What would you do?

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
Let's assume you have approximately 175hrs, with IR and all the experience requirements for the commercial (except for the 250hrs, obviously). Let's also assume you are in a flight club with a Cherokee 180 for $80/hr and a C177RG for $100/hr, but no twins. Finally, let's assume that your current goals are to get your CPL ME IR and CFI, CFII, and MEI.

Do you think it would make sense to get a Multi PPL now so that all the training for the Multi Commercial can be logged towards the 15hrs Multi PIC requirement of the MEI? Would you this?

Secondly, what is the benefit of doing the ME CPL as the initial over the SE? At what stage would you need to make the decision? Also, roughly how long should it take to learn the commercial maneuvers?

Finally, what is the benefit of doing the MEI or CFII as your initial instructor rating?

Thanks
 

esa17

Well-Known Member
Go for your CPL-SE first, otherwise you're taking no less than three multi engine checkrides and still left doing one for the SE. (Multi-PPL, Multi-CPL, MEI). Each checkride is going to require three hours of instruction at the bare legal minimum plus the two hour checkrides. Doing that math you will pretty much eliminate any monetary savings you think you might have stumbled upon and lets face facts, its going to take you more than three hours of training to get each one down. If you're looking to get paid for flying right out of the gate then the SE-CPL is the only way you can go. With very little multi-time and a wet CPL you will not find anyone willing to insure you in their aircraft....period. Get the single and you'll at least be able to do ferry work and burn off quality XC time.

As far as doing your MEI or CFII as your initial the area becomes a bit more gray. At my school there is a natural pecking order. The instructors who have been there the longest get the "advanced" students because while you and I will have passed the same instructor checkrides I have more experience than you. Think of it as the instructors version of seniority ladder. At my school I won't hire "just" a CFII or a MEI. Whatever checkride you take for your initial is going to be a bear but when it comes to employment I'm going to choose the guy that does me the most good.

Now, if you want to do it like ATP does and take your MEI, then CFII, then CFI thats ok just as long as you don't futz around. If you're like me, and trying to save all the money you can when it comes to this flying thing let me give you the single best piece of advice anyone could give:

The best way to save cash is to study hard and fly often.
 

minitour

New Member
Since you've got the requirements (save the 250) for the C-ASEL, do the C-ASEL first. Just fly the $80/hr plane until you get done and then do the checkride.

Then, do your C-AMEL add-on training from the right seat if you can, so you're already used to the sight picture over there. Then it's just making sure you understand and can teach while you're flying the maneuvers for 15 hours. Try to get an MEI that will take you on some cross countries as a part of the 15 hours, too. All IFR (filed), under the hood if necessary. Do lots of approaches, practice "low visibility" takeoffs if you can (hood partially obstructing forward view). I'm not a fan of 0/0 takeoffs, but if the CFI is comfortable with it, try one...see how you do. I always had my instrument students do one so they could see why it's one of those legal but not necessarily smart. things.

Have fun w/ training! I'm jealous! I loved that part of flying.

-mini
 

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
Cool, thanks for the replies.

Gonna follow your advice, fly my arse off and hit the books hard.

I had thought that I might have been more efficient with my hours by getting the ppl-multi, but I might as well just fly regularly and I should be able to get to the 250 in a month or so.
 

Do3r17

New Member
Cool, thanks for the replies.

Gonna follow your advice, fly my arse off and hit the books hard.

I had thought that I might have been more efficient with my hours by getting the ppl-multi, but I might as well just fly regularly and I should be able to get to the 250 in a month or so.
Lucky you. You should come pick me up and take me to Cancun! I'll spot your beer :D
 

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
OK, just to throw the proverbial spanner in the works. Suppose you really really wanted to get a seaplane rating at some stage in your career, and could afford to do so now, would it be worth getting the ppl ases, or waiting till I can get my cses? I can't see myself working for a float plane operator any time soon, but you never know...
 
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