Stalls

sbav8r

New Member
I recently experienced something strange and wanted to know how common this is. Are you guys being taught stalls with turns of 20 and 30 degree banks? I met a PP that had never done one before. He came from a major acadamy and was terrified of stalling a plane in a turn. I thought everyone would have done this in training.
 

Eagle

New Member
I don;t recall if we did in pvt or not, EVERYONE should do it tho, interesting how much sooner you stall huh?

I *think* my wife did her first 30degree stall during her check ride for pvt...
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
My old instructor I had when I got my private had a fetish for doing turning stalls.

I teach them to my students using the scenario of getting too steep/slow on the various turns in the pattern- using the configuration, etc. that they would be in at those points (simulated at altitude, of course).

I've also flown with a few private pilots, doing BFR's, checkouts and such, who haven't experienced turning stalls. Not good since a stall would probably be more likely (or at least less noticibly eminent) in a turn in the pattern.
 

sbav8r

New Member
there's a lot of things that are not in the PTS, doesn't mean it shouldn't be taught. Besides I've never once had a check ride that the DPE asked for a straight and level stall. All were in turns.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Its not in the PTS

[/ QUOTE ]

Have you read through the PTS lately? Because it certainly is in there- take another look (under power on/power off stalls). The examiner can ask you do a stall in a turn on your private pilot checkride. Power on, or off.
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
I hadn't done a turning stall till the day before my checkride. My instructor heard the DPE I had likes to do power on stalls with 20 degrees of bank. So we went out and practiced a few. I struggled with it at first, but after a two of them, I got the hang of it. Sure enough, the next day, my DPE made me do one and I did fine.

And yeah, look a little harder in the PTS, it is in there.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
So much for the "major academy" having the best training.

I just looked at the PTS and you can be asked to do turning stalls, not to exceed 20 degree bank, both power on and power off.

Back in the day, we had to do accelerated stalls, too. Even though they aren't required anymore I think I'll still at least demonstrate it to pre-solo's. You would start it out like a steep turn, 45 degree bank, then pull the power to 1500 RPM and wait for it to stall. With the g loading in the turn, you would stall at a higher speed than with the wings level and sometimes the stall break was exciting.

Before my time, they even used to require spins for pre-solo.
 

sbav8r

New Member
Personally I think they still should require the spiin training. If you have never done do it. Not only is it a hoot, it may save your life someday.
 

Bluto

New Member
Not only are turning stalls required per the PTS, they are required prior to SOLO. 61.87 requires, among other things:

"(10) Stall entries from various flight attitudes and power combinations with recovery initiated at the first indication of a stall, and recovery from a full stall;"

Any instructor out there allowing a student to solo prior to teaching turning stalls is not only violating the FAR's, he is endangering his student. Please be smart out there CFI's. Learn the regs.
 

Ramsey

Well-Known Member
It is in the PTS and I had to do both power on and off stalls in each direction on my Private Check Ride.
 

Josh

Well-Known Member
I had the DPE ask me to do a standard rate turn, under the hood. Then asked me to slow it down to 60kts. Then asked me to show power off stall. After that, hood off, climb, and then 20deg right turn, then when I established, he asked for power on stall from there, said we were still cleared.

That was for PPL.

I don't recall doing stalls for the Instrument checkride (same DPE) but we did quite a bit of unusual attitude recovery. Which I think is kinda fun. After a couple, he was asking me how I though we were heading, without looking of course. I said climbing right, we were level right. And once said diving left, and we were level about 30deg right. Fun stuff, I think he had fun doing it since it is one of the few times he touches controls.
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Back in the day, we had to do accelerated stalls, too. Even though they aren't required anymore I think I'll still at least demonstrate it to pre-solo's. You would start it out like a steep turn, 45 degree bank, then pull the power to 1500 RPM and wait for it to stall. With the g loading in the turn, you would stall at a higher speed than with the wings level and sometimes the stall break was exciting.

[/ QUOTE ]

They are required for CFI's as well as cross controlled stalls. I think it's good to demonstrate both to a student pilot.
 

IrishSheepdog

Sitting in the median
We are required to at least demonstrate them to students. I normally demonstrated them at 30 degrees first, then later at 45 or 50 degrees (demonstrating stall in a steep turn). Lots of times the airplane will roll into the down wing, and the student gets an eye-opener to the effects of stalling in a turn like that. It is really a good thing to experience, and honestly very safe as long as it is done correctly and in a safe airplane.
 

aviator

New Member
I don't know about other "major academy's" but at FSI the standard is definently to teach turning stalls. Used to be 30 degrees for the power off and 20 for power on until the PTS changed recently to 20 degrees for both.
Unusual attitude recovery training also involves power on spin entry (left and right) with 5 turns a side. I found it to be a more realistic scenario for spins (base to final turn) and a faster entry than power off.
 

iceman21

Well-Known Member
No where in the PVT or Commerical PTS is spin entry mentioned. Training in spin awareness is required, but the only training that involves spin entry and recovery is the spin endorsement for the initial CFI.
 

Mahesh

New Member
At my flight school, the instructors didn't demonstrate or ask us to do turning stalls. However, during the stage checks, the Assistant chief flight instructors and the chief flight instructors did ask me to demonstrate both power on and power off turning stalls.

Of course, the chief flight instructor did make me do some very different things. For example, he brought down the power just a bit, and I ignored it because it wasn't too much and I thought that maybe he thought I had too much power in. Then a couple of minutes later, a little more. It finally dawned on me that I was slowly losing power. And it was a slow enough drop where I couldn't decide whether to head back to the airport which was 6 miles away or find a place to land on a field.

He did this because a couple of weeks before this flight, a Katana crashed killing the pilot when he was trying to return to the airport after losing partial power.

Mahesh
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
We practiced turning stalls for my PPSEL, but I did not have to do them during the practical.... and that was only in August of 2002.
 
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