Preparation for CFI & CFII

Zero1Niner

Well-Known Member
I'm heading out of town at the end of October to do my CFI, CFII & MEI ratings. My plan is to study my butt off for the next 30 days to be as prepared as I can be when I get there.

I really want to make sure that I'm using my time wisely for the next 30 days, so I thought I would ask for suggestions on specifics of what I should really be focused on.

Plans are to read through the PHAK, AFH & AIH, as well as the Instrument Procedures Handbook and Instrument Flying Handbook. Thats a ton of reading, so I am trying to prioritize everything.

Any suggestions?
 

pacer7a

New Member
Sounds ambitious, good luck. I just did the CFI and am working on the CFII now.

Maybe this will help:

You didn't list the Flight Instructor Handbook. May as well commit all the FOI knowledge to memory. Oops, you have AIH there. But that will be high priority stuff.

You'll also need to get familiar with the endorsements. AC-61-65e has what you need there [faa.gov]: http://tinyurl.com/4b95pj
You need to know all the supporting FAR's from part 61 for the endorsements.

If you have a 2009 ASA FAR/AIM, there's a suggested study guide for each certificate/rating. The CFI study guide list is on page xiv. I found this to be really useful. I used it to review FAR's applicable to each before my practical with the FSDO.

Best of luck to you !
 

Zero1Niner

Well-Known Member
Sounds ambitious, good luck. I just did the CFI and am working on the CFII now.

Maybe this will help:

You didn't list the Flight Instructor Handbook. May as well commit all the FOI knowledge to memory. Oops, you have AIH there. But that will be high priority stuff.

You'll also need to get familiar with the endorsements. AC-61-65e has what you need there [faa.gov]: http://tinyurl.com/4b95pj
You need to know all the supporting FAR's from part 61 for the endorsements.

If you have a 2009 ASA FAR/AIM, there's a suggested study guide for each certificate/rating. The CFI study guide list is on page xiv. I found this to be really useful. I used it to review FAR's applicable to each before my practical with the FSDO.

Best of luck to you !
Ambitious indeed...or perhaps just insane. I need all the help I can get.

Thanks for the endorsement link. Greatly appreciate that.

I have the 2008 ASA FAR/AIM, and it has the study guides also. Thanks for that tip!

Great info! Thanks! What else you got?
 

flyingbuffalo

Well-Known Member
I would recommend starting your lesson plans. I'm doing the CFI right now and it is kind of one of those things that keeps getting in the way of studying and preparation. They are time consuming. Search online and find a skeleton layout for them or PM me and I can email you some of mine for examples. If anything tho, at least type out the objectives, completion standards, and common errors for now, they are all located in the PTS guides and the CFI PTS. Hope this helps, PM if you have any other questions.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
I would recommend starting your lesson plans. I'm doing the CFI right now and it is kind of one of those things that keeps getting in the way of studying and preparation. They are time consuming. Search online and find a skeleton layout for them or PM me and I can email you some of mine for examples. If anything tho, at least type out the objectives, completion standards, and common errors for now, they are all located in the PTS guides and the CFI PTS. Hope this helps, PM if you have any other questions.
No offense but I completely disagree with this

making my lesson plans was by far the best studying I did. The worst thing you could do for yourself is just find something on the internet, or someone other guys lesson plan.

I used the PTS as my framework and fleshed out each subject area. Doing that forced me to look everything up, thus I had read up on every subject area in the process. As well as it made it super easy to go right to the page in the book where I found the info later on.


Time consuming yes, but very good use of the time
 

Clocks

Well-Known Member
No offense but I completely disagree with this

making my lesson plans was by far the best studying I did. The worst thing you could do for yourself is just find something on the internet, or someone other guys lesson plan.

I used the PTS as my framework and fleshed out each subject area. Doing that forced me to look everything up, thus I had read up on every subject area in the process. As well as it made it super easy to go right to the page in the book where I found the info later on.


Time consuming yes, but very good use of the time
It sucked, but that's exactly what I did too. Helped immensely to identify the areas I was weak in. I walked into that process thinking I could type a lot of it from memory, and walked out of it humbled.
 

Jayrock

Well-Known Member
I took a break from my journey to becomming a CFI because it just seemed too overwhelming. It simply seemed like I had too much information--meaning too many books, videos, advice, etc.

Anway, so about a month or so ago and I decide to get my act together. I decided to do what many here on JC say over and over--start with the PTS. It really does tell you what the feds are looking for. For example I got current on all of the publications that were listed, printed out the ACs and placed them in binders, etc. Took all my Jepp books and placed them in a secondary reference pile.

Right now I am actually revisting my lesson plans and syllabus. My originals were a few years old and they seemed pretty weaksauce. I am actually glad I'm redoiong them. It really is refreshing having to recreate the lessons and revisit the maneuvers. After that is done I'll tackle the book-smarts, namely the AIH.

I think you get the idea. Sorry, if I turned this into a "me" thread.

Good luck!
 

JustinA

Well-Known Member
I went through the entire PTS and made a flashcard for everything. It will take a while to do this but I knew every single question ask during my CFI checkride. Good luck!
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
Be sure to do lesson plans (or research papers if you want to call them that) on each of the Special Emphasis Areas, as well do the same for all of the Tasks. Make sure you really focus on the research. You can find all of the info needed in the references given in the PTS.

As far as the maneuvers, copy from the AFH and use their illustrations, verbatim descriptions, and common errors.

You don't need to do all of this. But you probably should if you expect to be prepared for the checkride.

We all wish you BEST of luck! Its a great learning experience....then the real learning experience begins:panic:.
 

etflies

Keeping calm, Chiving on.
For the lesson plans, make them yourself, don't find someone else's or an outline online. I agree with bdhill, making them myself was by far one of the better study tools I had. I'd get the Gleim Flight Instructor Flight Maneuvers and Gleim Instrument Flight Maneuvers books for your lesson plans. They cover all of the PTS subjects and then some, and are a great tool for your lesson plans.

Beyond that, the OEG and PTS will be big helps as well.
 

flyingbuffalo

Well-Known Member
No offense but I completely disagree with this

making my lesson plans was by far the best studying I did. The worst thing you could do for yourself is just find something on the internet, or someone other guys lesson plan.


I think you misunderstood what i meant. I said to find a skeleton (layout) of a lesson plan(s) to see what they are composed of and then make your own filling in the needed information. If you have no idea what a lesson plan looks like how are you going to make one? I was given many different examples of lesson plans in my training and kind of took pieces from them all to make a skelton for my plans and then filled in all of the information I thought was needed to be taught for each lesson. In no way was I saying to cut and paste lesson plans from the internet, you would only be hurting yourself anf future students. Making your lesson plans is a great study aid and help you refresh on everything you have been taught.
 

sdfcvoh

This is my Custom Title
.....to find a skeleton (layout) of a lesson plan(s) to see what they are composed of and then make your own filling in the needed information. If you have no idea what a lesson plan looks like how are you going to make one?

PLEASE don't take this wrong... but the FOI covers that completely. Now, I understand that it is vague. I've seen lesson plans that are one page and list the basics.. as covered in the FOI. That is great if you have been a CFI for years upon years and the mere mention of Vestibular Illusions gives you a wicked chum.:D

You'll want to follow the generic outline that the FOI outlines for your first page. But after that, you are really going to need to get a dozen pages of diagrams, charts, detailed explanations, etc. etc. The research is going to be what gets you prepared for the CFI oral. I can't stress that enough. I know this sounds like a broken record, but seriously, the research and documentation you print out and organize for yourself before the CFI is worth its weight in gold. Think of it as something you are doing for your future students....not yourself.

I hope this helps. PM me and I will be glad to send you some of the stuff I prepared in PDF format.
 

bdhill1979

Gone West
I think you misunderstood what i meant. I said to find a skeleton (layout) of a lesson plan(s) to see what they are composed of and then make your own filling in the needed information. If you have no idea what a lesson plan looks like how are you going to make one? I was given many different examples of lesson plans in my training and kind of took pieces from them all to make a skelton for my plans and then filled in all of the information I thought was needed to be taught for each lesson. In no way was I saying to cut and paste lesson plans from the internet, you would only be hurting yourself anf future students. Making your lesson plans is a great study aid and help you refresh on everything you have been taught.
sorry

Note to self, no posting on the innuhnets until after the coffee is brewed.

mmmm coffee
 
Top