Another Spin on the Nav Light Issue

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KOAK Flyer

Well-Known Member
Hey everyone,

I wanted to take the nav light issue that was previously discussed one step further. Let's say that, in this case, you are flying your 172RG to a remote airport for dinner (for some of the California pilots out there, we'll say Harris Ranch). The airport I am talking about has no maintenance facilities or FBOs, only a restaurant. You eat dinner and come out to do the preflight and discover that the right nav light is inoperative (by this time it will have been well after sunset). You decide to abide by the regulations and will wait until sunrise to take the aircraft back home. However, the regulations also state that, since that item is inoperative, it must be deactivated and placarded before you fly the aircraft in the morning (assume no MEL). Fine, you say, I will do just that. Page 8-10 in The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge talks about how to go about doing this and says that you can deactivate this item by pulling the circuit breaker. However, your 172RG (like the one I fly) only has a push-to-reset type of circuit breaker for the nav light. How, then, do you deactivate the equipment? And, if you can't, how would you be legal for flight without calling out a mechanic to fix the problem?
 
R

Roger, Roger

Guest
Wait the night, the put duct tape over the switch with "inop" scrawled on there.
 

dahhcon

Well-Known Member
I've heard many pilots say that they dont even check the lights because they do not want to face the problem.
 

ctab5060X

Well-Known Member
Hey everyone,

I wanted to take the nav light issue that was previously discussed one step further. Let's say that, in this case, you are flying your 172RG to a remote airport for dinner (for some of the California pilots out there, we'll say Harris Ranch). The airport I am talking about has no maintenance facilities or FBOs, only a restaurant. You eat dinner and come out to do the preflight and discover that the right nav light is inoperative (by this time it will have been well after sunset). You decide to abide by the regulations and will wait until sunrise to take the aircraft back home. However, the regulations also state that, since that item is inoperative, it must be deactivated and placarded before you fly the aircraft in the morning (assume no MEL). Fine, you say, I will do just that. Page 8-10 in The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge talks about how to go about doing this and says that you can deactivate this item by pulling the circuit breaker. However, your 172RG (like the one I fly) only has a push-to-reset type of circuit breaker for the nav light. How, then, do you deactivate the equipment? And, if you can't, how would you be legal for flight without calling out a mechanic to fix the problem?
So, I take it you are part 91?

If you have a spare bulb (good idea to keep one in the airplane) and a screwdriver, change it yourself and go home.
 

SierraPilot123

Well-Known Member
Remove (can't in this case) deactivate (collar the circuit breaker) and placard INOP by and "appropriately rated personnel"

Now, the question is, are YOU an "appropriately rated personnel"?
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Hey everyone,

I wanted to take the nav light issue that was previously discussed one step further. Let's say that, in this case, you are flying your 172RG to a remote airport for dinner (for some of the California pilots out there, we'll say Harris Ranch). The airport I am talking about has no maintenance facilities or FBOs, only a restaurant. You eat dinner and come out to do the preflight and discover that the right nav light is inoperative (by this time it will have been well after sunset). You decide to abide by the regulations and will wait until sunrise to take the aircraft back home. However, the regulations also state that, since that item is inoperative, it must be deactivated and placarded before you fly the aircraft in the morning (assume no MEL). Fine, you say, I will do just that. Page 8-10 in The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge talks about how to go about doing this and says that you can deactivate this item by pulling the circuit breaker. However, your 172RG (like the one I fly) only has a push-to-reset type of circuit breaker for the nav light. How, then, do you deactivate the equipment? And, if you can't, how would you be legal for flight without calling out a mechanic to fix the problem?
Burned out in flight.
 

jhugz

#lighttwin Mafia
:banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:


It amazes me how many people are willing to blatantly disregard regulations and then willing post that on a public forum.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
:banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:


It amazes me how many people are willing to blatantly disregard regulations and then willing post that on a public forum.
Think for yourself, it amazes how many people don't on this forum.
 

slushie

C56X ATP CFII MEI
Seems to me, if you're flying during the day, the whole deactivate/placard thing is not necessary.

Prove me wrong?
 
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