SIC Type training

FL350

Well-Known Member
I am currently flying a Beech Premier jet and endorsing another pilot to get his SIC type on it. I realize where the type is officially needed, and I am rated with the single pilot type.

61.55 lists all the requirements for qualifying to get an six type. My question is regarding 61.55(h)(2):
"For the purpose of meeting the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section, a person may serve as second in command in that specific type aircraft, provided:

(1) The flight is conducted under day VFR or day IFR; and

(2) No person or property is carried on board the aircraft, other than necessary for conduct of the flight."

Does this mean that all their training must ONLY be conducted during the day? I hope I am misinterpreting something here, I'd want to give them some experience at night as well.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
I’d say “yes” for the initial training to complete the requirements of the SIC type. However, once you check those boxes, there’s notthung stopping you from getting the pilot some night experience. It’s redundant, but...welcome to FAA-think.

That being said, the Premier is a single-pilot aircraft and doesn’t require and SIC, as long as everything is working, right? So, unless something is deferred, 61.55 doesn’t exactly apply because an SIC isn’t required by certification or operation. Why the FAA hasn’t addressed such scenarios for SP aircraft is beyond me. The Citations 501/551 have been around since the late ‘70s.

Suggestion: do the ground in the morning. Do the required flight items about 4pm. Get dinner/paperwork and go back up for a few circuits after it’s dark.
 

FL350

Well-Known Member
I’d say “yes” for the initial training to complete the requirements of the SIC type. However, once you check those boxes, there’s notthung stopping you from getting the pilot some night experience. It’s redundant, but...welcome to FAA-think.

That being said, the Premier is a single-pilot aircraft and doesn’t require and SIC, as long as everything is working, right? So, unless something is deferred, 61.55 doesn’t exactly apply because an SIC isn’t required by certification or operation. Why the FAA hasn’t addressed such scenarios for SP aircraft is beyond me. The Citations 501/551 have been around since the late ‘70s.

Suggestion: do the ground in the morning. Do the required flight items about 4pm. Get dinner/paperwork and go back up for a few circuits after it’s dark.
thanks for the thoughts and idea. I had the same thoughts about the whole single pilot thing,but once again welcome to FAA-think.
Eventually he will be sent to school for a full PIC type.
 
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