Tab Express

primetime

New Member
Tab Express just sent 2 pilots to American Eagle with barely 500 hours, any other programs able to compete with that????
 

Cosmo1999

Well-Known Member
Woop De doo. your not actually thinking of blowing all that cash just so you can say you got hired like a few months ahead of a CFI are you? I bet if you would pay just to get time in a Beech 1900 and wear a cool hat then you would probably also do this dance if they asked you do on command just to get an extra hour
 

Aviator737

New Member
Yes, there are programs that beat that, without being icky pay-for-training.

Take the San Juan College/Mesa Pilot Development program in New Mexico. Barring being washed out and poor attitude/performance, you could fly for Mesa at 300 hours.

I believe FlightSafety is starting back up their direct-track ASA and Eagle programs. Not sure if those are PFT, however.

Or you could go overseas and fly 747s for JAL at about 300 hours.
 

wheelsup

Well-Known Member
Regional Airline Academy right next door in Deland placed more students at Colgan than Tab did during the last round of hirings...AND they had fewer hours (around 400-450).
.

~wheelsup
 

jonnyb

Well-Known Member
Absolutely unbelievable. 400 hour pilots flying around in RJ's.
That's enough to keep me off 'em. But then, what do I know.
 

derg

Deplatformer
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Regional Airline Academy right next door in Deland placed more students at Colgan than Tab did during the last round of hirings...AND they had fewer hours (around 400-450).
.

~wheelsup

[/ QUOTE ]

Note to self, before I purchase a ticket on USAirways, make sure there are no segments on Colgan...
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
This has been re-hashed time and time again, but I still haven't gotten an answer that satisfies me yet. Everyone is always up in arms about a "300 hour pilot flying an RJ." I know CFIs with over 1000 hours have more experience dealing with weather, atc, and CRM factors. However, how are they better prepared to handle an a/c at those speeds? Another thing that gets me is that everyone acts as if BOTH pilots are 300 hour pilots. I know that a captain shouldn't be a teacher, but he does at least have SOME control over what goes on. If the pilot is a product of a well designed, focused program, and the result is he passes the same ground school and checkride as his 1000 hour CFI counterpart, what's the big deal? The US military has focused programs that have pilots defending the country in roughly 300 hours, yet you don't hear people complaining about that.
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
Ok let me try this one.

I've flown with 300 hr FOs and I've flown with 12,000 hr captains. I've hit pretty much everything in between.

As far as technical flying skills, I saw good and bad pilots at both levels. The difference is that the 300hr pilots were willing to listen to "the old hack" and take some advice. For the most part the high time "bad" pilots were not interested in my opinion. They had learned bad habits and wanted to keep them!

Here's an example. In transport category aircraft, you frequently try to stay at altitude as long as possible, for many reasons, such as smooth air, fuel consumption, visibility, etc.

As a result, there is a maneuver which I call the "chop and drop." All of you have been in airliners before and probably experienced the sudden, weightless inducing maneuver that many pilots use to leave altitude.

In a 737 with autothrottles, for example, the easiest way to do this is to hit VS and flip the selector right to 2000fpm down.

I am not in favor of this maneuver in any aircraft. It practically puts the passengers on the ceiling. It certainly brings it to their attention that they are flying. My goal is a smooth flight that never brings it to the attention of the passengers that any maneuvers are being executed.

It is much more comfortable to slowly bring the throttles (power levers, thrust levers, insert PC title here) back to idle and let the nose drop gradually.

In the 737 I would dial in 200fpm first, then 300, then 500, then 700 etc. The throttles would inch back and I would be at a 2000fpm descent in about 15 seconds as opposed to instantly.

Much more comfortable and much less noticable.

Low time pilots were willing to listen. The high timers who "chopped and dropped" just plain didn't care.



OK now this is all about technical skills. As far as judgement, experience with weather, and "flying savvy" then it's a completely different story. I would rather fly with the 12,000 hr guy any day. They may bounce me around but they have a history of making it home safely and in one piece.

They were also 100% better on the radio.

Sorry about the long post.
 

jonnyb

Well-Known Member
You're right Kellwolf, a 1000 hour CFI isn't much more comforting.
The fact is, everyone has to start somewhere. It just shouldn't be in an RJ. Beech 1900 is more like it.
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
[ QUOTE ]
It just shouldn't be in an RJ. Beech 1900 is more like it.

[/ QUOTE ]

Beech, RJ, Dash....I'll take anything. I'm not choosy.
 

Tim

New Member
I had a friend who fly EMB-120's that if you want to work while flying then fly the Brasilia if not fly the RJ. He said in the 120 something is always have to be monitered or moving and in the RJ is all right there in front of you for the computer to watch
 

Bog

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I know that a captain shouldn't be a teacher, but he does at least have SOME control over what goes on.

[/ QUOTE ]

Try sitting across from a "300 hour wonder" when it's night, it's stormy, and homebrew is still doing the after takeoff checklists an hour later. No-one should feel like they're single pilot in an RJ, especially with 88 people behind you. Not a fun feeling.
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
[ QUOTE ]
Try sitting across from a "300 hour wonder" when it's night, it's stormy, and homebrew is still doing the after takeoff checklists an hour later. No-one should feel like they're single pilot in an RJ, especially with 88 people behind you. Not a fun feeling.

[/ QUOTE ]

Sounds to me like said FO should be sent to his room at the hotel to chair fly......
 

Bog

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Sounds to me like said FO should be sent to his room at the hotel to chair fly......

[/ QUOTE ]

Chair flying won't help when the radar is painting red everywhere and the lightning is burning your retinas. Besides, goodness knows that I was never a newbie, inexperienced pilot. I was born into greatness.

Stop laughing!!! My therapist said I need to work on my self-esteem issues ... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/spin2.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/spin2.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/spin2.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/spin2.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/spin2.gif
 
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