CRJ Drivers - Need Your Help

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
Those of you who fly the CRJ-200 are probably very familiar with the new icing limitations, especially on the ground when it's clear as a bell but the temperature is below 5 degrees C. This is all due to several crews (not 121 mind you) that were careless and reckless. Recently there was a 200 that had to have the leading edge replaced because it was warped. This was a direct result from the new icing limitations on the ground.

I'm in the training department at PSA and we're looking at this very closely and visiting our options. We're trying to get in touch with people in the training departments at other companies that operate the CRJ-200. If you have contact information/names of people in the your CRJ-200 training programs it would be much appreciated. I don't need the heads of you entire training department, but possibly those people who oversee pilot training or Line/Sim Checkairman Supervisors.

If you'd be willing to pass this on to me via PM it's much appreciated, please don't post it on this open forum. If you're weary of giving out the info you can leave your e-mail address and I'll send an e-mail from my company e-mail address to show that I'm legit. I think networking with pilots and training departments from other companies can greatly enhance safety and the way we operate the airplane.
 

NC_BE300

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a good idea.

2 trips ago we had the "ANTI-ICE DUCT" WARNING message during climb, in icing conditions. There was some talk going around that this result would be a part of these new procedures....(eg. all this protection turned on alot more).... any truth to that or just another guy flappin the lip?
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
It could be very true, the plane with the warped leading edge had some sort of malfunction and one of the valves remained stuck open.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Eh another task that adds complication to something that should be simple. The big irony is that a flight crew who would be unlikely to safely accomplish the simple task will be even less likely to accomplish the new, 'safer' procedure.

Seriously, how hard is it to rotate 3 degrees per second.

I've nothing useful to say... just wanted to vent :)
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
Eh another task that adds complication to something that should be simple. The big irony is that a flight crew who would be unlikely to safely accomplish the simple task will be even less likely to accomplish the new, 'safer' procedure.

Seriously, how hard is it to rotate 3 degrees per second.

I've nothing useful to say... just wanted to vent :)
That was my thought. A guy that gets in trouble rotating to fast to 15 degrees is gonna get in the same trouble rotating too fast to 10 degrees......
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
They rotated at appoximately 7 degrees per second.

On February 2, 2005, about 0718 eastern standard time, a Bombardier Challenger CL-600-1A11, N370V, ran off the departure end of runway 6 at Teterboro Airport (TEB), Teterboro, New Jersey, at a ground speed of about 110 knots; through an airport perimeter fence; across a six-lane highway (where it struck a vehicle); and into a parking lot before impacting a building. The two pilots were seriously injured, as were two occupants in the vehicle. The cabin aide, eight passengers, and one person in the building received minor injuries. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postimpact fire. The accident flight was an on-demand passenger charter flight from TEB to Chicago Midway Airport, Chicago, Illinois. The flight was subject to the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 and operated by Platinum Jet Management, LLC (PJM), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, under the auspices of a charter management agreement with Darby Aviation (Darby), Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
Here's something BBD didn't think about, what if it's clear and a million up and down the east coast, but cold and your wings are deferred? I'll let you do the math.

Here's to Canadia!

[YT]71AQyuJDWkQ[/YT]
 
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