Aerobatic or Seaplane

WheatonPilot68

Well-Known Member
Just working on Time Building for my commercials right now and wanted to do something fun. Wandering what would be better/rewarding to do training in.

Thoughts?
 

youngflyer

Well-Known Member
I have a feeling that aerobatics will be something that is more applicable to your everyday flying. The seaplane is fun I am sure, but I am not sure how useful it is under normal conditions.
 

crazyjaydawg

Well-Known Member
Well Raskal, the primary issue is that (historically speaking,) more and more people are considering advanced degrees like high school diplomas. Fairly easy to get and everyone should have one.

Not saying that advanced degrees are less worthy, just that they are becoming increasingly common amongst job applicants.

Getting noticed by an airline is a multi-step process. Simply meeting the stated minimums will keep your application out of the secretary's wastebasket. Not having at least the average qualifications of the pool of applications will most likely mean your application will end up in the garbage can in the employment office even though you made it past the secretary by having the minimums.

I took a list of pilots that wanted jobs at Delta a few years back to Plato Rhyne, personally and even though one of my recommendations met the minimum requirements, he didn't possess the "magic number of the day" (1000 PIC turbine at the time) and he clearly told me to come see him again when my friend had at least that -- and this was after the time that Delta dropped it's PIC turbine requirement.

Everyone knows a story of people that made it to the majors with no college degree, but how many pilots hired in the last 5 years hired at American, United, Delta, Continental and Northwest have college degrees? Very few.

This is an ultra-competitive field, especially now and trying to get into one of the top 5 majors without a college degree is like "bringing a knife to a gunfight".

Believe me, I've met more than my share of disgruntled pilots that can't move to the airline which they'd really like to fly for that never bothered to get a degree.

The absolute SAFEST way to approach this career is to look at the "preferred qualifications" of any airline and treat those as mandatory minimums set in stone.
What is a step turn?

Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk 2
 

ryan1234

Desensitized Member
I'd say do both if you can... why not? I'm not sure there something groundbreaking airmanship wise that you're going to learn with either... but it may make you a better pilot. I enjoy(ed) both... really put the fun into flying. Confined Water take-offs can be some of the best fun in an airplane... as can flying (or on the step:)) under bridges in a flying boat.

Aerobatics can be a more humbling experience if you're trying to get parameters spot on (which you should try). Also, if you can find your way into doing some IAC stuff or air shows.... it can be very exciting and a great group of people.
 

jskibo

Done
What is a step turn?

Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk 2
Two stages to your takeoff in seaplanes, plow, then up on "Step", that middle part of the float before the back portion.

Step turn is full power, into the plow, up on step and bring power back to 2200 (in the case of the plane I learned in). That will keep you on step, but slow enough to not lift off. Now your water rudders are up, so the control surfaces and determining your turn rate, keep aileron into the turn (unlike the first part of a plow turn). If you make the turn too tight, the plane will want to roll and flip over to the outside of the turn so you have to manage the rudders carefully. It's an odd feeling as its like you're always skidding to the outside, I found myself leaning to the inside of the turn as a reaction to the force.

It's also a useful tool on a small lake as you can start in the downwind, complete your 180, and jam power forward to get off in a short distance.
 

Kingairer

'Tiger Team' Member
Personally I would probably enjoy Seaplane more. And its a conversation starter that youd have on your certificate when you apply somewhere. Both would be cool and both would have plusses.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
Aerobatic now, get the seaplane as a commercial add on. Then you could potentially earn money with the seaplane doing alaska tours, etc...

I may also be a little biased. I have a hard time keeping airplanes straight and level.
 

chrisreedrules

Master Blaster
I've done aerobatic training and it helps a lot with your day-to-day flying believe it or not. Doing spin/upset training in a fully-aerobatic aircraft does wonders for your confidence and knowledge of spins. It will make you a safer pilot for sure. If you haven't finished your Commercial ratings yet then I would hold off on the Seaplane stuff. Wait and do that until after you have your commercial because the practical test is virtually the same as the private except you will have commercial seaplane privileges.
 

crazyjaydawg

Well-Known Member
Two stages to your takeoff in seaplanes, plow, then up on "Step", that middle part of the float before the back portion.

Step turn is full power, into the plow, up on step and bring power back to 2200 (in the case of the plane I learned in). That will keep you on step, but slow enough to not lift off. Now your water rudders are up, so the control surfaces and determining your turn rate, keep aileron into the turn (unlike the first part of a plow turn). If you make the turn too tight, the plane will want to roll and flip over to the outside of the turn so you have to manage the rudders carefully. It's an odd feeling as its like you're always skidding to the outside, I found myself leaning to the inside of the turn as a reaction to the force.

It's also a useful tool on a small lake as you can start in the downwind, complete your 180, and jam power forward to get off in a short distance.
That is bad ass. Reason #30something for me to get my rating.
 

jskibo

Done
That is bad ass. Reason #30something for me to get my rating.
Can't recommend Tom enough if you're going to do seaplane. That 1947 Super Cruiser with the STC'd flaps and VGs is awesome. It stalls at 29mph, lifts off at 40. We did one glassy water on the gusty first day and as soon as I got the one float out of the water, at 25mph IAS, we were airborne. Still feels odd coming in over the trees at 20ft to do a short landing.

Go when it's cold, less boats and swimmers on the water.
 
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