Part 135 help

Ishmael

New Member
Hello,

I'm wondering how we get a 135.293A1,4-8 check done. I do the other parts of 135.293 checks when I do the sim training and a 299 ride yearly. But how do we get the above check completed. New to this stuff.

Thanks
 

SpiceWeasel

Tre Kronor
Hello,

I'm wondering how we get a 135.293A1,4-8 check done. I do the other parts of 135.293 checks when I do the sim training and a 299 ride yearly. But how do we get the above check completed. New to this stuff.

Thanks
135.293(a)(2-3)(b) is the aircraft specific systems and weight and balance oral (a2-a3) and sim (b), I believe, 297 is the IPC, and the 299 is the PIC check.

(a)(1)(4-8) Are usually part of the company specific training. The company you work for should provide indoc, hazmat, rvsm, etc. etc. # of courses that satisfies their FAA-approved training curriculum. Once you've taken each module you are tested on each module (and potentially given a certificate of completion or a checkmark or something). The operator may give a "big quiz" or consider the testing for each module sufficient then to sign off the (a)(1)(4-8). It varies with company-specific FAA-approvals.

FAR §135.293 said:
Initial and recurrent pilot testing requirements.

(a) No certificate holder may use a pilot, nor may any person serve as a pilot, unless, since the beginning of the 12th calendar month before that service, that pilot has passed a written or oral test, given by the Administrator or an authorized check pilot, on that pilot's knowledge in the following areas—
(1) The appropriate provisions of parts 61, 91, and 135 of this chapter and the operations specifications and the manual of the certificate holder;
(2) For each type of aircraft to be flown by the pilot, the aircraft powerplant, major components and systems, major appliances, performance and operating limitations, standard and emergency operating procedures, and the contents of the approved Aircraft Flight Manual or equivalent, as applicable;
(3) For each type of aircraft to be flown by the pilot, the method of determining compliance with weight and balance limitations for takeoff, landing and en route operations;

(4) Navigation and use of air navigation aids appropriate to the operation or pilot authorization, including, when applicable, instrument approach facilities and procedures;
(5) Air traffic control procedures, including IFR procedures when applicable;
(6) Meteorology in general, including the principles of frontal systems, icing, fog, thunderstorms, and windshear, and, if appropriate for the operation of the certificate holder, high altitude weather;
(7) Procedures for—
(i) Recognizing and avoiding severe weather situations;
(ii) Escaping from severe weather situations, in case of inadvertent encounters, including low-altitude windshear (except that rotorcraft pilots are not required to be tested on escaping from low-altitude windshear); and
(iii) Operating in or near thunderstorms (including best penetrating altitudes), turbulent air (including clear air turbulence), icing, hail, and other potentially hazardous meteorological conditions; and
(8) New equipment, procedures, or techniques, as appropriate


(b) No certificate holder may use a pilot, nor may any person serve as a pilot, in any aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 12th calendar month before that service, that pilot has passed a competency check given by the Administrator or an authorized check pilot in that class of aircraft, if single-engine airplane other than turbojet, or that type of aircraft, if helicopter, multiengine airplane, or turbojet airplane, to determine the pilot's competence in practical skills and techniques in that aircraft or class of aircraft. The extent of the competency check shall be determined by the Administrator or authorized check pilot conducting the competency check. The competency check may include any of the maneuvers and procedures currently required for the original issuance of the particular pilot certificate required for the operations authorized and appropriate to the category, class and type of aircraft involved. For the purposes of this paragraph, type, as to an airplane, means any one of a group of airplanes determined by the Administrator to have a similar means of propulsion, the same manufacturer, and no significantly different handling or flight characteristics. For the purposes of this paragraph, type, as to a helicopter, means a basic make and model.
 

BajtheJino

I'm looking at you.
Seems to me that 135.297 is saying that in order to pass this, you have to meet the standards of .293 and that if doing so you meet all the standards.
 

SpiceWeasel

Tre Kronor
Seems to me that 135.297 is saying that in order to pass this, you have to meet the standards of .293 and that if doing so you meet all the standards.
That is correct.... if you are getting a 297, you are also concurrently getting a 293(a2,a3)(b). You cannot "only" get a 297. When we sent in our Captains for their 299s, they also got the 293 and 297 but we didn't "reset" their base month.
 

Joepilot84

Foxtrot Tango Whiskey
Is the 293 transferable? I am currently 293 297 and 299 current and qualified under scheduled 135, but was offered a job at another company flying Hawker 700/850XP's. They do their training at simuflight in Dallas, and the 293 oral with the POI, problem is coordinating it. Would my 293 from current company, which is good until august of next year, qualify at the other company?
 

Joepilot84

Foxtrot Tango Whiskey
Im not saying the new company would go for this, I am posing the question purely as an academic curiosity.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
No a 293 is company specific as far as I know. It is a 297 that I believe to be universally good. But I have had alcohol so who the F knows...
In the past they have all been universally transferable. You're local fiefdom make vary wildly, and the prince(poi) overseeing your operation may disagree with the FFA, the chief counsel's office and even the local fiefdom... so..... who the F knows.
 

Patrick

Well-Known Member
Is the 293 transferable? I am currently 293 297 and 299 current and qualified under scheduled 135, but was offered a job at another company flying Hawker 700/850XP's. They do their training at simuflight in Dallas, and the 293 oral with the POI, problem is coordinating it. Would my 293 from current company, which is good until august of next year, qualify at the other company?
Not anymore. This used to be OK, but now it must be company specific.
 

Boyington

Well-Known Member
Correct me if I am wrong, but if you change companies, you need to complete an approved indoc (with CIDA/Hazmat/etc...) with written tests, and then pass all checkrides again.
 

Joepilot84

Foxtrot Tango Whiskey
Already did the indoc training and written tests while still working at the old company (1 week vacation). Just need to do the non aircraft specific portions of the 293, which they have the POI do, and then the rest of the 293 and the 297 which is done at Simulflight along with the type rating course.
 
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