Coal-powered airplane

Fixtur

Prefamulated Amulite
It's FL, so it's NatGas powered.

They really need to up their solar game there. Such an unused resource.

But cool on the electric plane! Some partners and I are looking at buying a Pipistrel Virus. 165kt cruise at 4gal/hr!

Fix
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
It's FL, so it's NatGas powered.

They really need to up their solar game there. Such an unused resource.

But cool on the electric plane! Some partners and I are looking at buying a Pipistrel Virus. 165kt cruise at 4gal/hr!

Fix
What do they go for? (ballpark)

I can't imagine their electric trainer isn't the future of primary training.
 

QXDX

Well-Known Member
What do they go for? (ballpark)

I can't imagine their electric trainer isn't the future of primary training.
I could see that airplane as a primary trainer, but with a restriction limiting the certificate holder to electric powerplants only. Aspiring professionals would at some point have to transition to reciprocating or turbine powerplants.

The article mentions 50 minutes of flight time with 10 minutes reserve. I wonder if that is with a full suite of avionics.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
I could see that airplane as a primary trainer, but with a restriction limiting the certificate holder to electric powerplants only. Aspiring professionals would at some point have to transition to reciprocating or turbine powerplants.

The article mentions 50 minutes of flight time with 10 minutes reserve. I wonder if that is with a full suite of avionics.
Curious how the FAA treats the "land with 30-minutes fuel available" bit with this.
 

fholbert

Mod's - Please don't edit my posts!
Curious how the FAA treats the "land with 30-minutes fuel available" bit with this.
I’m thinking the same thing. 10 minute reserve isn’t much if the one runway gets closed and you have to find another airport.

Also wondered how long the battery lasts doing touch and goes.
 

Richman

JC’s Resident Curmudgeon
It's FL, so it's NatGas powered.

They really need to up their solar game there. Such an unused resource.

But cool on the electric plane! Some partners and I are looking at buying a Pipistrel Virus. 165kt cruise at 4gal/hr!

Fix
Curious name for the current times.

Solar means nothing without a bucket to put it in.
 

zmiller4

Well-Known Member
Whoa…I went to middle and high school with Isaac. We talked about airplanes a lot, I didn’t know he had made it a career.

@fholbert ‘s comment about touch and goes is pretty on point…in my short experience with electric vehicles, intermittent high power demands kills battery life.

But I also wonder if they can get a windmilling prop to somehow recharge the batteries and increase efficiency.
 

QXDX

Well-Known Member
I could see that airplane as a primary trainer, but with a restriction limiting certificate holder to electric powerplants only.

The article mentions 50 minutes of flight time with 10 minutes reserve. Is that with full avionics functionality?
Curious how the FAA treats the "land with 30-minutes fuel available" bit with this.
Ok, so it can fly 30 minutes with a 30 minute reserve. This is not the end-all of electric aviation. With R&D there will be improvements.
 

arkflyr

Well-Known Member
Curious name for the current times.

Solar means nothing without a bucket to put it in.
I saw this a while back, it would be pretty cool if they can make it work.


That plus the plans to convert existing coal fired plants to nuclear up here in WY and MT, I think is a great way to use what existing infrastructure is there and move away from coal.

 

Richman

JC’s Resident Curmudgeon
Ok, so it can fly 30 minutes with a 30 minute reserve. This is not the end-all of electric aviation. With R&D there will be improvements.
You're going to need more than improvements. You're going to need something more than evolutionary. It's going to need to be revolutionary.

Eeeking out a couple of percent in the airframe isn't gong to help and neither will a hyper-efficient motor (they're already there).

This is a battery problem, plain and simple, and for now, there is no solution.
 

fholbert

Mod's - Please don't edit my posts!
Do keep in mind the first Wright Brothers first flight in 1903 was 120'.

In 1964 the SR-71 was traveling in excess of mach 3.

In 1969 the 747 was flying and we put two guys on the moon.

!n 1979 the Mad Dog 80 was flying... Okay the last one means nothing.
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
Oh wait, so it's not directly coal powered? Never mind, I was thinking of something different.


I love rednecks with welding equipment and too much time on their hands.
 

Beefy McGee

Well-Known Member
The FAA is paying them $85k for the first 50 hours of flight data? Heck, I can fly a plane 100 hours a month at those rates.
 

QXDX

Well-Known Member
You're going to need more than improvements. You're going to need something more than evolutionary. It's going to need to be revolutionary.

Eeeking out a couple of percent in the airframe isn't gong to help and neither will a hyper-efficient motor (they're already there).

This is a battery problem, plain and simple, and for now, there is no solution.
I can't speak to the engineering problems. I just know that in the history of all things that work, there was once a time when that thing didn't work.

The larger issue is that it's still a fossil fuel powered vehicle. Unless you're going to hook the battery to a solar panel or windmill, you have to burn fossil fuels to get the electricity for it to run.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
I can't speak to the engineering problems. I just know that in the history of all things that work, there was once a time when that thing didn't work.

The larger issue is that it's still a fossil fuel powered vehicle. Unless you're going to hook the battery to a solar panel or windmill, you have to burn fossil fuels to get the electricity for it to run.
In California our electrical grid is already overwhelmed, they recently passed legislation that is supposed to phase out internal combustion vehicles by 2035. Where is all of this power supposed to come from?
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
In California our electrical grid is already overwhelmed, they recently passed legislation that is supposed to phase out internal combustion vehicles by 2035. Where is all of this power supposed to come from?
Yup. I said the same thing when newsom announced it. Lotta pro-climate change acts/rules. Few to back up the HOW it will be done.

I’m in Torrance and there are many times when the temperature is expected to be 90 or more, and we get told to minimize AC. Eg, minimize use 2pm-8pm. How much you want to bet in 2036 that all of California plugs cars in overnight 8pm-5am and will overload the system? Then the messages will come to please avoid overnight power use. :rolleyes:

Sorry, but I have AC *specifically* for when that temperature goes hot (above 85).
 

fholbert

Mod's - Please don't edit my posts!
In California our electrical grid is already overwhelmed, they recently passed legislation that is supposed to phase out internal combustion vehicles by 2035. Where is all of this power supposed to come from?
The bigger question is. If they shut down the natural gas storage facilities at Porter Ranch, Honor Rancho and Playa Del Ray, how will Edison generate electricity?

The media hasn't asked that question yet.
 
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