MEI Questions

immune83

New Member
I'm getting my MEI soon, should be an easy ride BUT...
  1. Any advice you wish you would have known before hand?
  2. How was your check ride, what maneuvers did you have to do?
  3. What questions were you asked in the oral?
  4. Was everything as expected or were you thrown a curve ball?
Thanks

**yes I know there are many threads on this subject, just adding to the pile...
 

esa17

Well-Known Member
The MEI is easiest checkride to take. You've already passed the hard one and demonstrated your ability to fly when you got your multi-com. A Vyse demo is very straight forward and a simple maneuver to perform. There are no real curveballs to be thrown unless you get a "super-pilot" for an examiner. Know the systems inside and out, study the "flying light twins safely" pamphlet from the FAA and you will be fine.
 

CoffeeIcePapers

Well-Hung Member
Mine was straight forward. My examiner was really good and showed me different scenarios he had seen students put him in. He was showing me how someone of them start increasing the bank and hardly press the rudder, and how dangerous it was. He showed me a few different ways students have tried to kill him in the plane.
 

Clocks

Well-Known Member
My DE had me teach him while he flew some. On engine failures make sure you guard the rudder pedals with your feet and later the mixture controls with your hand. Some of them like to intentionally push down the wrong pedal when you fail an engine on them and/or intentionally pull back the wrong mixture control. Also if he wants you to give him an engine failure on takeoff BE READY TO PULL BACK BOTH MIXTURES IF HE DOESNT BRING BOTH THROTTLES TO IDLE IMMEDIATELY (I highly doubt he'll let you go off the side of the runway, but a student will).

All 3 are real world scenarios. I had students jump on the wrong pedal, had them pulling REALLY hard on the wrong mixture control, and had them try to stand on the brakes with one engine at full throttle on the runway. That's all stuff you should know but I know for me personally it was too easy for me to "relax" on checkrides knowing the person next to be had X thousand hours in the seminole.
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
Easily one of the easiest check rides. It is straight forward and it will be very similar to you comm-add-on but this time you will have to talk while you do it. You will also show a drag demo to he DE. Besides that, much of the song remains the same.

i would chair fly the maneuvers so you can do only a few training flights.
 

Sidious

Well-Known Member
Did mine about 2 months ago. Easy. For regs, just know what you can and cannot do with your MEI. Also questions like - do you need to have 5 hours make and model if you do a flight review? Do you need instrument proficency in a multi if you have it in a helicopter?

Flying is straight foward and no curve balls.

Good luck and let us know how it goes
 

DL31082

Well-Known Member
My MEI seems to have been harder then everyone else's because it was also my intial CFI ride. The oral was most multi-engine aerodynamics. In the flight we did steep turns, power on and off stalls, Vmc demo, Engine failure/secure/restart, emergency descent, turns around a point, and a single engine landing. It wasn't real hard, but I don't think I would call it easy either.
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
immune - this isn't the initial is it? if it is I take back the easy part.

Anyway, they will get you with some thing, they always do,
the thing he tripped me up with was, "what is is called when Vmc is the same as Vs.
The answer is Critical Vmc.
pretty dang critical, and it was something I never heard until he told me.
 

c172captain

Well-Known Member
Appreciate the replies folks. I will be taking my MEI hopefully before the New Year and am glad I'm reading this thread :nana2:
 

immune83

New Member
immune - this isn't the initial is it? if it is I take back the easy part.

Anyway, they will get you with some thing, they always do,
the thing he tripped me up with was, "what is is called when Vmc is the same as Vs.
The answer is Critical Vmc.
pretty dang critical, and it was something I never heard until he told me.

Lol, no this is not my initial I have been instructing for about 1.5yr, and please GOD I hope for not much longer...

Who else wants to share....?:)
 

T2on2y

New Member
I would know the theory of sideslip & zero sideslip very well and a good knowlege of VMC...how do you know when your at vmc? below vmc? how to reduce vmc quickly? how can vmc be higher than published? etc...
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
Is the "how to reduce Vmc quickly" a trick question, think about it questions or abc123 question?
Better yet, just tell me your answer and I will see if it matches how I would respond to it.
 

Douglas

Old School KSUX
10 points,
that was my first choice.

I thought maybe you were going for the seven factors affecting Vmc.

When I introduce Vmc to my students, I break it down and call the throttle on the operating engine, "My Vmc lever. With it open Vmc exists, when I close it Vmc doesn't exist anymore."
 

T2on2y

New Member
Thats a pretty good way to keep it simple.

I've found out that a quick dry run on the ground, and drill the student on VMC theory really helps the student understand what is actually happening during the maneuver. Keeping it simple and breaking things down is key IMHO.
 

caliginousface

Frank N. Beans
She got me on where to find this answer, even though I knew the answer: What speed do you practice engine cuts on the runway?
 
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