Weight and balance, but mostly balance.

Ryanm406638

Well-Known Member
Will it be an issue if the takeoff weight is too high forward on takeoff, but not on landing due to fuel consumption?

What will be the examiner's reaction if he and I are too heavy forward for a cherokee 140?

Thanks
 

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
What do you mean by "too high forward on takeoff"? You can not be over MGTOW and you cannot be outside of the 'envelope'.

The old cherokees are very nose-heavy, and it is very difficult to move yourself back into the envelope by adding weight in the baggage compartment. Only thing you can do is reduce your fuel load and plan for a fuel stop.
 

Beech driver

Well-Known Member
First off, welcome. :hiya:

More important question. Why would you want to show up for a check ride knowing you are out of weight and/or balance?
Do whatever is needed to get the airplane within the envelope.
 

ppilot

New Member
Will it be an issue if the takeoff weight is too high forward on takeoff, but not on landing due to fuel consumption?

What will be the examiner's reaction if he and I are too heavy forward for a cherokee 140?

Thanks
I suspect the examiner's reaction will be to fail you. If I'm understanding you correctly, it's quite dangerous to load an airplane with a cg forward of the forward cg limit.
 

tgrayson

New Member
Will it be an issue if the takeoff weight is too high forward on takeoff
The forward CG limit is set by the elevator having enough authority to raise the nosewheel off the ground when taking off or landing. During takeoff, if you can't lift the nose wheel, the airplane will "wheelbarrow", meaning you're rolling along the runway with the mains off the ground, but the nose wheel still making contact. This can create directional control problems. Not recommended.
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
Will it be an issue if the takeoff weight is too high forward on takeoff, but not on landing due to fuel consumption?
What will be the examiner's reaction if he and I are too heavy forward for a cherokee 140?
Thanks
Make sure you are within W/B limits (both). You'll certainly be failed if you aren't. An expensive mistake.:banghead: I've heard many stories of students having incorrectly figured the W/B also, and examiners love to gig that. Its a no-go gig, too.
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
My examiner just asked if I did it and looked over it, didn't check the POH to see if the numbers were good. I'm telling you right now put 10-15 pounds in the #2 compartment (the one behind the seats), you could just fill your flight bag with books and stuff to throw back there.

Most examiners just want to know that you won't kill yourself flying, they don't expect you to know everything (at the PPL anyway). I got some of my Basic VFR weather minimums mixed up and botched a soft-field landing over an obstacle (he let me retry and I did better) and still passed.
 

Hubbs

Well-Known Member
My examiner just asked if I did it and looked over it, didn't check the POH to see if the numbers were good. I'm telling you right now put 10-15 pounds in the #2 compartment (the one behind the seats), you could just fill your flight bag with books and stuff to throw back there.

The old Cherokees are very nose heavy and have a 'shallow edge of the envelope' - adding weight to the baggage compartment will take you over MGTOW before getting you back in the envelope. Adding weight to the tail cone might work, but I don't think there is a station for that sort of behavior. Don't turn up to your exam out of W&B, just plan for less fuel and have a fuel stop if necessary.
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
I know I had some extra weight to play around with so that's why. I remember it being barley within the envelope.
 
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