PV-Beginning or the End

Vortmax

Well-Known Member
As I am 4 weeks to the day from my En-Route PV, I had a few thoughts and would like to initiate some feed-back. I have heard the term PV at least 5 times a day since I've been in Oklahoma City, which by the way is a long time. As we get closer, the term "PV" now comes up roughly 50 times a day. Now, obviously I understand the critical career consequences of the PV-TRUST ME, I KNOW! I just have to wonder if all the hype is necessary. All the hype just rattles your nerves and makes you crazy. Last week, 4 students out of 18 failed, but 3 passed the re-take. I do however get mixed messages regarding the PV-"They are looking for potential" is a common quote from instructors. Anyways, lots of stress and pressure. Think this is a sign of things to come-of course. But with all the employment threats and animosity, one cannot help but feel the need to line up a new gig-I know I have. You never know, right.
If you've taken the PV, or are feeling any of this-then by all means, chime in.
 

ABP52380

Well-Known Member
It's only natural for all of you to be putting great thought into the pv - after all, if you fail then it's game over. BUT, the FAA is pushing people through like crazy. Many of whom will not make it through the training process at their facilities. My initial group of 18 at OKC has had 1 person not make it past the pv, 2 people resign their position since reporting to their facility, 3 washout at their facility, and seveal others on the training bubble. Enroute is a long process. And for a reference point, we PV'd at the end of last June. (No off the streats, 14 CTI's and 4 military)

In terms of the PV, well, all I can say is try and do your best to be relaxed. By the time you run problems 33-36 you'll be above and beyond the level of problem on the PV. When I took mine (and there's 4 people testing at the same time), I heard strip holders dropping and banging off the table several times (once by me). That's just the nerves.

As for the test, and it's been a while, I can't remember a whole lot but here's a item or two:

Guy departs Jackson, climbing NE toward the MOA that is cold, his alt. is 170 -- RED FLAG! -- sure enough the MOA goes hot within a minute of the problem starting and that's a potential bust. (actually, one girl failed becasue of that item).

Couple guys on a collision course at Sidon (how did we spell that?)

Oh and you'll walk in and there will be an A** LOAD of strips in your bay. More than you'll have seen with any other problem. It's just a scare tactic. When you finish the problem most will still be in there with the majority no where near being on your screen.

Then the fun part! You report to your facility and draw maps for the next month! If you had any problems with aero center - hot dam son, wait till you get to draw your facility maps.
 

TripSix

Well-Known Member
Vortmax,

First and foremost, best of luck on your upcoming PV.

I slightly disagree with the statement "looking for potential,", and would instead replace it with "looking for trainability."

I don't know everyone who does PV's but I do know one, quite well, who does them on a regular basis. He's not looking for potential, he's looking for trainability. That is the function of OKC, not to make you an air traffic controller - but to ensure you are trainable when we get our hands on you in the field. By that, I mean you display the ability to absorb, process, and execute. In the field we can teach and fix what you are absorbing, processing, and executing - but the mental function itself isn't something we can pop open a book and read about or go over on a whiteboard.

In regards to your statement "All the hype just rattles your nerves and makes you crazy," and "anyways, a lot of pressure...."

Yes, it does. And, it should. That's the purpose, and it's a good one. Air traffic controllers possess nerves of steel, completely unflinching. It is not an option, it's a requirement. PV's touch on that as well - your ability to handle stress, work under stress, and bluntly - get the heck over it and do your job regardless.

If a supe conducting a PV on a machine that has a reset button just stresses someone out to the point where it inhibits their ability to do their job...well, that's something that needs to be taken into consideration as well.

Bottom line: don't sweat it. Pretend they aren't there, and do what you know how to do. Easier said than done, I know...especially the first couple of times. Focus on what you're doing, not on the fact they are watching you do it. Do not be afraid to make a mistake, as it's expected. Your reaction to that mistake has more bearing than the mistake itself.

Again, best of luck on your upcoming PV and best of luck in your new facility.





As I am 4 weeks to the day from my En-Route PV, I had a few thoughts and would like to initiate some feed-back. I have heard the term PV at least 5 times a day since I've been in Oklahoma City, which by the way is a long time. As we get closer, the term "PV" now comes up roughly 50 times a day. Now, obviously I understand the critical career consequences of the PV-TRUST ME, I KNOW! I just have to wonder if all the hype is necessary. All the hype just rattles your nerves and makes you crazy. Last week, 4 students out of 18 failed, but 3 passed the re-take. I do however get mixed messages regarding the PV-"They are looking for potential" is a common quote from instructors. Anyways, lots of stress and pressure. Think this is a sign of things to come-of course. But with all the employment threats and animosity, one cannot help but feel the need to line up a new gig-I know I have. You never know, right.
If you've taken the PV, or are feeling any of this-then by all means, chime in.
 
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