Logging xc time for ATP and 135

GuitarMan

New Member
Looking for any previous discussion about logging xc time for ATP certificate and 135 requirement;

Does it have to be more than 50 nm or none; I heard so many different explanations about it.

Thanks
 

TDoc

Well-Known Member
ATP yes, 50nm.

(3) Cross-country time means—
(i) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(3)(ii) through (b)(3)(vi) of this section, time acquired during flight—
(A) Conducted by a person who holds a pilot certificate;
(B) Conducted in an aircraft;
(C) That includes a landing at a point other than the point of departure; and
(D) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems to navigate to the landing point.

Skipping ahead to sub paragraph (vi), we see that it spells it out pretty clearly.
(vi) For the purpose of meeting the aeronautical experience requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate (except with a rotorcraft category rating), time acquired during a flight—
(A) Conducted in an appropriate aircraft;
(B) That is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and
(C) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems.



And the 135 requirements from what I remember don't include this specific distance requirement. There are a lot of qualified pilots out there that still believe that ATP cross country is point to point with no distance requirements. It'd be interesting to go back 15 years in the regs to see if this was the case back then as well, as i'm sure this is the last time most of these guys looked at them!
 

Berkut

Well-Known Member
The answers you seek are in 61.1.

For the ATP:
(iv) For the purpose of meeting the aeronautical experience requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate (except with a rotorcraft category rating), time acquired during a flight --
(A) Conducted in an appropriate aircraft;
(B) That is at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and
(C) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems.

There is no distinct definition of cross-country time for the part 135 requirement, so it uses the default definition in part 61:
(3) Cross-country time means --
(i) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(3) (ii), (iii), (iv), and (v) of this section, time acquired during a flight --
(A) Conducted by a person who holds a pilot certificate;
(B) Conducted in an aircraft;
(C) That includes a landing at a point other than the point of departure; and
(D) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems to navigate to the landing point.
 

Blackhawk

Well-Known Member
That's good news for military fighter guys!
Yeah, we know the fighter pilots are the ONLY ones who do long x-countries without landing at a different airport.
The irony under the way the rule used to be written, was that a military pilot shot down could log the cross country time; while the pilot who completed the mission and landed at the same airport he/she took off from could not.
 
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