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FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operations)

v1valarob

Well-Known Member
While searching USAJobs.gov I found this:

SALARY RANGE: 82,961.00 - 127,442.00 USD per year
OPEN PERIOD: Monday, September 08, 2008
to Tuesday, October 14, 2008
SERIES & GRADE: FG-1825-13/14
POSITION INFORMATION: Full Time Permanent
DUTY LOCATIONS:Few vacancies - Washington DC
WHO MAY BE CONSIDERED: All Sources

JOB SUMMARY: DESTINATIONFAA - Land the Perfect Job

About the FAA Employment Information
Amendment Date: 09/29/2008
Amendment Note: This vacancy has been extended.

Organization Location: Washington HQ, Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety, Flight Standards Service, General Aviation and Commercial Division, GA Operations and Certification Branch and Commercial Operations Branch

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED: ALL APPLICANTS MUST MEET THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS:
The single agency qualifications standard is used. In addition to meeting the general experience requirements, applicant must possess specialized experience which is in, or directly related to, the line of work of the position to be filled and which has equipped the candidate with the particular knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform the duties of the position. To be creditable, 52 weeks of the required experience must have been at least equivalent to the next lower grade level in the normal line of progression for the occupation. Minimum Eligibility Requirements - All applicants must meet the following requirements: (1) Not more than 2 separate incidents involving FAA violations in the last 5 years; (2) Must possess a valid state driver's license; (3) Must be fluent in the English language; (4) No chemical dependencies or drug abuse that could interfere with job performance; and (5) Must be a high school graduate or equivalent.
MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS:
Applicants must be physically able to perform efficiently the duties of the Aviation Safety Inspector position. They must:
1. Have good distant vision in each eye and be able to read without strain printed materials the size of typewritten characters (glasses and contact lenses permitted);
2. Have the ability to hear the conversational voice (hearing aid permitted); and
3. Not have any physical condition that would cause them to be a hazard to themselves or others or that would interfere with their ability to fly as passengers in a variety of aircraft.

In addition, applicants for positions that require participation in the operation of aircraft must:
1. Possess a valid first-class medical certificate in accordance with FAA regulations; and
2. Pass recurrent medical examinations as prescribed by the FAA.

GENERAL AVIATION OPERATIONS INSPECTOR:
Specialized Experience:
1. Pilot experience that provided a comprehensive knowledge of operations requirements, facilities, practices, procedures, and flight activities of aircraft; and
2. Minimum 1,500 total flight hours.

Recency of Specialized Experience -- all of the following:
1. Some aviation work experience within the last 10 years;
2. Minimum 300 flight hours in the last 3 years; and
3. Minimum 1,000 flight hours in the last 5 years.

Certificates and Ratings - all of the following:
1. Airline Transport Pilot Certificate or Commercial Pilot Certificate with instrument airplane rating;
2. Single and multiengine land airplane ratings; and
3. Valid Flight Instructor Certificate with single and multiengine airplane and instrument airplane ratings.

Other Requirements:
1. Professional flying skill as demonstrated in a flight check to Commercial Pilot Certificate with an Instrument Rating standard; and
2. Not more than two flying accidents in the last 5 years.

http://jobsearch.usajobs.gov/getjob...=0&ss=0&SUBMIT1=Search+for+Jobs&TabNum=1&rc=7
 

CRJDriver

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

I was about half way through the job application applying for the Aviation Safety Inspector job on the Air Carrier Operations side, until I had one on of the FAA guys in my jumpseat a few weeks ago. I basically picked his brain about his job. If you like flying, this is not the job for you! He told me they send you to training for 3 months in OKC and all you do is study the FARs. The job involves a lot of paperwork as well. The pay and pension is very good, but other than that, it didn't sound like a fun job to me, because I like flying way too much. Just thought I'd throw it out there.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

I was about half way through the job application applying for the Aviation Safety Inspector job on the Air Carrier Operations side, until I had one on of the FAA guys in my jumpseat a few weeks ago. I basically picked his brain about his job. If you like flying, this is not the job for you! He told me they send you to training for 3 months in OKC and all you do is study the FARs. The job involves a lot of paperwork as well. The pay and pension is very good, but other than that, it didn't sound like a fun job to me, because I like flying way too much. Just thought I'd throw it out there.
I had a buddy quit this job after just six months, said it was the worst job he's ever had, the environment was terrible.
 

pilot4500

IT Manager/ Former Cirrus Charter Pilot
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

Is relocation to Washington DC required if you get hired for this job?
 

youneek28

New Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

This job seems to be a hard one to actually get. I put my stuff and am crossing my fingers. Does anyone know if they hire people that are not members of AARP? Seems to be somewhat of an older crowd running around the FSDO.
 

SpiraMirabilis

Possible Subversive
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

You notice that ASI's are old because they're lifers and the younger guys usually quit after a year. It's a hard and mostly thankless job.
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

So you go around and bust other pilots? greatttt job
 

Diamnd15

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

applied, and didn't make the referral list...
 

SFCC/UND

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

I talked to the FAA about this job and they said that you might get to hand fly an airplane maybe 50 hours a year. If you want job security, than this is a good job.
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

So what other job could you get with two accidents and two separate incidents containing violations within the last five years? :bandit:
 

TangoBravo

New Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

Is relocation to Washington DC required if you get hired for this job?
Not at all. They either hire you into a FSDO and send you off for training in OK CTY. 50 hours a year? BS! I hear you have to be a "teamplayer" to exist within a FSDO Office - and that word is not meant in the best possible way.
 

SFCC/UND

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

So what other job could you get with two accidents and two separate incidents containing violations within the last five years? :bandit:
Maybe you just stay away from airplanes LOL.
 

Houston

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

Allow me to address some of the questions raised in this thread:

(1) This particular announcement appears to be limited to Washington, D.C. and would therefor probably require relocation to that area. It is an "odd" announcement because it lists the starting grade as FG-13 (GS-13). Most FSDO inspector jobs start at FG-12 (GS-12) and quickly progress to FG-13 after a year of training in class and on the job training (OJT). However, there are announcement for other locations and throughout the USA.

I was about half way through the job application applying for the Aviation Safety Inspector job on the Air Carrier Operations side, until I had one on of the FAA guys in my jumpseat a few weeks ago. I basically picked his brain about his job. If you like flying, this is not the job for you! He told me they send you to training for 3 months in OKC and all you do is study the FARs. The job involves a lot of paperwork as well. The pay and pension is very good, but other than that, it didn't sound like a fun job to me, because I like flying way too much.
(2) He was correct about it not being a flying job. There are some flying jobs in the FAA, but they aren't starter positions and whether they are good or bad jobs is in the eye of the beholder. He was incorrect about the 3 months of training in OKC where all you do is study FARs. A long time ago it was 14 weeks in OKC on a wide variety of classes. More recently, the 14 weeks was divided into three different chunks totaling 14 weeks. Then a few years ago the number of weeks was cut way down and a large part of the training was replaced with OJT back in the home station. The job is more paperwork than many people like, however, it isn't as overwhelming as many would like to contend. The truth is that to people who aren't good at communications and computers, it is a lot of overwhelming paperwork. Someone who has communication skills and understands there really isn't an "any key" on the computer won't find the paperwork so crushing. The pension was good when it was the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS). However, around 1984, the government switched to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS). FERS is an okay retirement system and it is better than no retirement system at all, but it isn't as good as CSRS was. Then again, things are constantly changing. Right now, it looks like some changes may be made to the way FERS credits sick leave. With the change in administrations, anything (good or bad) is possible.

I had a buddy quit this job after just six months, said it was the worst job he's ever had, the environment was terrible.
(3) I can top that. I've seen people quit the same morning they reported to work once the boss explained the job to them (which always struck me as a failure during the interview process). The "environment" varies greatly depending on the location. The managers can make or break the job. However, I can assure you there are offices where everybody (I say again, EVERYBODY) is appreciative of their job and wouldn't go back to their old job for anything. That "everybody" includes airline captains, F/Os, 135, military, and corporate pilots.

This job seems to be a hard one to actually get. I put my stuff and am crossing my fingers. Does anyone know if they hire people that are not members of AARP? Seems to be somewhat of an older crowd running around the FSDO.
(4) It does require a relatively high amount of flight time and recent flight time to meet the basic qualifications. However, once over that hump, it is more a matter of timing and willingness to relocate. If you want the job, get your name on the list and keep your application current. Also, the more locations you are willing to accept, the greater are the chances of being hired. Yes, the average inspector is not a kid. Everyone has had a career before they come to work as an inspector. It is not uncommon for "retired" professionals to come to work as inspectors.

You notice that ASI's are old because they're lifers and the younger guys usually quit after a year. It's a hard and mostly thankless job.
(5) I recognize that the job varies greatly from location to location, but what I have seen does not validate the statement that younger guys quit after a year. The words "hard" and "thankless" are relative. It is a demanding job.

So you go around and bust other pilots? greatttt job
(6) If one is the kind of person who sees someone on the highway driving recklessly and endangering other drivers and immediately thinks "I hope the police don't get him", then this isn't the job for them. Enforcement is a small part of the job, but if a person isn't willing to support aviation safety when needed, they would be happier in another job.

So what other job could you get with two accidents and two separate incidents containing violations within the last five years?
(7) I know several 121 and 135 operators who have no limit on such things, but that doesn't equate to being hired.

I will not reply to any posts, but if you seek assistance, send me a private message.
 

Houston

Well-Known Member
Re: FAA Aviation Safety Inspector (General Aviation Operatio

Update as of February 28, 2009:

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ahr/jobs_careers/occupations/av_safety_insp/#faqASI

There are currently nine job announcement for Aviation Safety Inspectors. Many of the announcements are for grade levels that are lower than any I have ever heard the FAA offering for Aviation Safety Inspectors before. I have been told that is to lower the standards so more “diversity” could be gained.

You can find the job announcements at jobs.faa.gov The aviation safety inspector position are all series 1825, so you can use that to narrow your scan.
 
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