VFR in Class A?

pilatus028

New Member
This was a question asked from AOPA recently in one of their emails. It read something like blah blah blah....why is there VFR altitudes in Class A Airspace? The answer was in case your comms decide to quit on you, but yet I asked the instructors and a few examiners at the airport and they all had no clue really or they said something different from each other. I'm familiar with the Lost comms procedure for IFR, but it wouldn't make any sense to maintain a VFR altitude unless there is something I'm missing. I know you're supposed to maintain VFR while in VFR, but that doesn't mean (from what I've been told/taught/read) to deviate from the IFR altitudes. What is your take on this? I'm real interested.....

Thanks,
Clem
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
I think if you go lost comm in class A, you continue to follow your IFR flight plan as scheduled.
 

EricH

New Member
Thats interesting......in Canada there is no VFR allowed in Class A airspace. I thought this was standard in ICAO countries......
 

250blue

New Member
Yes, per the FAR/AIM, you cannot receive "VFR on Top" in class A. AIM 5-5-13. Interesting question.
 

pilatus028

New Member
But why do they have VFR altitudes above 18000 ft.? I know it's real strange, but it's in the AIM...check it out.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
But why do they have VFR altitudes above 18000 ft.?

[/ QUOTE ]That's a different question that your first one.

Your first one was [ QUOTE ]
why is there VFR altitudes in Class A Airspace

[/ QUOTE ] There are no VFR altitudes in US Class A airspace.

To answer your rewritten question, although =generally= Class A begins at 18000 msl, there are exceptions. For example, there is no Class A airspace over Hawaii.

[ QUOTE ]
§ 71.33 Class A airspace areas.
(a) That airspace of the United States, including that airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles of the coast of the 48 contiguous States, from 18,000 feet MSL to and including FL 600 excluding the states of Alaska and Hawaii, Santa Barbara Island, Farallon Island, and the airspace south of latitude 25°04'00" North.
(b) That airspace of the State of Alaska, including that airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles of the coast, from 18,000 feet MSL to and including FL 600 but not including the airspace less than 1,500 feet above the surface of the earth and the Alaska Peninsula west of longitude 160°00'00" West.
(c) The airspace areas listed as offshore airspace areas in subpart A of FAA Order 7400.9K (incorporated by reference, see § 71.1) that are designated in international airspace within areas of domestic radio navigational signal or ATC radar coverage, and within which domestic ATC procedures are applied.

[/ QUOTE ]
 

250blue

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
§ 71.33 Class A airspace areas.

(b) That airspace of the State of Alaska, including that airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles of the coast, from 18,000 feet MSL to and including FL 600 but not including the airspace less than 1,500 feet above the surface of the earth and the Alaska Peninsula west of longitude 160°00'00" West.

[/ QUOTE ]
This would seem irrelevant since the rule begins at 3,000' AGL.
 
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