Yesterday I learned...

naunga

New Member
...that a big breakfast at Bob Evans and an hour of ground reference manuvers don't make for a pleasent time.

Actually I was fine until the 4th time through the steep turns.

Thankfully even though I turned greened my Bob Evans' breakfast stayed in my stomach....I'm sure my CFI is thankful as well.

Anyhow, did make me think afterwards how I would've handled that situation if I were alone.

Basically decided that I would switch on the auto pilot and do my best to see and avoid while my head cleared. I would also make a bee line for the nearest airport.

I've heard that going to instruments only can help, but in my case yesterday it made me sick to even look at the panel, but I suppose if I had no choice I would have to.

Any thoughts?

Naunga
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I've only gotten sick once in an airplane, but I didn't 'purge' onboard

We were out practicing ground reference manuevers over Gilroy, CA.

Gilroy is the "Garlic Capital of the World" and even at 3000' AGL, in the summertime, you have a thick smell of garlic in the cabin of the aircraft.

Well, it was about 90 degrees that day and tremendously tubulent. Low and behold I had a student from a nation that does not traditionally use deoderant. So between the heavy fog of garlic odor, the heat, the oderiferous stench of my student and a good dose of turbulence, it was time to practice engine out manuevers.

I grabbed the throttle, slowly moved it to idle and told my student, "Ok, your engine is out now, but today you're pretty close to pretty close to Hollister, see if you can make it.

Anyway, we land, I declare "break time!" andd run off to the FBO for a 'break'.

My oh my!
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
In my little experience (6 hours now!) I have gotten really queasy a few times already, which has me slightly worried. I think a lot of it has to do with nerves (the first few power on stalls and spins) and a lot has to do with body temp (wearing my parka while flying with the heat up all the way.) So I was wondering, does this sort of thing go away over time as you get more comfortable in the aircraft? I can only imagen what unusual attitude recoveries are going to be like. Do some of you wear sea bands (wrist band things) when flying? Do you just "get over it"? Or is this something that I may continue to have problems with?

Ethan
 

Ralgha

Well-Known Member
It goes away after time for just about everyone. Usually doesn't take too terribly long, so just stick it out as best you can, it'll get better.
 

Mongoose

New Member
[ QUOTE ]

Gilroy is the "Garlic Capital of the World" and even at 3000' AGL, in the summertime, you have a thick smell of garlic in the cabin of the aircraft.


[/ QUOTE ]

Wow, that's some title


"Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome to Gilroy International Airport. When we arrive at the gate a customer service agent will be waiting to welcome you with a basket of breath mints"
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
naunga, using the a/p and staring at the instruments is similar to staring at the seat in front of you while car sick in the back. You want to fly and look out at the horizon
 

ananoman

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
In my little experience (6 hours now!) I have gotten really queasy a few times already, which has me slightly worried. I think a lot of it has to do with nerves (the first few power on stalls and spins)

[/ QUOTE ]

Your CFI should not have you doing spins at 6 hours of flight time. The first few hours should just be spend practicing the 4 fundamentals (straight & level, climbs, turns, descents). After that you would normally move on to slow flight, stalls, and ground reference. Spins would not usually be taught until you are almost ready for your private checkride, it they are taught at all.

It may help to not pitch up so much when doing stalls. In a power on stall a Cherokee or C172 will stall at about 12 degrees of pitch. Power off you can stall when pitched level. Just be patient. I find alot of students want to pitch up too much. Remember you are simulating a stall on climbout and a stall on landing. You would not normally pitch up so much on landing that you cannot see the runway, so why do it in a power off stall?
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
Yeah, my instructor did spins in my first .5 hours of flight. He said he wanted to make sure I knew how to get out of them from the begining. We haven't done any since then (which is fine with me!) but I do agree with his theory. Normally I'll be fine until we get to doing something that I am really not comfortable with (like landing in a snow squawl with a 15kt cross wind) and I will start to over heat and get light headed. I find that I was doing that when I was first doing 45* turns, but I don't seem to have a problem with them anymore. So guess there is hope. That and I won't be going to Bob Even's right before I fly any time soon.
 

ananoman

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Yeah, my instructor did spins in my first .5 hours of flight. He said he wanted to make sure I knew how to get out of them from the begining.

[/ QUOTE ]

That makes alot of sense, to take someone who does not really know how to control the airplane and does not really even know what a stall is, and have them do spins, just in case they get into one. I'm sure you learned alot in that first half hour.

I would have to say that if your instructor does this to his students, that he is a retard. Student pilots often do not know any better when they encounter an instructor like this. You just assume that they know what they are doing. You have respect for them because they know how to fly and you don't.

I wonder how many people came to this guy wanting to learn how to fly, and gave it up after taking their first introductory lesson/terror ride.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Gilroy is the "Garlic Capital of the World" and even at 3000' AGL, in the summertime, you have a thick smell of garlic in the cabin of the aircraft.

[/ QUOTE ]

I can't even imagine flying over the top of it, but driving through there is a truly weird experience. I did go to the Garlic Festival I'm not sure it the smell is more powerful there, or driving past Harris Ranch on I-5...
 

FLpilot

New Member
Back when I was working on my private ('98), my instructor covered spin entry/recovery in the first couple lessons (I think it was right at 4 hours).
 

sigmanu499

New Member
you think Garlic is bad! Try going into Chino, CA, it has cow farms all around, all you smell below 1,000 is cow and their droppings. Its even better on a nice hot summer day!
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
Anonoman, I'll certainly give you the fact that my instructor isn't the most out going guy in the world. But I didn't really have any other options. The next closest place I could have taken lessions was 45 min farther away. Also, while not all that forgiving, he is certainly knowledgable as he is a retired 757 driver for USAir. So I guess I'll take the experience over personality.

Ethan
 

JEP

Malko In Charge
Staff member
Dude, at least you made it down. I was on my long XC for my ppl and it was getting bumpy at 3500 so I started to climb up to 5500 and see how it was. As I was climbing i dropped my pen and reached over to the other side on the floor when I came up, my head was doing flips. I reached for the sic-sac. I found out that eggs don't dissolve very easily. I have gone on to my IFR training and I picked up a Relief-Band. I don't know how it works, but I would not fly without it now. I can do steep turns, unusual attitudes, whatever and no sickness.
 

Tim06

New Member
So is it worth picking up one of those Relief-bands? This Northeast flying can pull reverse digestion on ya!
 

Hollywood

New Member
i can't believe your instructor put you in a spin in your first half hour of flight! i would have to agree that there is a possibility that he is retarded. there is absolutley no benefit to you as a student by doing that. probably scared the [expletive deleted] out of you. i know it would've scared me if my instructor did that my first flight.
 

Flugmaschine

New Member
We had a jerk instructor out here for a while who liked to take female students out for their first flight and spin them like crazy. They never came back. I don't know if he was trying to get laid or if he had a problem with women in a cockpit. If the former, uh, you'd think he'd clue in after a while that it wasn't working?
All I know is that I could never get him to do spins with me.

Of course, there's the other end of the spectrum (and we have one here, as well woohoo!) where the guy sits in the right seat while his student taxis back and forth around the airport for an HOUR. This after an HOUR of ground (believe me when I say he's as exciting as whale poo). I always thought the best thing to do was jump in the airplane and go for a nice NORMAL flight for the first time. But I dunno, maybe I'm nuts.
 

PhilosopherPilot

Well-Known Member
Just out of curiousity, any of you guys who were doing spins, did your instructors give you parachutes, and were you in aerobatic aircraft? Or were you just in a 150/152 with no chutes?

I could be wrong, but doesn't a spin count as an aerobatic maneuver? It certainly involves maneuvers not necessary to the flight, and unusual attitudes. I guess my question is: Is it legal to do spins without aerobatic gear?

G
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
Yep. I don't have my FAR's, but you don't have to wear chuites while performing spins in an aircraft.

Edit

91.307 (d) (2) Which says that parachutes aren't required when performing spins with a CFI to meet requirements of a rating or certificate.
 
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