Jetliner Questions...

gay_pilot18

New Member
Here are some real quick question that I have always wanted to know the answers to.

1.) What is the procedure for "reverse thrust" on an airliner?

a.) Where are the switches located in the cockpit for "reverse thrust".

b.) Is true that when an airline pilot is landing and over the "numbers". That he or she will bring the thrust levels back to idle. Then on roll out push the thrust levers forward while pushing the reverse thrust button?


2.) Lastly I have seen tons of cockpit pictures and diagrams. I know where most everything is in the cockpit. But where is the lever to lower the "slats"? The lever to lower the "flaps" is located on the right hand side of the cockpit near the co-pilots station. It's marked 0,1,5,15,25,35,40 but what bout the slats where is it's lever?

3.) Okay one last question. Does the 757/767 have a "stabalizer" i.e. not moveable or do they have "stabalators", i.e. moveable. Cause everytime I see a pic of a 757/767 taking off I only see the elevator deflected upwards but the horizontal stabilzer really looks like it could move also and be deflected upwards as well as downwards (if thats a word).
 

Bluto

New Member
1.) What is the procedure for "reverse thrust" on an airliner?
Generally speaking, after landing you may use reverse thrust at speeds that are too high to apply the brakes fully. They are most effective at high speeds and so are usually stowed once you reach a relatively slow speed (ie. 80 knots). In some aircraft they are even used during taxi to keep from overheating the brakes, although most manufacturers don't reccommend this technique.

a.) Where are the switches located in the cockpit for "reverse thrust".
Usually thrust reversers are controlled using levers located directly on the forward portion of the thrust levers (throttles). You can see a good picture of them on a 757 here: http://www.airliners.net/open.file/347792/M/

b.) Is true that when an airline pilot is landing and over the "numbers". That he or she will bring the thrust levels back to idle. Then on roll out push the thrust levers forward while pushing the reverse thrust button?
Usually, reverse thrust is applied by reducing the thrust levers to the idle position, then pulling the reverse thrust levers up (and aft in some cases) deploys the reversers and increases engine RPM to increase their effectiveness. So engine thrust output does increase, but usually as a function of moving the thrust reverser levers up and aft.

2.) But where is the lever to lower the "slats"? The lever to lower the "flaps" is located on the right hand side of the cockpit near the co-pilots station.
That's usually the same control for the slats. Flaps 1 or 2 might deploy only the leading edge devices (slats, flaps, etc.), for example, then as you continue it would deploy the trailing edge flaps as well.

3.) Does the 757/767 have a "stabalizer" i.e. not moveable or do they have "stabalators", i.e. moveable.
Not sure about the 757/767 in particular. However, most jet airliners have a conventional elevator/stabilizer arrangement but adjust elevator trim by trimming the entire stabilizer surface. The Aeronca Champ does the same thing! For this reason, it's important that airliners have trim cut-out switches since it is possible for the elevator trim to overpower the actual elevator input under extreme circumstances.
 

gay_pilot18

New Member
Okay so I guess my next question would be when a airline pilot "trims" the entire elevator surface does the entire horizontal stabilizer move?

On takeoff I can actually see the horizonal stabilizer ona 737 deflect upwards into the air.

On 727, 737,MD-80/90's where the horizontal stabilizer is attached to the vertical stabilizer (in the case of 727's & MD-80/90's) you can see a "hinge" that looks like the entire horizontal surface can move.

On the 737 it has the same hinge/slot looking thing only it's attached to the empanage. If I knew how to put pics. on here or attach a link I'd have a picture to better ilustrate what I'm talking about.

Anyway thx for the great replies and keep em comin
 

A300Capt

Freight Dawg
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Okay so I guess my next question would be when a airline pilot "trims" the entire elevator surface does the entire horizontal stabilizer move?


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The pilot is trimming the entire horizontal stabilizer, never the elevators. Pushing and pulling on the yoke is what moves the elevator, trim switches move the stabilizer to keep the stab/elevators faired.

[ QUOTE ]
On 727, 737,MD-80/90's where the horizontal stabilizer is attached to the vertical stabilizer (in the case of 727's & MD-80/90's) you can see a "hinge" that looks like the entire horizontal surface can move.


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The entire horizontal stab does move. The stab can be trimmed by thumb pickle switches (electric) on either yoke or by manually moving a trim wheel or trim levers on the side of the center pedestal. Newer jets have computers which control the speed of the stab movement during trimming (slower movement at high airspeeds and faster movement at slower speeds) and, automatically apply trim responses during various phases of flight to help the pilot.
 
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