MD-88 emergency landing KGSP

ATL_IT_Pilot

Well-Known Member
Wow...I was suppose to be on that flight, but was late getting to the airport and ended up on the 5:20 flight out.
 

Derg

New Arizona, Il Duce/Warlord
Staff member
FO4EVER, how COULD you, man? Where's the fighting spirit? :) :sarcasm:
 

Orange Anchor

New Member
Doesn't sound too eventfull. Smoke in the cockpit, and apparently blew a tire on landing. Flight was coming from Dulles, heading to Atlanta.
http://www.wyff4.com/news/18258128/detail.html
Considering the past episodes (Air Canada, SwissAir FedEx, ValuJet), ALL smoke in the cabin/cockpit should be treated as a potentially catastrophic event. In some cases, there has been less than 10 minutes from initial sensing to the end.

The problems are myriad. You often can't really find the source. You often can't get at the source and even if you can, most do not have any real equipment to deal with the smoke source. NOT something to take lightly.
 

SafetyEngineer

New Member
:banghead: 1 out of 3. But you have three fatal incidents listed! :sarcasm:

Again, in as many days, and with all due respect. Another instance where we can see a wide reaction to an incident from experienced pilots. I understand all too well keeping a schedule and meeting FAA times, but 145 passengers is a lot of lives to gamble on.

As always, be safe. :rawk:
<TABLE><TBODY><TR><TD class=caption>
Added From:
AVIATION-SAFETY.NET

Date:
</TD><TD class=caption>



11-DEC-2008
</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Time:</TD><TD class=desc>ca 16:30</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Type:</TD><TD class=desc>McDonnell Douglas MD-88</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Operator:</TD><TD class=desc>Delta Air Lines</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Registration:</TD><TD class=desc></TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>C/n / msn:</TD><TD class=desc></TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Fatalities:</TD><TD class=desc>Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 145</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Airplane damage:</TD><TD class=desc>Minor</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Location:</TD><TD class=desc>Greenville-Spartanburg Airport (GSP) -
United States of America </TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Phase:</TD><TD class=desc>En route</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Nature:</TD><TD class=desc>Domestic Scheduled Passenger</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption>Departure airport:</TD><TD class=desc>IAD</TD></TR><TR><TD class=caption><NOBR>Destination airport:</NOBR></TD><TD class=desc>ATL</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Narrative:
"The crew reported a smoky odor in the cockpit (...) As a precaution, the crew chose to divert to the Greenville-Spartanburg airport." After landing at GSP, "the aircraft was immobilized on a taxiway due to blown tires". (DL1102)
 

Orange Anchor

New Member
1 out of 3. But you have three fatal incidents listed! :sarcasm:

Again, in as many days, and with all due respect. Another instance where we can see a wide reaction to an incident from experienced pilots. I understand all too well keeping a schedule and meeting FAA times, but 145 passengers is a lot of lives to gamble on.

As always, be safe


Not sure for the sarcasm but if one goes to the NTSB website and clicks on aviation, search for smoke and fumes , you will find it occurs far more frequently that many suppose.

Incidents
UPS DC-8 PHL 2006
http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Concourse/7349/270fire.html

The situation of fire in the cockpit/cabin is generally poorly addressed. Many operators (including my 'old house') would have a cut 55gal barrel filled w oily material and have crews/FAs put that fire out. NOT likely in a real incident that the fire will be easily accessed and the ability to put the nozzle near the fire.

Also, since the fire will produce irritating particles and fumes, there is a strong likelihood that eyesight will be effected UNLESS one is wearing a full face mask. Goggles have shown to be only modestly effective. And then for those with glasses, there is that issue.

For my airplane (now retired) I know I need (worse case-contaminated runway) x ft to land and get stopped at max weight. Smoke and fumes and I am headed to the nearest runway that meets that requirement. We can sort things out on the ground.

Like an old friend said when we were in SE Asia a long time ago.. "Only three things really scare me.. big thunderstorms, fires and crazy drunk women... all can kill you in a matter of minutes." (different time and misogyny not intended)

And yes, fly safe....
 
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