ROTC Question

Wm226

New Member
Am I still able to join one of the ROTC programs and become a commissioned officer at ERAU if I spend one to two years getting credits at my local community college?

Thank You
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
Yeah, you can do a 2-year ROTC program.

It means you have to attend a 6-week field training program versus a 4-week program, but it's no big deal.

I am not sure how competitive it is to go that route. In 1990 when I went, my roommate got picked up for the six week field training program with no prior ROTC experience, but it was VERY competitive.

I would talk to the folks at ERAU's ROTC detachment (to let them know who you are, what you are doing, and to be keeping an eye out for you - it's never too early to network), and I would also talk to a local ROTC detachment in your area for more information about how to go about applying for it.

But it is possible.
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
Yeah, he did.

It's very competitive, and a 2-year guy is competing right alongside the 4-year guys for the same slots. This is why it is important to start networking with the ROTC cadre at ERAU as soon as you can.

Tuite was the one I was referring to. He got really lucky getting a pilot slot with his 6-week field training slot. I know guys who couldn't even get a missile slot a couple of years later.

It's all about the number of slots. If they can fill them with guys already in the program, it's harder for somone outside the program to come in and compete for them.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Yeah, he did.

It's very competitive, and a 2-year guy is competing right alongside the 4-year guys for the same slots. This is why it is important to start networking with the ROTC cadre at ERAU as soon as you can.

Tuite was the one I was referring to. He got really lucky getting a pilot slot with his 6-week field training slot. I know guys who couldn't even get a missile slot a couple of years later.



[/ QUOTE ]

I'm curious Copa, why did Tuite leave ROTC later? In fact, what ever happened to him?
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
I'm curious Copa, why did Tuite leave ROTC later? In fact, what ever happened to him?

[/ QUOTE ]

Now quite sure why he left. He only said he realized that the military wasn't for him. Not quite sure where he went; I think he is still in the Bay Area.

The advice for everyone: If you are lucky enough to land the slot, be sure you really want to go through with it. If you are not, drop out before you go so someone else who REALLY wants it can have that opportunity.

[ QUOTE ]
Did Chris have a sister named Rawand?

[/ QUOTE ]

Not that I am aware of.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
Rawand Tuite:
When I get "around to it" or "round tuit"
<not even worth a groan>
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Rawand Tuite:
When I get "around to it" or "round tuit"
<not even worth a groan>


[/ QUOTE ]

"A" for effort...
 
G

Guest

Guest
What If I go to riddle for 4 years and on my senior year I decide I don't want to join the military? Could I get the 4 year rotc scholarship at riddle if I wanted to join just the reserves or ang?
 

LostComm

Well-Known Member
It's been a few years since I was a cadet (or in the military for that matter!) But as I recall the local cadre of instructors have a small part to play in your eventual branch (that is, aviation, infantry, signal, etc.)

The input they generally provide on an "order of merit list" or OML. Your standing on the OML goes into your packet that gets sent to a centralized board that looks at 3 things:

Your score at Advanced Camp (used to based on a 1 to 5, now on a 1 to 1000 possible points),
Your GPA,
Your OML (and especially is you are a Distinguished Military Graduate or DMG)

Those things along with the needs of the Army THAT DAY (and they do change day to day) determine 1. your branch, and 2. your component (Regular, Reserve (active), Reserve (reserve))

You can get a GRFD contract-guaranteed reserve forces duty contract. You then are responsible for finding a unit, convincing them to accept you as a 2LT, and then you only spend your officer basic course time on active duty. Of course your packet would not go to the centralized board as you already would know your component and basic branch.

I was in the basic course with several GRFD guys. The Army was flexible about letting them miss a day or two to go interview for full time jobs, and one of them attempted, unsuccessfully, to change over to active duty.

I don't have that much reserve experience, yet I have found it rare for aviators to be straight reservists, and I have never seen a GRFD aviation officer.

Having said all of that, if you are honestly considering the military, when you are ready to pull the trigger (so to speak), here's an idea to make you very competitive on your camp score and OML: Go to basic training as a reservist now. ROTC will tell you that you can go to basic camp and get the same training-it's simply not true. Basic camp is a training environment, but the cadets aren't under any obligation, so a good deal of coddling goes on. Coddling you simply will not receive at advanced camp which is a TESTING environment. At basic training you will learn much more, and faster about the Army, and that will translate directly to a better score and OML. The mission of basic training is to teach warrior skills. These are the same skills that at advanced camp you'll be tested on.

A reserve unit near you needs help, no doubt about it. One thing I would change about they way I did things is to get an aviation MOS, which if you are interested in aviation will put you in a better position to get an aviation slot. Mechanic is better than crew chief, avionics tech might be as good as mechanic.

Just some thoughs...and I got out about 4 years ago so things may have changed. Good luck!

-D
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
What If I go to riddle for 4 years and on my senior year I decide I don't want to join the military?

[/ QUOTE ]

I am assuming you mean that if you join ROTC. You are committed at the start of your junior year. After that point, you belong to the Air Force. If you don't make it to graduation, you will either end up going enlisted or paying back any scholarship money you owe. Usually, as long as it wasn't an honors violation (cheating, breaking the law, etc), you will go enlisted, which is determined by the needs of the Air Force (and in this day and age, they generally will take anyone they can get). And if it is an honors violation, you usually get a dishonorable, bad conduct, or other than honorable discharge. So, if you are unsure, you better be sure by the start of your junior year (or earlier if you are thinking of accepting a scholarship; if you accept a scholarship, you are committed upon activation of the scholarship).

And I am pretty sure that the other services have similar rules.

[ QUOTE ]
Could I get the 4 year rotc scholarship at riddle if I wanted to join just the reserves or ang?

[/ QUOTE ]

The Army has programs for this; the Air Force does not. With Air Force ROTC, you will go active duty for 4 years. Then, you can go to the Reserves or ANG.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Thatnks for the responses. I still don't know if I really want to join the airforce. It is not an easy decision. Any tips?
 
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