How does a freight career work?

juan valdez

Well-Known Member
I know, or am under the impression at least, that with an airline job you can live in one city and work out of another. Is it possible at all to do this with smaller freight companies and or larger ones?
I'm moving back to Texas to finish up all my ratings and I completely understand I ahve a ways to go til I am even looking at any sort of career hire. But I am also contemplating buying a house in Houston, but don't want to get into the hassle of ownership if I will be moving again soon.
I still need to get commercial license and up, then of course build time, but with house prices the way they are their is some tempting choices out there. I figure it will be at least 1.5 years til im done with college and able to finsih up commercial through MEI, and then after that; time building.
Anyone have any thoughts?
Also are there good options of places to start out flying freight in Houston area?
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
Most of the "starter" freight jobs (like Airnet, Wiggins, and Ameriflght) don't work so well for commuters. There are a few exceptions, but the ones I mentioned already as well most other smaller freight companies are 4 or 5 day runs with weekends off. If your goal is UPS or FedEx, which will be a LONG time from now, those can be commutable.
 

juan valdez

Well-Known Member
Yeah, please don't get me wrong. I def understand UPS or FedEx is a long way off, if at all. I'm just kinda wondering what opportunities would be in Houston area, if any. I just don't want to get stuck with a house that I have to sell in 1.5 years because I thought I would be there longer and an opportunity came along. I know its hard to predict that sort of thing but.....
 

ctab5060X

Well-Known Member
Most of the small freight companies will state "must be willing to relocate" in their pilot ads. That being said, you can get a job with a small freight company without having to move, or by moving where you want to be. Just like anything else in aviation, it requires good networking and a little luck at being in the right place at the right time.
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
If you want to fly 135 freight very long you need to keep your life "portable". Basicly you need to be able to pack up and move to a base with the least amount of hassel possible. Your base may close, or you may need to move in order to upgrade. Weighing yourself down with things like a house, pets, ect will limit your options.

Some of the larger 135 freight operators have limited jumpseat options. Pilots with my company can ride only on SWA, but we can't ride in the cockpit so we can easily get bumped.

Later if you get on with UPS or FedEx you can settle down to a more "conventional" pilot lifestyle.
 

juan valdez

Well-Known Member
ok guys thanks. Sounds like even though an entry level freight job is a few years away its best not to settle down at all yet. IE house etc
 

nathon11

New Member
Hi juan, you have to wait for some time to get information on flying freight because i am working on a website which can fulfill your requirement.
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
x 3

This website is the best resource for the low time potential professional pilot I've run across. Wish it had existed when I was a youngun.

We're still not holding hands in the shower, jetcareers.
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
Nah, I only know of ONE "hand" that wildfreightess was holding in a shower...and everyone present has been sworn to eternal secrecy about that. :buck:
 

atpwannabe

Well-Known Member
Most of the "starter" freight jobs (like Airnet, Wiggins, and Ameriflght) don't work so well for commuters. There are a few exceptions, but the ones I mentioned already as well most other smaller freight companies are 4 or 5 day runs with weekends off. If your goal is UPS or FedEx, which will be a LONG time from now, those can be commutable.
Not picking on you dc3, but why does everyone say that. I met a guy who flies for UPSCO, we did a career fair together, and he told me that someone could have as little as 2500 hours...if the interviewing board feels as though the guy/girl is a good fit and that the other pilots can "live" with that person, they are more apt to be hired than someone with 10K+ hours and no personality.

Just an observation.



atp
 

Boris Badenov

Just running in to a burning house...
If the guy/girl is actually a girl and has 14 internal recommendations, a spotless training record, and the ability to sell ice to an eskimo (basically I'm talking about wildfreightess...except she'd probably half of the controllers in the lower 48 calling on her behalf, too), sure. Otherwise, adjust your expectations downward or you're going to be sorely disappointed. Fly because you enjoy your job. If you're flying because you're just biding your time to get the 10 day workmonth and six figure starter check, you'll quit long before any of that stuff happens.
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
Not picking on you dc3, but why does everyone say that. I met a guy who flies for UPSCO, we did a career fair together, and he told me that someone could have as little as 2500 hours...if the interviewing board feels as though the guy/girl is a good fit and that the other pilots can "live" with that person, they are more apt to be hired than someone with 10K+ hours and no personality.

Just an observation.



atp
Well, the original poster has not even finished his ratings yet, he siad in the original post that he plans on 1.5 years to finish his degree and ratings. So at that time he will have, oh let's say 350 hours. It takes a while to get even 2500 hours from that point. I would estimate at least 4 years.

So to answer your question, I say it will be a LONG time because I think he will not even have the minimums to have the guts to put in an application at UPS or FEDEX for at least 5 years. These two companies may not even exist by then :laff:; and if they do no one knows what the hiring situation will be then.
 
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