Why spin training is important

mjg407

Well-Known Member
In July an USN P-3 (4 engine turboprop approx 100K lbs) crew was conducting an training mission with the #1 engine shut down. They had vibration on the #2 engine requiring shutdown got slow, entered stall buffet + Vmc Air and entered a spin (reported 5 rotations entered at 6000 feet). The crew pulled a reported 7 gs to recover the aircraft at an altitude of between 200 and 50 feet. The crew was able to land safely.

http://www.p3orion.nl/news.html

Very similar to this event from the 70s...

http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/media/approach/issues/novdec05/pdf/We_Just_Spun.pdf
 

Sidious

Well-Known Member
Wow, thats amazing... are there procedures for inadvertant spins like this situation when you advance to aircraft of that size or is it the same as in light twins with OEI.... Pray
 

mjg407

Well-Known Member
Wow, thats amazing... are there procedures for inadvertant spins like this situation when you advance to aircraft of that size or is it the same as in light twins with OEI.... Pray
well the biggest procedure is not to get yourself where you might spin one. C-90s spin fairly well, not P-3s. So their are no procedures because you aren't supposed to spin them, so rely on your training. All navy pilots spin the the T-34 at least a dozen times during training so they are all familiar with how to stop a spin.
 

fo4ever

Well-Known Member
Pictures of the aforementioned aircraft...

Now a parts bird..

The pic on the left is of the wing between #3 and #4 looking toward the fuselage, the aft nacelle of #3 is is view.

I'm glad it held together and all survived.
 

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