Where to now?

FL410

New Member
What can I say, I'm a lurker.


I'm 15, and I finished my PPL training this summer (I know, I started early but flying is so addicting.) Soloed at 14 (here in Canada). I've done all my XC flying, and since September I've just been flying the bare amount to stay current, and the odd XC here and there. I could build time for my CPL, but my CFI told me that I would need a license to do that, since I only have my student's license now, and I can get the rec at 16-this summer.

Time breakdown:

37.5 Dual
16.5 PIC
3.4 dual XC
7.0 PIC XC
1.9 Sim IFR-did a LOC/BC as well.

PIC XC time would of course be the most valuable to me at this point, but I can only fly approved routes, and there's only a couple of those so it doesn't challenge me at all.

What I'd really like to do is the instrument rating, but with the checkride at least 1.5 years away it doesn't seem worth it, and doing it in a twin would get me valuable Multi IFR time. I find the instrument flying natural, and we did much more than was required for the IR part of the PPL.

I'm curious as to what your opinions are, any advice is really appreciated.
 

757

New Member
I was in the same situation in a few months back. While I was waiting I stayed current with the Private stuff,flew a few XC too and began working on Instrument ground. Doing that taught me even more about flying, which I used for my Private check-ride.Pretty much do what ever that would be beneficial to you in the future.
 

kostcoguy

New Member
Welcome! All I can say is you are one lucky guy, getting all that time in, i am 17 and haven't started my ppl training. Good luck
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure what your question is or what you're looking for. You are way ahead of where I was at your age. You should talk your parents into getting into a partnership with a few other owners on a Cessna 150....you'll save a lot of dough in the long run.
 

Ecl!pse

Well-Known Member
Man, your ppl at 15 in Canada...I would kill for that! But, from some advice ive recieved, and read about, it sounds like it is best to wait a little bit before starting your instrument, so you can work on your skills youve just learned, and to log more PIC time...just some advice ive gotten, hope it helps
 

FL410

New Member
Hi guys,

Thanks for the welcome.
DE727, I was just asking what I should do next. As far as a partnership in a 150, that's an idea, since I'd like to fly as often as possible, but my parents want me to fly as little as I can at this point because of the cost (about $78USD wet for the PA28-140) and taking the commercial or instrument groundschool would be cool. Only thing is, for a partnership, I would have to get my CFI to sign me out everytime, since I only have a student permit, and that may cause some problems.

Mins here in Canada:

16- Rec license, 1 pax, day VFR.
17- PPL, IR-same as the States
18- CPL
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Welcome!

That's a REALLY open-ended question and you've given very little information. You could keep training, fly solo, work on the instrument, keep studying, or just plain wait. Fly safe!
 

FL410

New Member
Thanks Ed.

I did talk to my parents about buying into a plane, but they thought it was too risky and would be quite expensive by the time you add maintenance and insurance in. Any thoughts on that?
 

fly22

Well-Known Member
I own a 152 with a 125 horse conversion. I love it!!! It is an awesome way to build time. I've even flown it from Salt Lake City to Chicago on one tank. Well the one tank part is a joke but it is awesome to have your own plane. Personally at your age I wouldn't do it. I don't think you are responsible enough to keep up with the AD's. I'm not saying that you're imature ( PPL at 15 awesome) but rather there is a whole lot more to owning a plane than just paying for it.
 

FL410

New Member
Hehe, there's no way I could afford a plane. Maybe buying would as a partnership with some other guys (what's the term I'm missing.)

Cool stuff about your 152, I doubt I'd fit in one at 6'2"!
 

John_Jones

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Cool stuff about your 152, I doubt I'd fit in one at 6'2"!

[/ QUOTE ]
Oh no you dont! I am 6'5 220 (gaining daily though) and I own a C-152 and do most of my CFI work in it. So dont tell me you cant fit mister
...Its a tight squeeze (and like I said gets tighter and tighter daily) but I can fit, and it saves money.
 

TOMAHAWK

New Member
Hi there
I am 6 foot 4 and I fly the Tomahawk. I find this plane to be very spacious and I even have to put the seat forward a bit to touch the pedals nicely.

Also after flying the C152 I would say that the Tomahawk is a better training plane as it is less stable and I feel more challenging to fly. At least that is my opinion. And they self for relatively the same price so you can't go wrong.

Just another option for ya.

Regards Ryan
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Hi there
I am 6 foot 4 and I fly the Tomahawk. I find this plane to be very spacious and I even have to put the seat forward a bit to touch the pedals nicely.

Also after flying the C152 I would say that the Tomahawk is a better training plane as it is less stable and I feel more challenging to fly. At least that is my opinion. And they self for relatively the same price so you can't go wrong.

Just another option for ya.

Regards Ryan

[/ QUOTE ]

Anyone remember the Beechcraft BE-77 Skipper? Almost a copy of the PA-38. Of those that remember it, were there any major differences?
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
There aren't many Skippers around. Since they are a Beech product, I believe the general product and quality of the way there were put together was better. The tend to be more expensive, if you can find one. They have the same engine and look to be almost the same plane.
 

Freight Guy

New Member
Yep, I think the biggest difference between the two is that the Skipper didn't have the in flight quick release installed on the tail.

 
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