Resume Question

triplec76

Well-Known Member
I have been looking around at a few sites that host resumes or give examples and was wondering what the norm was since I have seen many variations.

When submitting a resume to a regional or an FBO, what information should be on it? Anything other than experience relating to the field of interest? I saw some resumes that just had aviation experience on them, and others that listed their entire work history. Just wondering so I can start putting something together and keep it updated. Thanks in advance.
 

SkyyAngel

Well-Known Member
Personally I think entire work history (unless it somehow relates to job) is unnecessary and will just make the one doing the hiring that more likely to not want to read it.

Resumes should be short and concise. Sell yourself and your knowledge but they don't need to know you worked at McDonald's drive thru for 5 years and that's why you're good at radio communications....
 

fly22

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Personally I think entire work history (unless it somehow relates to job) is unnecessary and will just make the one doing the hiring that more likely to not want to read it.



[/ QUOTE ]


I diagree, if your a business owner or any job that show you are responsible and can handle leadership qualities will help. Ya po dunk jobs like Mc or BK different story.
 

PilotGuy37

New Member
IMO, on a resume' all you should state is any qualifications, training, work history that relates to the job applying for. Any thing else is what the application is for.
 

triplec76

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the responses. It makes sense to only list the qualifications for the position you are applying for, which is what I needed to know.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
I like to keep my resume at one page length. That means I don't put all of the silly non-aviation jobs that I've had. I've had nothing but success with the format. So far, all of the aviation employers that I've come in contact with could care less about the burgers I've flipped, the car stereos I've installed, the tables I've waited, and the people I've taught to ski.

If you want to add something about your experience from another job carrying over to aviation, its probably better to do that in the cover letter. One-page resumes are much preferred, in my humble experience.
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
I have a sample pilot resume that they give out here at ERAU. It's very helpful. I'll scan it and post it tonight.
 

aviator

New Member
Hmmm, according to that sample resume the guy got typed in an A-320 with around 400 hours. Gave that up and decided to instruct in singles......talk about taking a step backward!
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Dunno if I like that one... A reseume is supposed to point out your strengths and the fact that he wants 2 weeks notice is not a strength... plus on the app it usually says 'when can you start'. I'd use that space instead for one or more good references. Just MHO.
 

Flugmaschine

New Member
Yes, never a SSN on a resume. You never know where it's going to end up or who will be able to read it.

Regarding the 1-page rule, that's not so cast-in-stone. 2 pages is perfectly acceptable as long as you're able to grab the attention of the reader at the top of the first page. Don't list EVERYTHING you've ever done, but don't leave off skills, accomplishments or training which relate to the position you are applying for, even if it takes more than one page to do it. Also, white space is good on a resume. A cram-packed one-pager is not going to earn you any points if all it does is hurt the reader's eyes.

ESF mentioned that no one wanted to hear about the people he taught to ski. Really? Maybe so, if all one writes is "Taught people how to ski". That's a good, marketable skill, showing communication, empathy, human resourse management skills, etc. It all depends on how you word it.

Resumes should advertise your accomplishments, not just be a boring laundry list of old jobs.

Also, the link to Doug's resume doesn't seem to be working for me.
 

RiddlePilot

New Member
*shrugs* More than one way to skin a cat I'm sure. Keep in mind these folks have daily interaction with industry brass. I personally got this sample resume from a retired United A320 Captain, who coincidentally also did interviews.
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
A few resume tips:

The top 1/3 will be the most important.

Put a professional email on the resume (not HotSticks4Chicks@oolala.com for example)

Title At the top: Name, address, contact #, email is all you need. No SSNs, etc.

Use a Header, not an Objective, i.e. "Experienced Pilot and Flight Instructor" rather than "seeking a First Officer position with <your> airline." Please, resist the urge to do the suck up objective!

NEXT: Flight times! Make the TT bigger or in bold. It is the single most important thing on your resume (after your name).

List TT, Multi, Turbine, Jet, Instrument, Dual given. The rest is optional fluff.

Make sure you PUT A DATE on your flight times! "As of Feb 26, 2004:" You never know how long a resume is sitting around.

NEXT: List your certificates, medical and any type ratings. A lot of guys put their ATP written score but really, who cares?

NEXT: Employment History. Month/Year to Month/Year. Be concise as to your duties. Avoid fluff here too, like "was an energetic supervisor for a fast growing restaurant" and stick to things like "responsible for supervision, monthly accounting reports using QuickBooks 2002, taught Instrument students using FS2004, Elite AutoC, ATC-920 ..." and so on.

NEXT: (and this category is Optional) Awards and Honors, Professional Memberships (note: don't mention unions!)

Everything else is optional.

If you list REFERENCES then list them! NEVER use "Available on request."

And above all, KEEP IT TO ONE PAGE.
 

SkyyAngel

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]

I diagree, if your a business owner or any job that show you are responsible and can handle leadership qualities will help. Ya po dunk jobs like Mc or BK different story.

[/ QUOTE ]

Just like I said...what part did you disagree about?

I said that might pertain to the job....I also in my mind included jobs that would enhance the qualities they look for, such as leadership, etc. For example, I might include the fact that I've served as a Deputy Corps. Commander in AFJROTC in charge of over 100+ cadets and personally started a database that kept track of all their activites, grades, demerits, merits, etc throughout the year, and trained my replacement to do that job as well after I graduated.
 

Mike Lewis

Shadow Administrator
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]

I diagree, if your a business owner or any job that show you are responsible and can handle leadership qualities will help. Ya po dunk jobs like Mc or BK different story.

[/ QUOTE ]

Just like I said...what part did you disagree about?

I said that might pertain to the job....I also in my mind included jobs that would enhance the qualities they look for, such as leadership, etc. For example, I might include the fact that I've served as a Deputy Corps. Commander in AFJROTC in charge of over 100+ cadets and personally started a database that kept track of all their activites, grades, demerits, merits, etc throughout the year, and trained my replacement to do that job as well after I graduated.

[/ QUOTE ]

I don't know how old you are SkyyAngel, but you probably only want to keep things in there from no more than the past ten years. If you are 30 years old and one of your examples of leadership is from high school, it probably won't make any difference. Employers will want to know what you have done lately, so you will want to keep those examples as current as you can.
 
Top