206 augered in at PAMR

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Looks like two people bought it. I saw the smoke, and the impact site, it was a smoking hole, but no survivors. RIP.

-pat
 

Baronpilot244

Killick Stoker
Damn.......sure seems to be a lot of GA guys going in lately. A Saratoga went down in a residential area just North of PDK last Tuesday. Looks like it didn't have any fuel in it.

RIP

BP244
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
 

butt

New Member
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
I think the relatives have bigger things to worry about than what words someone else uses on an internet forum.
 

Holocene

Well-Known Member
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
Please...:cwm27:
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
Answers? how about don't try to turn around at 300ft without an engine? As for how I talk, well, what I saw today was pretty horrible so lay off.
 

loubetti

Pays to fly
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
I never liked those terms either, so you are not alone.

But, to each his own.
 

aloft

New Member
"Augered in"
"Bought it?"


Geeze. What are you? A 1940's fighter pilot? Sure hope relatives coming to site like this one to try and glean some answers from tragedy like this one don't have to read that.
Common aviation terminology. Deal with it.
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
Common aviation terminology. Deal with it.
Yeah whatever.

Too me it comes off as desensitized, and immature.
I am going to guess you have not lost a close friend in this industry yet. Give it time.
 

ozone

Well-Known Member
Student pilot question here:

From looking at the sat images, the pilot would have had to been taking off on runway 24. In my instruction book on take-off power-loss it talks about maintaining level flight as best as possible and quickly finding a place to land. So, to the more experienced folks out there....what would you have done? Check out google maps and see what you think about possible emergency landing spots (if any).

Personally, from what minuscule knowledge i have, i would have picked east 7th street, which dead ends into a cemetery with some trees about 1km from the end of the runway. That, with my limited knowledge, would seem to be the most survivable course of action (depending on traffic below of course)
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
With all the development that has encroached on the boundaries of airports in many areas, it is hard to find acceptable places to put an airplane down in the event of an engine loss on climb-out. In such a situation, you're almost assured of hitting something, but you're going to have a much better chance of walking away from it the lower to the ground you are and the slower you're going when you do hit something.

The airport where I did my PPL training at had about a total of 3/4 of a mile or more of golf course right off the end of the preferred use runway. There was no doubt where I would put it down if my engine went out there.

It looks to me like they were trying to turn to put it down on 15 or perhaps make the open area just to the west of there, on the news story link, you can see a green roof building and the control tower in the background, both easily identified on Google Maps.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Yeah whatever.

Too me it comes off as desensitized, and immature.
I am going to guess you have not lost a close friend in this industry yet. Give it time.

Desensitized, sure maybe, but that's not the point here, I was posting information about an accident that I saw with my own eyes less than five minutes after it happened. A smoking hole in the ground, that was all that was left. Who are you to judge me based off of what is in an internet forum? Maybe its my way of coping. You want to talk about desensitized, how about the fact that the language I use in my post bothers you more than the fact that 2 people died!


Ok, what I know now. According to ADN, and the eyewitnesses I talked to after I overflew the site, he lost his engine, and at about 200-300ft tried to turn back. There are plenty of places to go if you have an engine failure at MRI, I think about it almost every day, that should have been survivable, he just tried to turn back.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
With all the development that has encroached on the boundaries of airports in many areas, it is hard to find acceptable places to put an airplane down in the event of an engine loss on climb-out. In such a situation, you're almost assured of hitting something, but you're going to have a much better chance of walking away from it the lower to the ground you are and the slower you're going when you do hit something.

The airport where I did my PPL training at had about a total of 3/4 of a mile or more of golf course right off the end of the preferred use runway. There was no doubt where I would put it down if my engine went out there.

It looks to me like they were trying to turn to put it down on 15 or perhaps make the open area just to the west of there, on the news story link, you can see a green roof building and the control tower in the background, both easily identified on Google Maps.

By the way, 24 and 15 are now 25 and 16.
 

Scandinavian13

New Member
Student pilot question here:

From looking at the sat images, the pilot would have had to been taking off on runway 24. In my instruction book on take-off power-loss it talks about maintaining level flight as best as possible and quickly finding a place to land. So, to the more experienced folks out there....what would you have done? Check out google maps and see what you think about possible emergency landing spots (if any).

Personally, from what minuscule knowledge i have, i would have picked east 7th street, which dead ends into a cemetery with some trees about 1km from the end of the runway. That, with my limited knowledge, would seem to be the most survivable course of action (depending on traffic below of course)
I'm really impressed at how much you take in and question to learn.
I wouldn't go along with maintaining level flight, but making sure you know of a landing spot is cruicial. I think Google Earth/Maps could be a good tool in helping us all figure out spots for fudged takeoffs, but also consider the fact that sometimes Google doesn't clearly show light standards, street widths, traffic and power lines. It's great to look and say 7th street - at least you have more of an idea of the person who hasn't even looked. Just don't forget to re-evaluate when you start flying from there.

As for takeoffs and losses of power, I was always taught to shove it. Since I was taught to climb initially at 75, you're only 10 over best glide and still close to the clean stall of 48 (say 50 to be sure). If you lose power while in a climb, all those numbers come up quickly, so the best way to avoid getting too far below 75 is to shove the yoke in to get the nose down and adjust from there. It's harder than you think. With the trim set to TO, it'll require a good bit of pressure to get the nose down. From there, set it up for best glide and find something open, quickly.

Take a look at this and see if your instructor will go over it with you. It's not required per the PTS, but it'll help to increase your arsenal of safety measures:
http://flighttraining.aopa.org/cfi_tools/publications/inst_reports2.cfm?article=5920
 
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