Pilot Deviation Report

3enginejock

Well-Known Member
Im flying out of riverside a lot. I go to ATP, working on my commercial. Today, while flying from Sacramento to Riverside, we were assigned 2000 feet and a hdg on departure with vectors to a frogo transition then as filed. I was the safety pilot and my partner was the PIC for this leg. We were on a IFR flight plan and we are both private pilots with instrument ratings.

Well we took and got switched to departure, so I make the call and he says "rogers 41b traffic 10 o clock C130 climbinb out of 1000, report in sight"...

So I start looking for this traffic. Meanwhile, were climbing past 2000 feet, before I look back were already at 2500, 500 feet above our assigned altitude. So I tell the pilot to get down quickly we are over our assigned altitude.

Two seconds later the controllers comes on and this is what happens:

Controller: 41B what was your assigned altitude.
Me: 2000 41B.
Controller: Descend and maintain 2000, advise when ready to copy a number I need you to call when you land.
Me: Ready to copy....

I then copied down the number.

Pretty much when we landed the pilot called the number and they told him they had filed a "Pilot Deviation Report" with the Sacramento FSDO and that they should be in touch. He then asked for all of his information. Address/Phone/Pilot Certificate etc.

Im just wondering if any of this can come back on me. I was just a Safety Pilot for that leg, covering Radios, Navigation, and watching for Traffic.

Pretty much everyone ive talked to said it was pretty lame for the controller to do that for just a quick 500 ft over altitude. We were literally there for a split second before the pilot descended back down to 2000. Though he might have kept on climbing had I not warned him lol.
 
Pretty much everyone ive talked to said it was pretty lame for the controller to do that for just a quick 500 ft over altitude. We were literally there for a split second before the pilot descended back down to 2000. Though he might have kept on climbing had I not warned him lol.
First it could have been a supervisor working the sector. Second, under the present FAA if anyone in management was watching the scope or at a later date pulled the tapes and reviewed the session the controller could have gotten into serious trouble for not reporting the event.

The PIC is the only one who should get caught up in this. I'm not familiar with FSDO procedures so that is just an educated guess.

If you're a member of AOPA I think they provide a service you can call where you can get more info, the pilots on here should have more info on this.
 

triple7

Well-Known Member
Is this something that would stay on someones record that airlines could see?
If administrative action is taken yes they will see it. It will be on your FAA record. And you will have to check the box that says have you ever had any violations or accidents.

Did you file a NASA form? I would do that ASAP. Also, You might want to check with AOPA to make sure they cant offer you some advice. Dont admit to anything except on that NASA form,.
 

3green

Well-Known Member
Fill out a NASA form just in case and contact an aviation attorney if you can afford it. From a 121 perspective, in DFW controllers were told to report any deviations in altitude and instructions due to a large number they were having with A/C arriving/departing that area. It was routine for them to actually NOT say anything to a crew and report the deviation. Only way they knew they had been violated was they got called into the CP's office. Sorry for detracting from the main post, just thought it would be good info for anybody out there.

You might want to tell the PIC to do the same thing and fill out a NASA form too. Good luck.
 

AlWaYs HiGh

Well-Known Member
The guy flying will most likely be getting a "Warning Letter" on his record. The good thing is that it only stays on your pilot record for 2 years, and then it is gone forever. I would say your in the clear unless when the FAA contacts him he tells them you were the safety pilot and gives them your info (because they will ask for it). For all they know at this point he was the only one on board the flight.
 

zmiller4

Well-Known Member
I would say your in the clear unless when the FAA contacts him he tells them you were the safety pilot and gives them your info (because they will ask for it). For all they know at this point he was the only one on board the flight.
Knowing some of the folks there, I think it's highly likely that the Sacramento FSDO knows that there was a safety pilot on board (there's a reason ATP doesn't do any checkrides with them--they don't get along well with ATP). I would fill out a NASA form immediately. I'm pretty sure they can (and will) ding you as well, since they probably know you were logging PIC for the flight.
 

Sidious

Well-Known Member
Curious - Did you guys decide before the flight that you would be acting PIC? Where you logging PIC as the safety pilot?

If so then I would say you might have something coming your way since you were responsible for the flight.
 

falconvalley

Absentee Dad of the OOTSK, Runner, Cat Frustrator
Like the others said, get that NASA form filled out. Encourage the PIC of that flight to do one, also. You did your job as a safety pilot. You scanned for traffic while the PIC flew. The PIC, unfortunately didn't do their job of flying the airplane. An understanding Inspector would recognize this and probably scold you for not being more careful and leave it at that.

An Inspector who isn't as understanding might find you more responsible for the deviation than you should be. You're a licensed pilot and you are qualified as a PIC for that kind of flying, so you know the deal. You are not an instructor, however and can't be expected to be on top of everything, but practice vigilance from now on. At any rate, the NASA form will help you tremendously.
 

zmiller4

Well-Known Member
An Inspector who isn't as understanding...
Those don't exist!

The major problem I see is with the dual logging of PIC. It gets you cheaper flight time, but this is one situation where I can *really* see it coming back to bite you in the ass.
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
Pretty much everyone ive talked to said it was pretty lame for the controller to do that for just a quick 500 ft over altitude. We were literally there for a split second before the pilot descended back down to 2000. Though he might have kept on climbing had I not warned him lol.
If it even came close to causing a loss of separation, its the controller's ass if he doesn't report it. 500 feet has you mingling with VFR traffic too, most of which isn't going to be talking to ATC.
 

BajtheJino

I'm looking at you.
If administrative action is taken yes they will see it. It will be on your FAA record. And you will have to check the box that says have you ever had any violations or accidents.
I had an administrative action some years ago. It does not show on your record and after two years it goes away-unless you do something else. Mine is gone and has never showed up on a PRIA search.
 

3enginejock

Well-Known Member
I filed the NASA report, as did the other pilot. Hopefully it all works out. Ive actually used this as a learning experiance and im now constantly watching the gauges even when im not flying.
 
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