The Future of Air Traffic Controllers: Your Theory?

Rooster

New Member
I believe that the FAA's actions indicate that they do not care about the future of the controller workforce. I believe that they are deliberately trying to completely clear out the highly-paid previous generation of controllers with draconian work rules so that the new and politically-naive rookie majority in NATCA will vote to agree on a 5% pay raise (after the 30% cut) and the ability to wear jeans to work (that had been arbitrarilly revoked) in return for dropping all the complaints made by the previous generation of controllers and waiving their right to a negotiated contract. I also believe that they FAA won't reach this endgame because they didn't count on hemmoraging new hires as quickly as their retirees.

As the ratio of certified controllers to trainees gets worse and worse with retirements, there will inevitably be a breaking point where a crisis is declared and the case will be made before Congress that we just don't have enough trained controllers to work traffic and must fork over our airspace to the lowest bidder.

"Wouldn't management lose their jobs if air traffic control was privitized? Isn't this against their best interests?"

It isn't.

On September 10th 2008, the private, for-profit Raytheon Technical Services received a $437 million contract to provide training support for FAA air traffic controllers. Charlie Keegan is Raytheon's Program Manager. In 2006 Charlie Keegan resigned from his position of Vice President for Operation Planning at the FAA. Keegan, and others like him from FAA management, are maneuvering themselves into profitable positions away from the FAA before the upcoming fallout.

In short, I believe controllers are already headed toward privitization whether we like it or not, and that the people running those private companies will be the same people who are running the FAA now, only they will be much richer.

I don't see this playing out any other way.

Do you?
 

Shide

New Member
You just sent chills down my spine with that theory. I've spent the last 8 yrs. working for RTSC. To think that I may one day be a Raytheon employee again is frightening.
 

menglish1

Well-Known Member
I believe that the FAA's actions indicate that they do not care about the future of the controller workforce. I believe that they are deliberately trying to completely clear out the highly-paid previous generation of controllers with draconian work rules so that the new and politically-naive rookie majority in NATCA will vote to agree on a 5% pay raise (after the 30% cut) and the ability to wear jeans to work (that had been arbitrarilly revoked) in return for dropping all the complaints made by the previous generation of controllers and waiving their right to a negotiated contract. I also believe that they FAA won't reach this endgame because they didn't count on hemmoraging new hires as quickly as their retirees.

As the ratio of certified controllers to trainees gets worse and worse with retirements, there will inevitably be a breaking point where a crisis is declared and the case will be made before Congress that we just don't have enough trained controllers to work traffic and must fork over our airspace to the lowest bidder.

"Wouldn't management lose their jobs if air traffic control was privitized? Isn't this against their best interests?"

It isn't.

On September 10th 2008, the private, for-profit Raytheon Technical Services received a $437 million contract to provide training support for FAA air traffic controllers. Charlie Keegan is Raytheon's Program Manager. In 2006 Charlie Keegan resigned from his position of Vice President for Operation Planning at the FAA. Keegan, and others like him from FAA management, are maneuvering themselves into profitable positions away from the FAA before the upcoming fallout.

In short, I believe controllers are already headed toward privitization whether we like it or not, and that the people running those private companies will be the same people who are running the FAA now, only they will be much richer.

I don't see this playing out any other way.

Do you?


This isn't anything new the academy has been privitized for over 20 years by OU. I wouldn't say the sky is falling yet. Some people want to privitize ATC a lot more don't. Just like User fees I think someday it might happen but as long as lots of people stand up against it proponents will have an uphill battle. The thing going in our favor is that most congressman use the General Aviation system and arn't in favor of user fees only the airlines are really infavor. This is one more reason to really think about who you vote for this year.
 

MikeDelta

Well-Known Member
This isn't anything new the academy has been privitized for over 20 years by OU. I wouldn't say the sky is falling yet. Some people want to privitize ATC a lot more don't. Just like User fees I think someday it might happen but as long as lots of people stand up against it proponents will have an uphill battle. The thing going in our favor is that most congressman use the General Aviation system and arn't in favor of user fees only the airlines are really infavor. This is one more reason to really think about who you vote for this year.
I heard from a buddy of mine in OKC that OU lost the contract at he academy and Raytheon is taking it over. Just an fyi.
 

menglish1

Well-Known Member
Yeah this is true Raytheon got awarded the contract. The instructors are interviewing for their own jobs again. I'm sure they will all get it lol. Raytheon starts coming down in oct. as far as i've heard.
 

Yank&BankmyRJ145

New Member
Yeah this is true Raytheon got awarded the contract. The instructors are interviewing for their own jobs again. I'm sure they will all get it lol. Raytheon starts coming down in oct. as far as i've heard.
Anyone know the starting pay, I have a pilot leaving to instruct the Basics!
 

SkierMatt

New Member
Total privatization is the current objective.
even after the recent congressional hearing and the bill coming up based on safety and staffing going hand and hand?

Do you really think congress will pass it? (to privatize eventually)
seemed like congress had spoken in 2003, that this is one part where privatization would be a burden to national infrastructure, and security.
 

jeffm1999

New Member
I think they should privatize the hiring process..... :banghead:


But seriously, at the risk of sounding ignorant, what would the pros and cons of privitization really be? Better/Worse working conditions/pay? Safety of the NAS? etc...

Seems to me that most things would pretty much stay as they are, since lots of towers are currently privatized, but maybe someone with experience in both faa and contract towers can provide some comparison facts for us to digest.

Anyone?? :hiya:
 

Rooster

New Member
Do you really think congress will pass it? (to privatize eventually)
seemed like congress had spoken in 2003, that this is one part where privatization would be a burden to national infrastructure, and security.
I agree that as long as there is a choice, Congress will not allow Air Traffic Control to be privatized.

Unfortunately, it is choice that is being removed from the equation.

When there are too many rookies and too few veterans left to train them, the FAA will make the case that we have no choice but to privatize to keep the skies safe.

If the union tries to strike, the FAA will lobby to see them wiped out again so that America will have no choice but to privatize to refill the ranks of the nation's controllers.

What will Congress choose to do when this happens?

They won't have a choice.
 

ATC RET 2003

No More Vectors
I simply think that privatization of the is the aim of the current administration. I agree with those who have said that if McCain is elected, that it will remain the aim. I'm not so sure what direction it will take if Obama wins, but I'm also not so sure that there is any guarantee that privatization won't happen in that case.

I don't count on the current Congress for much of anything.

After 9/11 the privately-operated airport baggage screening process was federalized for reasons of national security. I thought then that the "inherently governmental" nature of the operation of the NAS would have been solidified for the same reason.

It wasn't.

I think the trend toward privatization will continue for a while. I DO hope it doesn't happen.
 
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