NAV TIPS

jetman

New Member
HI guys im looking for some general guide lines or procedures on how to choose a good set -heading point out of unfamiliar airports[controlled,uncontrolled.single,multirunway etc] when planing a VFR trip.
Tnx for help
 

jetman

New Member
Sorry about it

When drawing the track lines on the chart[VFR] the point where the line starts [set-heading point]] is an easily identifiable landmark close to the dep airport that can be 'eye ball' by the pilot and use to set heading,alt,power,reset giro,time etc
 

jetman

New Member
Sorry about it

When drawing the track lines on the chart[VFR] the point where the line starts [set-heading point or check pt #1] is an easily identifiable landmark close to the dep airport that can be 'eye ball' by the pilot and use to set heading,alt,power,reset giro,time etc
 

hammer

New Member
Sorry, jetman ... I think you've lost us all. The way you've worded your question, it makes no sense at all.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
I think he's looking for pointers on picking a good "first" check point(?). Something close enough to the airport to find visually and get an initial heading...
 

Maximilian_Jenius

Super User
Well if that's the case just look for popular and easy visual reference points to be seen from the air.

Also you don't want to have them spaced out too far from one another as well.


Matthew
 

stalled

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Well if that's the case just look for popular and easy visual reference points to be seen from the air.

Also you don't want to have them spaced out too far from one another as well.


Matthew

[/ QUOTE ]

good answer, just to add on, pick anything you can see from the air and aligned with your route, 15 to 25 miles is good distance to make sure your still on course, (and dont use rr tracks they're pretty hard to see a few thousand feet up) when you draw your line draw it from the airport, when you reach 500 agl turn on course and it will work out just fine.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
Lot's of little tricks to learn, too. They can depend on where you are, though. For example, here in the cold, cold, North, lakes are a great landmark in the summer, and just horrible in the winter. When they're frozen and covered with snow they look just like the farm fields all around.

I'm sure others have plenty of other examples....
 

drummerboy

Well-Known Member
I know exactly what you are talking about. A set heading point is something that we use for VFR navigation, but most commercial pilots have never heard of them or forget what they were. I'm in commercial training right now and have been told once you're done the flight test its something you will rarely use. Basically the idea is a point that is easy to identify and navigate to visually, so that when you're at the point you are at altitude. One of the reasons I've been told this is good is when you determine your headings the winds can be different at different altitudes as you climb and I've seen it happen even in my 172
. Once you reach the point you turn to your precalculated heading, take your time, talk, ect. I'd say the best idea is chosing something that is really going to stand out, usually about 10 miles from the airport. Personally I found that it was a good way to be introduced into navigation, but that it can be difficult sometimes. Usually a town, major intersection, or lake work the best. Just be careful about things like season, some lakes are hard to see when frozen over, or at night its has to be something thats lit. Hope this helps happy navigating
 

Grumpy01

New Member
I would add, that the first 3 or 4 points should be no more thah 5 miles apart.After that you can space them out to 10 or so miles.

The first pionts are not used for time, as much as to insure you are starting out on course. It is easier to adjust for drift with closer points.

The BIGGEST problem is the initial heading after takeoff.

If you miss the first point and it is 15 miles from the departure point, YOU ARE LOST.

That is why the first points "3 or 4" should be retelivly close together. Time is not critical at this juncture. After you get to altitude then you can get the time stuff figured out.

BUT GET ON COURSE TO BEGIN WITH.

Just my opinion.
 

stalled

New Member
well five miles is a little too close if you did your planning correctly you shouldn't have a problem, if they wer only five miles apart you would reach a checkpoint every minute ...overkill
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
well five miles is a little too close if you did your planning correctly you shouldn't have a problem, if they wer only five miles apart you would reach a checkpoint every minute ...overkill

[/ QUOTE ]
five miles per minute = 300 miles per hour....
 

Grumpy01

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
well five miles is a little too close if you did your planning correctly you shouldn't have a problem, if they wer only five miles apart you would reach a checkpoint every minute ...overkill

[/ QUOTE ]

I'm just saying 5 mi for the first 4 or 5 to allow you to get on course and correct for deviation at the start. Not fly for 15 miles and find you are 5 miles off course and lost.

I can't count the number of times I have been sitting at an airport when a student landed asking where they were. And, it all stems from not getting on course immidiatly after TO.
 

hammer

New Member
[ QUOTE ]

I can't count the number of times I have been sitting at an airport when a student landed asking where they were. And, it all stems from not getting on course immidiatly after TO.

[/ QUOTE ]

You've got to be kidding. I don't know many guys that have had that happen to them once let alone any guys that can't count the number of times.
 

avi8tor

Well-Known Member
Having your first 4 or 5 checkpoints 5 miles apart is a little excessive.

[ QUOTE ]
I can't count the number of times I have been sitting at an airport when a student landed asking where they were. And, it all stems from not getting on course immidiatly after TO.



[/ QUOTE ]
I have been flying for quite a few years and have never seen this happen.
 

jetman

New Member
Sorry about the
/////
Drummerboy and Steve C they seem to know what i was talking about

Set-heading point is one of the three types of departures that i know, Overhead /Enroute/ the other two.
Tnx all for input
 
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