnas and i worked as a fueler @ KCCR in the bay area for a while.. but other than that I never really studied the subject. I know how to fly and talk on the radios.. but FL's, Airpsace types and everything that's basic knowledge for an ATC.. well I don't know.

Are any of you going out and buying books and studying up on your own or are you like me.. just interested and getting in line?
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
Is FAA Order 7110.65 too complex to grasp, because all of the information you need to know is in there. Depending on if you are TERMINAL/ENROUTE, I can point you in the right direction as what areas you can start studying up on, stuff that you have to know...also the Pilot/Controller Glossary is a great source of information too.

Let me know!
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
I apologize if you think my post came across as smart; however, I'm trying to supply you with the best information to help you prepare for life as an air traffic controller....

I asked if the book was too complex because even for seasoned controllers it can be intimidating, but I would be happy to point you to areas that could help you out with all of that stuff.

Do you know what facility are you going to be assigned? One of the best pieces of advice to give you once you do know, is contact that facilities training department and plead with them to get a copy of their training manual. You can study up on that to get ahead of the game. My training department gave me the manual about two months before I checked it and it helped tremendously.

Again, I apologize if you think I came over rude...I'm just trying to help you out.

If there is something specific you are looking for, let me know and I'll see what I can do to find it for you.
 

Ammolite

New Member
I don't mean to bud in, but I have little aviation knowledge (and zip for experience), and I learned quite a bit from just casually perusing the 7110.65, as the previous response suggested. There are tons of acronyms, and protocol with which to familiarize yourself.

I remember a previous thread where ATLTracon gave a list of materials one could study, to prepare for your facility, but it might've been more focused on those going to centers.
 

Raydon

New Member
oh.. well... haha.. sorry i took that as an insult to my intelligence for a second. i'll definitely look up the materials.. can't be any more difficult than a cryptology//cryptography text book right?
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
That tower is LAS

Again...I for sure wasn't insulting your intelligence...I barely grasp half the stuff the 7110.65...(or what most controllers refer to it as the "Point 65) says and I've been reading out of it for 10 years.

However, it is the best source of information to start learning as an ATCer because it is the Handbook that tells us how to do our job. We have to go by every rule in this book.

Here's a link to it:

FAA Order 7110.65 (Though I think revision "T" is the most current)...
 

HonuPineapple

New Member
I'm working toward a private pilot license to see if that helps any.

All other "experience" comes from growing up with a dad who's a professional pilot (he's done it all, military, airline, corporate) and all his pilot buddies.
 

Raydon

New Member
That tower is LAS

Again...I for sure wasn't insulting your intelligence...I barely grasp half the stuff the 7110.65...(or what most controllers refer to it as the "Point 65) says and I've been reading out of it for 10 years.

However, it is the best source of information to start learning as an ATCer because it is the Handbook that tells us how to do our job. We have to go by every rule in this book.

Here's a link to it:

FAA Order 7110.65 (Though I think revision "T" is the most current)...
yeah it's ok.. my ego decided to take a break and let my better half get control of the thread after i read through it a couple of times.

That pdf is quite a gem. My last job was as a supervisor for DirecTV's call center in Missoula.. so I'm familiar with exorbant documentation and rigid policy adherence.

You can bet your butt i'll be studying it.

Do you guys think watching "Waldo Pepper" and "Those magnificent men in their flying machines" helps too? I have them running almost 24\7 right now.
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
I watch Spongebob and Go Gabba Gabba....I really think it helps my cognitive skills....haha

By the way, if you know what facility you are to be assigned, I can help break down which areas of the .65 you really need to know and which areas you can throw out the window....It would behoove you to at least study chapter 2 real thoroughly for now!
 

Raydon

New Member
I WOULD like KCCR tower. Don't know what level it is but it's a municipal. No regional/airline traffic, just corporate charter and private. The largest craft they ever land there is the G5 and that's a stretch. (STOL)

From what I'm reading though it sounds like it may be best to shoot for en-route first and make a more gentle transition.. but I grew up on that airport and.. well the heaviest stack I ever saw there was 2 pipers, a cub, learjet and a cessna 150.

it keeps a steady pace when busy but i've never seen anything that could be considered close to chaos... except for that one time this Trinidad pilot forgot he wasn't flying a tail-dragger and tried to whip the tail around and broke a wing off.
 

Raydon

New Member
I WOULD like KCCR tower. Don't know what level it is but it's a small municipal. No regional/airline traffic, just corporate charter and private. The largest craft they ever land there is the G5 and that's a stretch. (STOL)

From what I'm reading though it sounds like it may be best to shoot for en-route first and make a more gentle transition.. but I grew up on that airport and.. well the heaviest stack I ever saw there was 2 cherokees, a cub, learjet and a cessna 150.

it keeps a steady pace when busy but i've never seen anything that could be considered close to chaos... except for that one time this Trinidad pilot forgot he wasn't flying a tail-dragger and tried to whip the tail around and broke a wing off @ the end of the runway
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
CCR is a level 6 with it looks like a very high locality percentage...over 27%...so even though it is a small facility you will get paid halfway decent on the new payrules...

is CCR and up/down? are they tower/approach combined?
 

Raydon

New Member
the only thing I can say to that is that you only talk to one person from 10 miles out until they tell you to switch to ground.
 

Raydon

New Member
Flight Following and all that other jazz comes from Travis if you're heading North, and ZLA if you're heading South over Oakland/SF
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
Sounds good...that means they are a VFR tower only. They have Class Delta airspace...just off the top of my head...delta generally from the surface up to 2500 AGL' charted in MSL and usually extends 5 miles from the center of the airport.

A class delta tower is the simplest there is and would be a nice start to your ATC career. There aren't as many rules as say...a Class "B"...which I work at...a big headache!
 

Raydon

New Member
I agree. Plus I could jump down from the tower into a plane with my old instructor on my lunch breaks and high tail it to Napa for a sammich.

(which by the way is my #2 pick.. (KAPC))

which I would assume is similar to your bravo.. maybe it's a charlie.. but they do receive regional and small airline flights.
 

LawnGnome

Well-Known Member
not sure off the top of my head...by probably a delta or charlie...bravo's only surround the nations busiest airport and are one of the most restrictive airspaces there is.

A good bet for an OTS hire I would think would be Center because the training program is so structured....towers are completely different story....and TRACONS...well....they are just tough as nails...specially the consolidated ones.
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
Is FAA Order 7110.65 too complex to grasp, because all of the information you need to know is in there. Depending on if you are TERMINAL/ENROUTE, I can point you in the right direction as what areas you can start studying up on, stuff that you have to know...also the Pilot/Controller Glossary is a great source of information too.

Let me know!
Its probably a bit dry for someone with limited to no knowledge of the subject though. Not saying its not a good source of information, but there is probably better reading material for someone who is trying to learn. Hell, I can only take reading it for about 15 minutes at a sitting, and this is coming from someone who actually enjoys reading IR study guides.

My recommendation for someone in that boat would be to read the Kershner Instrument Rating Handbook. It covers airspace, ATC procedures, holds, etc., in a format that is actually conducive to reading. It is more of a textbook than a reference material so it won't put you to sleep after half an hour. Yes, it is more from a pilot's point of view, but the basics apply to both pilots and ATC, so its a good start. At a minimum, it will familiarize someone with the airspace system and will probably ease your understanding of the 7110.65.
 
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