Spin Entry procedures

EricH

New Member
I know how to recover from a spin. But im curious as to how one enters one, in, say a C-150. Anyone care to shed some light?
 

averyrm

Well-Known Member
In a decathalon or citabria the procedure is enter a stall normally, full rudder deflection and hold the stick back until desired number of turns have been done, then neutral stick and opposite rudder.

Never spun a 150, but I'd imagine it's similar.
 

Acadia

Well-Known Member
First off you if you plan on going to spin an aircraft you had better get proper training.

Without going through a whole lesson on spin aerodynamics here is how I do it mechanically speaking.

I slow the aircraft down to near stall speed (flaps up and power out). As I get close to a stall I tend to pull back on the yoke firmly so I get a good break. Just before or right as the stall breaks bury the left rudder (will go easier to the left i.e. so you are not fighting the small amount of engine torque). Off you go! Sometimes if I cant get a good stall break (cold days & light) then I keep some power in to get it to really roll over. 150's and 172's have pretty dull spin characteristics and you have to work a bit to get them to spin as compared to aerobatic planes, but I think that is a good thing

AGAIN! Don’t be doing this without training! Also don’t do it with just any aircraft as it can beat the hec out of the attitude indicator. Not good if its an IFR rental aircraft!
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
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But im curious as to how one enters one

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Well, in any aircraft- stall uncoordinated.

A 150/152 takes some work to get into one, a 172 is even harder to spin.
 

SkyyAngel

Well-Known Member
I was inches away from getting into a spin during a power-on stall.

It was my first time doing one and my CFI neglected to inform me I had to use the rudder. Just as we stalled the airplane took a sharp nose dive to the right and almost entered a spin.

Oh well...I guess that's how one learns.
 

PhilosopherPilot

Well-Known Member
I was doing spins just the other day in a Decathalon. I have some time from FlightSafety doing aerobatics in a Zlin, and I was expecting similar control forces...

So, as I put in my recovery inputs, I pushed forward further than necessary to recover, and by the time the rotation stopped I was pointing straight down. I recovered smoothly, but for a few seconds my heart rate was up! My new mantra...neutral elevator...neutral elevator!

That which does not kill us...

G
 

jtidmore

New Member
I am doing spin training in a Decathalon on Saturday for my spin enrdorsement. I am pretty excited about it.
 

pilatus028

New Member
I got my spin endorsement today in an Extra 300L. It was an amazing experience and I will be doing it again. The airplane is a fun toy....but only goes to show, you need proper training before even thinking about doing a spin.


Clem
 

PhilosopherPilot

Well-Known Member
It is my understanding that it is difficult to get into a normal spin in the 152/172, much less a flat spin. But with work and a little luck, maybe you can achieve your goals!

G
 

EDUC8-or

Well-Known Member
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It is my understanding that it is difficult to get into a normal spin in the 152/172, much less a flat spin. But with work and a little luck, maybe you can achieve your goals!


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I'm hoping that's luck of the bad sort.
 

Alchemy

Well-Known Member
C172's are tough to spin, especially to the right.

I usually set spins up like a power on stall (in cessnas and other aircraft that are difficult to spin). Once the stall is full developed, I kick in full left rudder making sure I continue to hold strong back pressure on the yoke while doing so. Going to the left allows you to use P-Factor, Spiraling Slipstream, and Torque to your advantage in entering the spin.

Once the plane is inverted, I reduce the power to idle and continue to hold full left rudder, full back pressure on the yoke, and left aileron input. These control inputs should keep you in the spin. Recover after 2 or 3 rotations by bringing the ailerons to neutral, applying rudder oppiste the direction of rotation, and pushing briskly forward on the yoke to break the stall.

You need to be sure to hold back pressure on the yoke the entire time or you'll just go into a high-airspeed, nose down, steep spiral.
 

Ophir

Well-Known Member
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Once the stall is full developed, I kick in full left rudder making sure I continue to hold strong back pressure on the yoke while doing so.

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That is the commonly taught procedure but have you ever moved the yoke forward while in the incipient part of the spin? If you do, one a normal empanaged plane, the spin will increase its spinning rate due to fact you will be masking part of the rudder with a full back stick/yoke. I bring this up because as Alchemy is saying here, keep the stick back while in the spin, especially until the spin has developed. If a person rushes forward with the stick to break the spin, it will mask a large portion of the rudder thus increasing the spin. That is one thing I don't like about PARE; it teachs using the elevator to break the spin. Just becareful with that one. It should be taught elevator neutral and momentarilty forward if spin will no break.
 
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