Maneuver Question

tgrayson

New Member
Reference?
§ 23.3 Airplane categories.
(a) The normal category is limited to
airplanes that have a seating configuration,
excluding pilot seats, of nine or
less, a maximum certificated takeoff
weight of 12,500 pounds or less, and intended
for nonacrobatic operation.
Nonacrobatic operation includes:
(1) Any maneuver incident to normal
flying;
(2) Stalls (except whip stalls); and
(3) Lazy eights, chandelles, and steep
turns, in which the angle of bank is not
more than 60 degrees.
(b) The utility category is limited to
airplanes that have a seating configuration,
excluding pilot seats, of nine or
less, a maximum certificated takeoff
weight of 12,500 pounds or less, and intended
for limited acrobatic operation.
Airplanes certificated in the utility
category may be used in any of the operations
covered under paragraph (a) of
this section and in limited acrobatic
operations. Limited acrobatic operation
includes:
(1) Spins (if approved for the particular
type of airplane); and
(2) Lazy eights, chandelles, and steep
turns, or similar maneuvers, in which
the angle of bank is more than 60 degrees
but not more than 90 degrees.

(c) The acrobatic category is limited
to airplanes that have a seating configuration,
excluding pilot seats, of
nine or less, a maximum certificated
takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds or less,
and intended for use without restrictions,
other than those shown to be
necessary as a result of required flight
tests.
 

qflyer

Well-Known Member
(b) The utility category is limited to
airplanes that have a seating configuration,
excluding pilot seats, of nine or
less, a maximum certificated takeoff
weight of 12,500 pounds or less, and intended
for limited acrobatic operation.
Airplanes certificated in the utility
category may be used in any of the operations
covered under paragraph (a) of
this section and in limited acrobatic
operations. Limited acrobatic operation
includes:
(1) Spins (if approved for the particular
type of airplane); and
(2) Lazy eights, chandelles, and steep
turns, or similar maneuvers, in which
the angle of bank is more than 60 degrees
but not more than 90 degrees.
Thanks!
 

mhcasey

Well-Known Member
But you're supposed to have chutes >60 degrees regardless of aircraft category, correct?
 

tgrayson

New Member
But you're supposed to have chutes >60 degrees regardless of aircraft category, correct?

Sec. 91.307 Parachutes and parachuting.
</pre>...


(c) Unless each occupant of the aircraft is wearing an approved
parachute, no pilot of a civil aircraft carrying any person (other than
a crewmember
) may execute any intentional maneuver that exceeds--
(1) A bank of 60 degrees relative to the horizon; or
(2) A nose-up or nose-down attitude of 30 degrees relative to the
horizon.
</pre>...
 

troopernflight

Well-Known Member
Thanks Tgrayson. I have a friend who demonstrated the maneuver the other day in a DA20. It seemed like a pretty tame maneuver if done correctly, but I just wanted to make sure I wasn't getting myself into something dangerous. I guess I should trust him considering he's was an acrobatic instructor years ago (now an airline pilot).
 

tgrayson

New Member
I just wanted to make sure I wasn't getting myself into something dangerous.
Only issue is you weren't a crewmember, so you should have been wearing parachutes if he banked more than 60. Again, that doesn't necessarily mean it was dangerous, but banks of more than about 75 degrees can rapidly create excessive load factors.
 
Top