What happens when a pilot is injured/sick

Propilot

Well-Known Member
So I'm in the process of making a plan for the future and considering many options. A friend of mine recently fell of his mountain bike (barely moving btw) and tore some ligaments. He couldn't fly for months on end. He had to use all his sick time, vacation, etc to make ends meet.

I'm thinking of running an independent contractor business and I'm wondering what the different risks, costs and benefits are of being an employee somewhere or self employed when it comes to getting injured or sick.


So, lets say two people. One guy and lets say a girl. Both make 75.93K per year. ;] One is working for a union carrier (major or regional or perhaps fractional), the other is an independent contractor/self employed (doing whatever, ski instruction, HVAC installation doesn't matter). Neither can work while injured.


They both happened to be at the airport, saw each other and were so attracted that they ran into each other and both ended up with broken legs. Ahgh! The luck!



Who is likely to come out on top and by how much?


Discuss.
 

PaulR

Well-Known Member
That's not an easy answer. There are many variables. As a pilot, as in most professionals careers, you accrue sick time and also have paid vacation each year. In the event of an accident that would prevent you from working you can use your accrued sick time. Lets say you have worked 10 years at the airline and have 210 hours left in your sick bank, as long as your injury doesnt keep you out of work longer than 210 hours worth of time your going to be paid your min garuantee. If you need more time due to a more serious injury you can use FMLA and sick time to cover the gap, if after you sick time is used you are still sick you need to have a loss of license insurrance policy. Otherwise you will have no paycheck comming in just like many other folks who get hurt. It is very important in this bussiness to have inssurance for loss of license and also to understand how different events will effect your pay, medical, and quality of life.

Thats just a basic answer but hope it gives you a peice of the pie.
 

Propilot

Well-Known Member
So, I mean either way if your an independent contractor or an employee, your going to need to purchase disability insurance.

That concern, along with a lack of retirement plan is what has kept me away from going the independent contractor route, but honestly you can't really count on an airline pension/retirement either.


I was thinking about all of the fun jobs that I have had and how to combine them. Im a flight instructor, ski instructor, skydive instructor, videographer/cameraman, etc etc. It would be pretty neat to combine all of that into a career.

I'm thinking I might becoming a fireman. I used to be a volunteer fireman/emt and I liked it. They have awesome schedules. In Utah its 24 on 24 off, 24 on 3 days off. repeat. Not bad!

Having a job like that would give me plenty of free days to pursue freelance flight instruction, ski instruction, and skydive instruction. But would also allow for a retirement and...something that I have realized is of the utmost importance...geographical stability! I have lived in 9 states and 3 continents chasing this career dream and I am so over it!

Plan is...

ANG Guard Bum + Fireman + Heli-Ski Guide + supplement with freelance flight/skydive/ski instruction/sportsvideographystills shooting and editing + maybe some sort of online business on the side.


I'm a genius!
 

grnclvrs

Well-Known Member
Lets say you have worked 10 years at the airline and have 210 hours left in your sick bank, as long as your injury doesnt keep you out of work longer than 210 hours worth of time your going to be paid your min garuantee. If you need more time due to a more serious injury you can use FMLA and sick time to cover the gap, if after you sick time is used you are still sick you need to have a loss of license insurrance policy. Otherwise you will have no paycheck comming in just like many other folks who get hurt. It is very important in this bussiness to have inssurance for loss of license and also to understand how different events will effect your pay, medical, and quality of life.

Unless you work for Allegiant where you get your guarantee for each and every month until you're fit to return to work. But we don't count as all our work rules suck and we're dragging down the industry.
 
Top