Something isnt right...

v1valarob

Well-Known Member
The picture below is actually pretty boring, but here is the story to go with it.

This was the weather yesterday at Dulles:

[FONT=Monospace,Courier]KIAD 141852Z 18004KT 3/4SM BR OVC004 12/12 A2989 RMK AO2 SFC VIS 4 SLP121 T01220117

So every time we would come into Dulles we were shooting an approach to just above minimums. The first 2 legs were IAD - CRW - IAD. We flew out to CRW just fine, but on the way back I noticed the red "VIB" flag on my altimeter. The altimeter would also stick by 500 feet. The captains altimeter which has a completly seperate system to mine would show us going through 2000' while mine would stick at 1500' and then come unstuck and quickly swing around to match up. When we finally leveled off, my altimeter was almost 125' off of the captains, and just as a joke I tapped on the glass face, but it actually began to correct itself by 10' every time I tapped on it. So I tapped until it was pretty close to correct.

My altimeter in the decent would always lag by about 100' so as we began our approach into Dulles my call outs were based on what I saw on the captains side, I decided not trust my instruments. We landed at Dulles and we were supposed to have a quick turn back out to MGW. However since the red flag was still up, he wrote up the altimeter and grounded the plane.

Fast forward to 2.5 hours later, we finally have a plane with a new altimeter. Finally its my leg, the Captain flew the first 2 legs and I was going to take the rest of the day. So we are cleared for take off, and as you do in the Saab, the captain controls the steering until 80kias when the first officer makes the "80 Knots" call out to verify we are both reading the same thing. At that time the captain either says "My controls" or "Your controls" this time he said my controls as it was my leg, and I took over the steering. The captain then called v1, Rotate, and off the ground we were.

In the Saab all of the autopilot is run off of the captains side. His side has an air data computer (ADC.) We also prefer to climb out at an airspeed instead of a vertical speed. So as we are climbing out, I keep hitting the vert sync button on my yoke. The speed at which the captains side airspeed indicator is indicating, will show up in the top right of the efis screen as you can see in the picture. As we climb out we are about 400' AGL and we are IMC and I hit the vert sync button, my side is showing around 140kias but when I hit the vert sync, 150kias shows up. I know that normally they are off by 2 or 3 knots, but never 10. So I click it again and its off by 15 knots. My airspeed begins to decrease down to 120, and I lower the nose to gain some speed. I then ask the captain what his side is showing and its reading 180kias, and the stand-by airspeed indicator is showing 180kias. We quickly realize my side is messed up, and the captain takes the controls. So we reorganize a bit, and I take over radios and he flys the plane. Pretty much just like you do in the sim, this is a fairly common problem they throw at you in the sim.

We call ops and they tell us to keep going to our destination. I was glad I brought my over night bag. However a few hours after we land we get an FAA ferry permit and bring the plane back to Dulles. It was very strange not having any of my normal instruments working during the whole flight. Sometimes at a split second I would forget mine were off, and would think something was wrong.

Anyway, here is the picture. We are climbing at 174kias going through 7000' for 8000'.




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amorris311

Well-Known Member
comon rob you have to check the pitot when you do the walk around. :) as ey would say, "it just wasnt your day to fly."
 

v1valarob

Well-Known Member
comon rob you have to check the pitot when you do the walk around. :) as ey would say, "it just wasnt your day to fly."

Ahhh, the famous line from ground school. "So Ed, what if both engines fail?" Ed: "Well you you run your memory items, but it just wasnt your day to fly."

Funny part was yesterday morning a certain jetcareers member passed this plane onto us and his IOE captain had already written up something. I mentioned to our F/A, "Its going to be one of those days."

Obviously MX screwed up something when they were connecting everything back up after replacing the altimeter. The pitot tubes, while rusty, were looking fine on the pre-flight, and post flight. ;)
 

amorris311

Well-Known Member
ahh its all good. i gotta say i miss ed. i enjoyed some of the good one liners. glad you got it all worked out though. it would not be fun to declare an emergency on a friday.
 

USMC-SSGT

Well-Known Member
Everyone told me that the Saab 340 was a dog in the climb. I never expected that 0 knots and 0 FPM though was what they meant.
 

amorris311

Well-Known Member
it isnt a rocketship ill tell you that. even in the cold weather at sealevel its nice to see 1500 to 1700 fpm. we had a guy from the q ride with us a few days ago and he laughed. sounds like that thing is a rocket.
 

USMC-SSGT

Well-Known Member
Eh the Q has its days. It is a bit odd though that climbing through 10K for example on a standard day you can climb at 250 kias and get around 1500 fpm in the climb or you can climb at 200-210 and get around 1500-1800 FPM in the climb. I noticed that a few months ago and wonder why would I want to climb at the same rate at 200 when I can do 250-260 and get the same rate of climb. If its light it should will do quite a bit better. For the dash guys who havent tried it give it a shot next time when you set IAS go for 240 and them after 8 bump it up to 250 and hold it and you will get the same rate as normal. We have the stupid flight safety "flaps zero, set IAS 200/210/220, climb check" burned into our heads. Why I did not try something other than 220 in the climb even up the the FLs for the first 6 months I have no idea.

Initial sea level climb in the plane on departure once it gets a full head of steam behind it can get over 3000 FPM but that will die off fairly quick into the low to mid 2's.
 

H46Bubba

Well-Known Member
Obviously MX screwed up something when they were connecting everything back up after replacing the altimeter. The pitot tubes, while rusty, were looking fine on the pre-flight, and post flight. ;)
Nice mx department ya got there!:rolleyes: Rusty tubes lead to particles getting into the lines which with water could clog the lines to your pitot system.
 

USMC-SSGT

Well-Known Member
Wow. Ive got more time inverted in a stearman than you have total time.



ok..i borrowed that one from a Colgan legend
 

v1valarob

Well-Known Member
it isnt a rocketship ill tell you that. even in the cold weather at sealevel its nice to see 1500 to 1700 fpm. we had a guy from the q ride with us a few days ago and he laughed. sounds like that thing is a rocket.

You wait till the summer. 150 will get you about 800fpm after 5k. Haha. Youll have to pull the torque back not to over temp it. Im amazed at how different the saab is during the cold temps.
 
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