Twin Otter Pilot question?

bidderswede

New Member
Worked with a pilot that killed himself in a Twin Otter.
NTSB said the elevator control lock pin was not removed, and that caused the crash.

I was also told that the checklist doesn't call for that to be removed until you are ready for Take Off????

True?
 

Nark

Macho Superpilot
It's a before takeoff item on windy days.

I'm not sure his situation, but I could see getting rushed and forgetting to pull it out.

It's not like a Cessna where it's right in plain view in front of you. It's a little out of sight.



Wiggins?
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
Don't know about the Otter, but every trainer I have flown has an extended metal placard that covers the mags and master, and is required to be removed to start the airplane.

On the King Air, the I guess you could say the pin is out of sight, but it is connected to a gate guard which restricts movement to the power levels, props and conditions.

Unless it is a personal checklist, I cant imagine any manufacturer actually publishing "keep gust lock in for taxi in windy conditions" for liability reasons.

I wouldn't highly discourage that practice to any of our new pilots reading this forums, who'm may have been told otherwise.
 

Nark

Macho Superpilot
It's a pet peeve of mine, but the DHC-3 is the Otter and the DHC-6 is the Twin Otter.
I digress...

The "Twotter" keeps the control locks in because of its huge control surfaces.

I'm sorry for your loss. This is something we can all learn from and apply to keep our flying safe.
 

Air Pirate

Well-Known Member
I've heard of this happening before too (can't remember if it was in an Otter or King Air). Fortunately, it turned out better as the pilot transitioned to elevator trim mode, got it off the ground, and then analyzed and corrected the problem.
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
If using the default beech control lock correctly, I cant see how this could be possible in a King Air.
 
It's a before takeoff item on windy days.

I'm not sure his situation, but I could see getting rushed and forgetting to pull it out.

It's not like a Cessna where it's right in plain view in front of you. It's a little out of sight.
+1 - I know a jumper pilot who did this... fortunately he was able to get the lock out once airborne.
 

vheissu

Well-Known Member
Sorry to hear about your loss. Are you talking about the Wiggen's crash? My company has "Control Locks-Removed" on the after start checklist. Most people I know, myself included, would have trouble taxiing the Twin Otter in strong wind with the locks installed and no correction in.
 
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