Logging Time Q

Windchill

Well-Known Member
Question -- Two private pilots in the front of lets say a Cessna 172.

The pilot manipulating the controls logs PIC time . . . does the other pilot get to log anything?

I'm killing time at work by really reading and understanding the FAR/AIM Manual and it looks like you can only log S-I-C time if the plane requires two pilots . . . so does the second private pilot log nothing unless he touches the controls?
 

FL270

New Member
Under this circumstance, the only way the second pilot can legally log anything (except when he's manipulating the controls) is if the flying pilot is under the hood and the second pilot is acting as safety pilot, then he can log PIC as well.

SIC can only be logged in aircraft which require two pilots (think airliners, business jets, etc.).

FL270
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Wow, I think we went a whole two weeks without this question being asked!


The second pilot can log "Safety Pilot" time as PIC, if a safety pilot is required for the flight (i.e., one of them is under the hood).
 

Tazman282

New Member
Now what if the second pilot is a CFI, it could be used as instruction or as a flight review, but how many times can you do this in your log book?
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
but how many times can you do this in your log book?


[/ QUOTE ]

Well, I've got 400+ hrs. of it (which isn't much). Its called "dual given" and its what instructors do.
 

Tazman282

New Member
Well, I've got 400+ hrs. of it (which isn't much). Its called "dual given" and its what instructors do.


[/ QUOTE ]


I am not saying that it is for a rating, lets say we are going on a long x-country to visit a friend. You are a CFI, I am a Commercial pilot with a recent flight review. How would you log that in your logbook.
 

mtsu_av8er

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I am not saying that it is for a rating, lets say we are going on a long x-country to visit a friend. You are a CFI, I am a Commercial pilot with a recent flight review. How would you log that in your logbook.

[/ QUOTE ]

Flight instruction doesn't have to be for a rating. If you're getting real, legitimate flight instruction, it's ok. Since getting my instrument rating, I've gotten lots of instrument flight instruction. I've gotten VFR flight instruction in areas that I just haven't practiced. Remeber, a good pilot is ALWAYS learning.

That's a good way for 2 friends to split airplane costs AND stay proficient. Go on a lfight, and train each other. Go on a cross country, and help each other in sreas that you're weak in. my friend flybynight and myself do that a whole lot. It's alot easier to tell a friend that he should work on something than a complete stranger...and it's a whole lot easier to take that criticism from somebody that you know well, in a relaxed enviroment.
 

MrSkyKingRon

New Member
Ok, two private pilots logging SIC- dual- safety pilot-PIC time walk into a bar, and this nun says...


There 'ya have it.
 

aloft

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Under this circumstance, the only way the second pilot can legally log anything (except when he's manipulating the controls) is if the flying pilot is under the hood and the second pilot is acting as safety pilot, then he can log PIC as well.

[/ QUOTE ]Sing it with me people, you know the words:

The second pilot can log the time as PIC only if he/she is acting as pilot in command by prior arrangement between the two of them. "Acting" as safety pilot means nothing; acting as pilot in command means everything. Ergo, the safety pilot then gets to log PIC because he/she/it is the PIC. The guy under the hood gets to log PIC under the sole manipulator rule, provided he/she/it is rated for the category & class of aircraft.

Time for somebody to start a JC Forums FAQ already! And no, I'm not volunteering!
 

Josh

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
by prior arrangement between the two of them.

[/ QUOTE ]

or it can be done while in flight. So if you are on the middle of a trip, and other pilot wants to throw on a hood, that is not prearranged, and you decide then the safety will act as PIC.

It would be a lot easier if the FAA would call it PIC (pilot flying) and PIC (pilot not-flying) so the regs could be cleaned up a bit. Rather than using the 'acting' term, which is where so many seem to get confused and ask questions on this topic.
 

aloft

New Member
"Prior" can mean 30 seconds beforehand, IMHO. The FAA is a bit more persnickety; they don't like PIC responsibility being passed around like a joint inflight (not that I pass joints around inflight or anything
) to avoid the inevitable fingerpointing should a violation occur: "he was PIC!" "no, he was PIC!" No friends on a powder day, or when the FAA's handing out violations.
 
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