Logging XC time

saxman

Well-Known Member
I use to have an aerial survey job flying several hours at a time all in the same area. When I needed to stop for fuel/lunch I'd land at whatever airport was nearest other than my departure point fill up there. Then takeoff and fly another few hours and return to the base. Technically these are XC flights because i went somewhere else. But do you think airlines or furture employers would wonder about a 6.6 hour XC flight to an airport thats only 30 or 60 miles away?

Plus it doesn't matter about the 50 NM mile rule for XC's because I'm just building time for my ATP now.
 

tgrayson

New Member
Plus it doesn't matter about the 50 NM mile rule for XC's because I'm just building time for my ATP now.
The ATP also requires the 50+ nm. The only difference is that a landing is not required.

Other than that, the time is legit, so log it. If someone questions it, explain it to them.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
I use to have an aerial survey job flying several hours at a time all in the same area. When I needed to stop for fuel/lunch I'd land at whatever airport was nearest other than my departure point fill up there. Then takeoff and fly another few hours and return to the base. Technically these are XC flights because i went somewhere else. But do you think airlines or furture employers would wonder about a 6.6 hour XC flight to an airport thats only 30 or 60 miles away?

Plus it doesn't matter about the 50 NM mile rule for XC's because I'm just building time for my ATP now.
First, let's get the rule correct.

If you are building time toward your ATP, the cross countries that count are those in which you go more than 50 NM from where you started, although, unlike the others, you do not have to land.

==============================
61.1(b)(3) Cross-country time means -

(vi) For the purpose of meeting the aeronautical experience requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate (except with a rotorcraft category rating), time acquired during a flight -
(A) Conducted in an appropriate aircraft;
(B) That is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and
(C) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems.
==============================

Your question suggests that these airports where you are landing are not >50 NM from the point of origin, so they are not cross countries countable for ATP purposes. The =are= however countable toward Part 135 cross country requirements, which use the 61.1(b)(3)(i) definition.

In terms of the 6 hour flight for an airport 30 NM away, I can't imagine they'd look poorly on it if you logbook indicated that it was aerial surveying. But perhaps someone else with more industry knowledge can answer that.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
why would it be viewed poorly?? you guys are waaaay too negative.

the spirit/concept i interpret of "cross country" is managing the tasks required to navigate, communicate, and aviate to an airport that is different from where you started (as opposed to flight time in a local area then zipping back in to land.)

now, suppose you were working and spent 5 hours shooting imagery, and then navigated, communicated, and aviated to an airport you didnt start at... you still used the required and SAME aeronautical skills as you would have if you just went directly there. you just did it ONE BETTER and managed to do some work and get paid for it on the way there!!

if you went crosscountry, you went crosscountry. its not "cheating" somehow because you got PAID to do work along the way.

log it, you earned it.
 

DPApilot

GUYSH! GUYSH! GUYSH!
why would it be viewed poorly?? you guys are waaaay too negative.

the spirit/concept i interpret of "cross country" is managing the tasks required to navigate, communicate, and aviate to an airport that is different from where you started (as opposed to flight time in a local area then zipping back in to land.)

now, suppose you were working and spent 5 hours shooting imagery, and then navigated, communicated, and aviated to an airport you didnt start at... you still used the required and SAME aeronautical skills as you would have if you just went directly there. you just did it ONE BETTER and managed to do some work and get paid for it on the way there!!

if you went crosscountry, you went crosscountry. its not "cheating" somehow because you got PAID to do work along the way.

log it, you earned it.

Def!

log anything youve earned, why waste it?
 

Scandinavian13

New Member
I know of a bunch of guys in Pensacola, FL who towed banners all day, flew over the field, dropped the banner and headed off for an airport 50nm away to log all of the time.

I have a feeling it's done more than you think.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
now, suppose you were working and spent 5 hours shooting imagery, and then navigated, communicated, and aviated to an airport you didnt start at... you still used the required and SAME aeronautical skills as you would have if you just went directly there. you just did it ONE BETTER and managed to do some work and get paid for it on the way there!!
I think you did even better than that. Doing surveying, you probably did low-level maneuvering flight - ground reference maneuvers and slow flight - and showed a superior skill set.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
I think you did even better than that. Doing surveying, you probably did low-level maneuvering flight - ground reference maneuvers and slow flight - and showed a superior skill set.
well with my surveying company, its mid altitude, but tracking courses +- .024NM .... which definitely shows some sort of skill set...

take credit for what you do, guys and gals.
 
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